Eynesbury Forest, at 288 hectares, is one of Victoria’s largest remaining stands of Grey Box, & the largest one south of the Dividing Range. It is a reminder of the Grey Box Woodlands that once covered much of this region, along with vast areas of rolling grasslands. In springtime the woodland comes alive with masses of yellow & gold wattles & bushpeas, as well as numerous smaller wildflowers.

‘In a landscape ecology context it is clear that, particularly for birds, the Eynesbury, Pinkerton and Bush’s Paddock patches function as a single system – each one important for ongoing ecological function in the others.’

Eynesbury Forest is one of several woodlands in this vicinity, ie Pinkerton Forest, Bush’s paddock Woodland, Strathtulloh Woodland & Five Ways Woodland, Eynesbury being by far the biggest.

T. v. vulpecula
T. v. arnhemensis
T. v. eburacensis
T. v. johnsoni
T. v. fuliginosus

The common brushtail possum ( Trichosurus vulpecula , from the Greek for "furry tailed" and the Latin for "little fox", previously in the genus Phalangista [3] ) is a nocturnal , semi- arboreal marsupial of the family Phalangeridae , it is native to Australia , and the second largest of the possums .

Like most possums, the common brushtail possum is nocturnal . It is mainly a folivore , but has been known to eat small mammals such as rats. In most Australian habitats, leaves of eucalyptus are a significant part of the diet but rarely the sole item eaten. The tail is prehensile and naked on its lower underside. There are four colour variations: silver-grey, brown, black, and gold. [4]

The Australian Association for the Education of the Gifted and Talented (AAEGT) came into existence in May 1985 as a result of a growing recognition among educators of the need for the establishment of a national body as a focus for the endeavours of Australian teachers and parents in the field of gifted education. The [...]

This publication is made available with the assistance of the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations.

The Australasian Journal of Gifted Education is the official scholarly peer-reviewed publication of the Australian Association for the Education of [...]

Eynesbury Forest, at 288 hectares, is one of Victoria’s largest remaining stands of Grey Box, & the largest one south of the Dividing Range. It is a reminder of the Grey Box Woodlands that once covered much of this region, along with vast areas of rolling grasslands. In springtime the woodland comes alive with masses of yellow & gold wattles & bushpeas, as well as numerous smaller wildflowers.

‘In a landscape ecology context it is clear that, particularly for birds, the Eynesbury, Pinkerton and Bush’s Paddock patches function as a single system – each one important for ongoing ecological function in the others.’

Eynesbury Forest is one of several woodlands in this vicinity, ie Pinkerton Forest, Bush’s paddock Woodland, Strathtulloh Woodland & Five Ways Woodland, Eynesbury being by far the biggest.

T. v. vulpecula
T. v. arnhemensis
T. v. eburacensis
T. v. johnsoni
T. v. fuliginosus

The common brushtail possum ( Trichosurus vulpecula , from the Greek for "furry tailed" and the Latin for "little fox", previously in the genus Phalangista [3] ) is a nocturnal , semi- arboreal marsupial of the family Phalangeridae , it is native to Australia , and the second largest of the possums .

Like most possums, the common brushtail possum is nocturnal . It is mainly a folivore , but has been known to eat small mammals such as rats. In most Australian habitats, leaves of eucalyptus are a significant part of the diet but rarely the sole item eaten. The tail is prehensile and naked on its lower underside. There are four colour variations: silver-grey, brown, black, and gold. [4]

Eynesbury Forest, at 288 hectares, is one of Victoria’s largest remaining stands of Grey Box, & the largest one south of the Dividing Range. It is a reminder of the Grey Box Woodlands that once covered much of this region, along with vast areas of rolling grasslands. In springtime the woodland comes alive with masses of yellow & gold wattles & bushpeas, as well as numerous smaller wildflowers.

‘In a landscape ecology context it is clear that, particularly for birds, the Eynesbury, Pinkerton and Bush’s Paddock patches function as a single system – each one important for ongoing ecological function in the others.’

Eynesbury Forest is one of several woodlands in this vicinity, ie Pinkerton Forest, Bush’s paddock Woodland, Strathtulloh Woodland & Five Ways Woodland, Eynesbury being by far the biggest.

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