" The House of the Rising Sun " is a traditional folk song , sometimes called " Rising Sun Blues ". It tells of a life gone wrong in New Orleans ; many versions also urge a sibling to avoid the same fate. The most successful commercial version, recorded in 1964 by British rock group the Animals , was a number one hit on the UK Singles Chart and also in the United States and France. [1] As a traditional folk song recorded by an electric rock band, it has been described as the "first folk rock hit". [2] [3]

"House of Rising Sun" was said to have been known by miners in 1905. [6] The oldest published version of the lyrics is that printed by Robert Winslow Gordon in 1925, in a column "Old Songs That Men Have Sung" in Adventure Magazine . [9] The lyrics of that version begin: [9] [10]

The oldest known recording of the song, under the title "Rising Sun Blues", is by Appalachian artists Clarence "Tom" Ashley and Gwen Foster , who recorded it for Vocalion Records on September 6, 1933. [6] [11] Ashley said he had learned it from his grandfather, Enoch Ashley. Roy Acuff , an "early-day friend and apprentice" of Ashley's, learned it from him and recorded it as "Rising Sun" on November 3, 1938. [6] [11] Several older blues recordings of songs with similar titles are unrelated, for example, "Rising Sun Blues" by Ivy Smith (1927) and "The Risin' Sun" by Texas Alexander (1928). [5]

" The House of the Rising Sun " is a traditional folk song , sometimes called " Rising Sun Blues ". It tells of a life gone wrong in New Orleans ; many versions also urge a sibling to avoid the same fate. The most successful commercial version, recorded in 1964 by British rock group the Animals , was a number one hit on the UK Singles Chart and also in the United States and France. [1] As a traditional folk song recorded by an electric rock band, it has been described as the "first folk rock hit". [2] [3]

"House of Rising Sun" was said to have been known by miners in 1905. [6] The oldest published version of the lyrics is that printed by Robert Winslow Gordon in 1925, in a column "Old Songs That Men Have Sung" in Adventure Magazine . [9] The lyrics of that version begin: [9] [10]

The oldest known recording of the song, under the title "Rising Sun Blues", is by Appalachian artists Clarence "Tom" Ashley and Gwen Foster , who recorded it for Vocalion Records on September 6, 1933. [6] [11] Ashley said he had learned it from his grandfather, Enoch Ashley. Roy Acuff , an "early-day friend and apprentice" of Ashley's, learned it from him and recorded it as "Rising Sun" on November 3, 1938. [6] [11] Several older blues recordings of songs with similar titles are unrelated, for example, "Rising Sun Blues" by Ivy Smith (1927) and "The Risin' Sun" by Texas Alexander (1928). [5]

McGahern's work is far subtler and ultimately much more generous in spirit, for it does not depend on such a stalwart simplicity of contrast. In the incident from which the book takes its title, Patrick Ryan explains to Ruttledge why it is so important that their friend Johnny be buried so that his head lies in the west end of the grave. It makes all the difference or no difference; it is a religious belief that is not confined to believers in religion. Ryan's histrionics are perfectly in place here; this is a sober truth and it is a dramatic gesture.

"He sleeps with his head in the west... so that when he wakes he may face the rising sun." "We look to the resurrection of the dead." That is McGahern's exit from the simple contrast. These dead and their traditions no longer weigh like a nightmare on the brain of the living. They have been incorporated into consciousness. At last an Irish author has awakened from the nightmare of history and given us a sense of liberation which is not dependent on flight or emigration or escape.

Face of the Rising Sun by William Sarabande.


Face of the Rising Sun (First Americans Saga): William.

Posted by 2018 article

51t+LqwHxUL