Read novel online » Five Hundred Mistakes of Daily Occurrence in Speaking, Pronouncing, and Writing the English Language

Read novel online » Five Hundred Mistakes of Daily Occurrence in Speaking, Pronouncing, and Writing the English Language » Part 2

58. "He _has got_ my slate:" omit _got_; _has_ is sufficient for the sense. The addition of _got_, though not ungrammatical, but gradually becoming obsolete, does not in any degree strengthen the meaning.

61. "You cannot _catch_ him:" pronounce _catch_ so as to rhyme with _match_, and not _ketch_--as the fishermen are in the habit of saying.

Read novel online » Five Hundred Mistakes of Daily Occurrence in Speaking, Pronouncing, and Writing the English Language

Read novel online » Five Hundred Mistakes of Daily Occurrence in Speaking, Pronouncing, and Writing the English Language » Part 2

58. "He _has got_ my slate:" omit _got_; _has_ is sufficient for the sense. The addition of _got_, though not ungrammatical, but gradually becoming obsolete, does not in any degree strengthen the meaning.

61. "You cannot _catch_ him:" pronounce _catch_ so as to rhyme with _match_, and not _ketch_--as the fishermen are in the habit of saying.

"He drinks wine at dinner," means that such is his habit; "he is drinking wine at dinner," refers to one particular time and occasion.

Of the phrases " never so good," or, " ever so good," as to whether one is preferable to the other, authority is divided. Modern usage inclines to the latter, while ancient preferred the former, as in the Scriptural expression, "charm he never so wisely."

Yea and nay are not equivalent to yes and no ; the latter are directly affirmative and negative, while the former are variously employed.

Read novel online » Five Hundred Mistakes of Daily Occurrence in Speaking, Pronouncing, and Writing the English Language

Five Hundred Mistakes Of Daily Occurrence In Speaking.


Five Hundred Mistakes of Daily Occurrence in Speaking.

Posted by 2018 article

41KIHdNxS4L