The spectrum my headline mentions isn’t the new name for Time-Warner; it’s the syndrome of incurable neurological disorders called autism. Autism or autism spectrum disorder (ASD)—and the related Asperger’s Syndrome—comes in many shades and colors; it ranges from people so seriously impaired they have literally no communicative skills to those you’d probably not realize have the disorder.

An engaging new play called Uncommon Sense , by the married couple Anushka Paris-Carter and Andy Paris (who also directed), demonstrates this premise by introducing us to five individuals, each representing a different place on the spectrum. These five are at the heart of four stories, none of them connected to the others except for their being about an autistic person or two.

The 90-minute play’s complex, carefully crafted, but easy-to-follow structure allows for telling the stories by interweaving them, creating a mosaic offering case studies of the kinds of experiences encountered by autistic people and their loved ones. The production allows both tears and laughs to flow.

Two videos with award wining professionals prove that point, by using common sense and actual video footage, to the realities vs. the stereotypical myths.

The first video above, is with award winning industry veteran, Dick Moore.  His company has sold factory built homes for decades – reportedly totaling some 27,000 homes. 

Moore has been a first hand witness to that evolution from trailer houses, to mobile homes, to manufactured homes.  Then, there’s this video below, which notes you can pick up a factory-built home with a crane, and it holds together.  What conventional house can you do that with?

The spectrum my headline mentions isn’t the new name for Time-Warner; it’s the syndrome of incurable neurological disorders called autism. Autism or autism spectrum disorder (ASD)—and the related Asperger’s Syndrome—comes in many shades and colors; it ranges from people so seriously impaired they have literally no communicative skills to those you’d probably not realize have the disorder.

An engaging new play called Uncommon Sense , by the married couple Anushka Paris-Carter and Andy Paris (who also directed), demonstrates this premise by introducing us to five individuals, each representing a different place on the spectrum. These five are at the heart of four stories, none of them connected to the others except for their being about an autistic person or two.

The 90-minute play’s complex, carefully crafted, but easy-to-follow structure allows for telling the stories by interweaving them, creating a mosaic offering case studies of the kinds of experiences encountered by autistic people and their loved ones. The production allows both tears and laughs to flow.

Two videos with award wining professionals prove that point, by using common sense and actual video footage, to the realities vs. the stereotypical myths.

The first video above, is with award winning industry veteran, Dick Moore.  His company has sold factory built homes for decades – reportedly totaling some 27,000 homes. 

Moore has been a first hand witness to that evolution from trailer houses, to mobile homes, to manufactured homes.  Then, there’s this video below, which notes you can pick up a factory-built home with a crane, and it holds together.  What conventional house can you do that with?

Dr. Robert Heath is a professor at the University of Bath and a pioneer in establishing the value of emotion in advertising. His research includes the development of the Low Attention Processing Model of advertising, as well as an advertising research system known as the CEP® (Cognitive Emotive Power Test), which analyzes Information and Emotive Power. Nielsen is collaborating with Dr. Heath to incorporate CEP into its new TV Brand Effect module, Creative Evaluation. Creative Evaluation will allow marketers to measure how consumers are connecting with their ad compared to competitor ads and across key demographics.

We recently talked to Dr. Heath about emotional resonance, its importance and how it can be used in improving the effectiveness of advertising.

A: My research with David Brandt and Agnes Nairn shows that emotional response toward advertising plays an important part in building a strong brand. Although advertising often appears to be there just to communicate a message about what the brand does, we have found that the way this message is conveyed – what psychologists call metacommunication – typically has a greater influence on brand favorability and how likely consumers are to buy a brand in the longer term (1). The basis on which metacommunication operates is entirely emotional, conditioning your feelings and building strong relationships. An ad that resonates emotionally is one that will build a stronger better brand over time.

The spectrum my headline mentions isn’t the new name for Time-Warner; it’s the syndrome of incurable neurological disorders called autism. Autism or autism spectrum disorder (ASD)—and the related Asperger’s Syndrome—comes in many shades and colors; it ranges from people so seriously impaired they have literally no communicative skills to those you’d probably not realize have the disorder.

An engaging new play called Uncommon Sense , by the married couple Anushka Paris-Carter and Andy Paris (who also directed), demonstrates this premise by introducing us to five individuals, each representing a different place on the spectrum. These five are at the heart of four stories, none of them connected to the others except for their being about an autistic person or two.

The 90-minute play’s complex, carefully crafted, but easy-to-follow structure allows for telling the stories by interweaving them, creating a mosaic offering case studies of the kinds of experiences encountered by autistic people and their loved ones. The production allows both tears and laughs to flow.

Uncommon Sense - Wikipedia


Review: ‘Uncommon Sense’ Looks at Life on the Autism.

Posted by 2018 article