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The Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is the client-server network protocol that has been in use by the World-Wide Web since 1990. Whenever you surf the web, your browser will be sending HTTP request messages for HTML pages, images, scripts and styles sheets. Web servers handle these requests by returning response messages that contain the requested resource.

The HTTP request message has a simple text based structure. For example, here is the the request message sent by Internet Explorer (IE) for this web page:

The rest of the message consists of a set of name/value pairs, known as headers (See 2. HTTP Headers ). HTTP clients use header values to control how the request is processed by the server. For example, the Accept-Encoding header indicates that the browser can handle content compressed using the gzip or deflate algorithms (see 8. HTTP Compression ).

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The Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is the client-server network protocol that has been in use by the World-Wide Web since 1990. Whenever you surf the web, your browser will be sending HTTP request messages for HTML pages, images, scripts and styles sheets. Web servers handle these requests by returning response messages that contain the requested resource.

The HTTP request message has a simple text based structure. For example, here is the the request message sent by Internet Explorer (IE) for this web page:

The rest of the message consists of a set of name/value pairs, known as headers (See 2. HTTP Headers ). HTTP clients use header values to control how the request is processed by the server. For example, the Accept-Encoding header indicates that the browser can handle content compressed using the gzip or deflate algorithms (see 8. HTTP Compression ).

One of the key policies of Wikipedia is that all article content has to be verifiable . This means that a reliable source must be able to support the material. All quotations, any material whose verifiability has been challenged or is likely to be challenged and contentious material, whether negative, positive, or neutral, about living persons , must include an inline citation to a source that directly supports the material. This also means that Wikipedia is not the place for original work , archival findings that have not been published, or evidence from any source that has not been published.


If you are adding new content, it is your responsibility to add source information along with it. Material provided without a source is more likely to be removed from an article. Sometimes such material will be tagged first with a [ citation needed ] template to give editors time to find and add sources before it is removed, but sometimes editors will simply remove it because they question its veracity.


This tutorial will show you how to add inline citations to articles, and also briefly explain what Wikipedia considers to be a reliable source.

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

Tabs
Dropdowns
Accordions
Convert Weights
Animated Buttons
Side Navigation
Top Navigation
Modal Boxes
Progress Bars
Parallax
Login Form
HTML Includes
Google Maps
Range Sliders
Tooltips
Slideshow
Filter List
Sort List

Tabs
Dropdowns
Accordions
Convert Weights
Animated Buttons
Side Navigation
Top Navigation
Modal Boxes
Progress Bars
Parallax
Login Form
HTML Includes
Google Maps
Range Sliders
Tooltips
Slideshow
Filter List
Sort List

The Hyper Text Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is the client-server network protocol that has been in use by the World-Wide Web since 1990. Whenever you surf the web, your browser will be sending HTTP request messages for HTML pages, images, scripts and styles sheets. Web servers handle these requests by returning response messages that contain the requested resource.

The HTTP request message has a simple text based structure. For example, here is the the request message sent by Internet Explorer (IE) for this web page:

The rest of the message consists of a set of name/value pairs, known as headers (See 2. HTTP Headers ). HTTP clients use header values to control how the request is processed by the server. For example, the Accept-Encoding header indicates that the browser can handle content compressed using the gzip or deflate algorithms (see 8. HTTP Compression ).

One of the key policies of Wikipedia is that all article content has to be verifiable . This means that a reliable source must be able to support the material. All quotations, any material whose verifiability has been challenged or is likely to be challenged and contentious material, whether negative, positive, or neutral, about living persons , must include an inline citation to a source that directly supports the material. This also means that Wikipedia is not the place for original work , archival findings that have not been published, or evidence from any source that has not been published.


If you are adding new content, it is your responsibility to add source information along with it. Material provided without a source is more likely to be removed from an article. Sometimes such material will be tagged first with a [ citation needed ] template to give editors time to find and add sources before it is removed, but sometimes editors will simply remove it because they question its veracity.


This tutorial will show you how to add inline citations to articles, and also briefly explain what Wikipedia considers to be a reliable source.

Intro to Microsoft Azure | Microsoft Docs


HTTP Introduction | HttpWatch

Posted by 2018 article

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