Frederic Remington: The Truth of Other Days is a 1991 documentary of American Western artist Frederic Remington made for the PBS series American Masters . It was produced and directed by Tom Neff and written by Neff and Louise LeQuire. [1] Actor Gregory Peck narrated the film and Ned Beatty was the voice of Remington when reading his correspondence.

The documentary was produced by the Metropolitan Museum of Art , New York; NHK Corporation (Japan); and Polaris Entertainment, Nashville, Tennessee . It was the first documentary to be filmed in High Definition Television ( HDTV ), but at the time it was years away from high-definition television broadcasting. [2]

This documentary of Frederic Remington reviews how the artist popularized the myths, legends, and images we now call the "Old West."

Frederic Remington: The Truth of Other Days is a 1991 documentary of American Western artist Frederic Remington made for the PBS series American Masters . It was produced and directed by Tom Neff and written by Neff and Louise LeQuire. [1] Actor Gregory Peck narrated the film and Ned Beatty was the voice of Remington when reading his correspondence.

The documentary was produced by the Metropolitan Museum of Art , New York; NHK Corporation (Japan); and Polaris Entertainment, Nashville, Tennessee . It was the first documentary to be filmed in High Definition Television ( HDTV ), but at the time it was years away from high-definition television broadcasting. [2]

This documentary of Frederic Remington reviews how the artist popularized the myths, legends, and images we now call the "Old West."

Like most artists-to-be, Fred Remington was obsessed with drawing and made almost endless sketches of his world in his notebooks, on the margins of books, around the edges of his school papers. And almost always a horse figured somewhere in the drawing - usually a horse going at full gallop, for the boy liked plenty of action in his art. 

Click here to see colour image . The link will open in a new window.  To his mother's dismay, Fred was a terrible student. What time he stole from his eternal sketching he spent not at study, but at sports, especially riding. His father enjoyed the boy's art and encouraged him, but his mother wanted him to become a good student and later a respectable citizen, preferably a businessman. She wanted him to have no connections in the artistic world which she considered akin to the rootless world of the gypsies. 

Remington is famous for the lively scenes, in paint and in bronze, of the Old West that form the subject matter of most of his works. In the Spanish-American War he served as a war correspondent and artist. Among his paintings, admired for their forthright and unsentimental naturalism, are The Outlier (1909, Brooklyn Museum, New York City) and Cavalry Charge on the Southern Plains (1907, Metropolitan Museum, New York City). His love of the West was mirrored in his paintings and sculptures, which paralleled the nation's fascination with the closing of the American frontier. 

Frederic Remington , The Hunters' Supper , c. 1909, National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Frederic Sackrider Remington was born in Canton, New York, in 1861, the only son of a Civil War hero. As a young boy, he aspired to a military career, but an interest in drawing led him to Yale University, where he majored in art and joined the football team. Remington left Yale following the sudden death of his father in 1880. A subsequent series of uninspiring clerical jobs left him bored and restless.

Remington at Highland Military Academy, Worcester, Massachusetts, c. 1877, Photograph by The Notman Photographic Company, courtesy Frederic Remington Art Museum, Ogdensburg, New York

Frederic Remington: The Truth of Other Days is a 1991 documentary of American Western artist Frederic Remington made for the PBS series American Masters . It was produced and directed by Tom Neff and written by Neff and Louise LeQuire. [1] Actor Gregory Peck narrated the film and Ned Beatty was the voice of Remington when reading his correspondence.

The documentary was produced by the Metropolitan Museum of Art , New York; NHK Corporation (Japan); and Polaris Entertainment, Nashville, Tennessee . It was the first documentary to be filmed in High Definition Television ( HDTV ), but at the time it was years away from high-definition television broadcasting. [2]

This documentary of Frederic Remington reviews how the artist popularized the myths, legends, and images we now call the "Old West."

Like most artists-to-be, Fred Remington was obsessed with drawing and made almost endless sketches of his world in his notebooks, on the margins of books, around the edges of his school papers. And almost always a horse figured somewhere in the drawing - usually a horse going at full gallop, for the boy liked plenty of action in his art. 

Click here to see colour image . The link will open in a new window.  To his mother's dismay, Fred was a terrible student. What time he stole from his eternal sketching he spent not at study, but at sports, especially riding. His father enjoyed the boy's art and encouraged him, but his mother wanted him to become a good student and later a respectable citizen, preferably a businessman. She wanted him to have no connections in the artistic world which she considered akin to the rootless world of the gypsies. 

Remington is famous for the lively scenes, in paint and in bronze, of the Old West that form the subject matter of most of his works. In the Spanish-American War he served as a war correspondent and artist. Among his paintings, admired for their forthright and unsentimental naturalism, are The Outlier (1909, Brooklyn Museum, New York City) and Cavalry Charge on the Southern Plains (1907, Metropolitan Museum, New York City). His love of the West was mirrored in his paintings and sculptures, which paralleled the nation's fascination with the closing of the American frontier. 

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