As the Chair of the United Nations Human Rights Commission, Eleanor Roosevelt was the driving force in creating the 1948 charter which will always be her legacy: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

In 1946, Roosevelt was appointed as a delegate to the United Nations by President Harry Truman, who had succeeded to the White House after the death of Franklin Roosevelt in 1945. As head of the Human Rights Commission, she was instrumental in formulating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights , which she submitted to the United Nations General Assembly with these words:

“We stand today at the threshold of a great event both in the life of the United Nations and in the life of mankind. This Declaration may well become the international Magna Carta for all men everywhere.”

As the Chair of the United Nations Human Rights Commission, Eleanor Roosevelt was the driving force in creating the 1948 charter which will always be her legacy: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

In 1946, Roosevelt was appointed as a delegate to the United Nations by President Harry Truman, who had succeeded to the White House after the death of Franklin Roosevelt in 1945. As head of the Human Rights Commission, she was instrumental in formulating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights , which she submitted to the United Nations General Assembly with these words:

“We stand today at the threshold of a great event both in the life of the United Nations and in the life of mankind. This Declaration may well become the international Magna Carta for all men everywhere.”

At age fifteen, she was sent away to the Allenswood School outside London. Its founder, Marie Souvestre, the daughter of the French radical philosopher Emil Souvestre, who saw in the tall, slender, diffident young American “the most amiable girl I have ever met” (Cook, p. 110), opened up to her the worlds of art and ideas and service to the less fortunate and encouraged her to think for herself. “Whatever I have become,” Eleanor Roosevelt wrote in the first volume of her autobiography, “had its seeds in those three years of contact with a liberal mind and strong personality.”

Eleanor returned to America at age eighteen because her relatives insisted she make her formal debut in New York society, but Souvestre’s lessons were not forgotten. Eleanor joined the National Consumer’s League, which championed health and safety standards for workers, and she began teaching calisthenics and “fancy dancing” to the children of immigrants at the Rivington Street Settlement House on Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

In November 1902 her cousin Franklin Delano Roosevelt, whom she had known since childhood, began to court her. He was attracted to her intelligence and sympathy–and perhaps by her closeness to the man he admired most, Theodore Roosevelt. She in turn was drawn to his cheerful buoyancy. He was “perfectly secure . . while I was perfectly insecure,” she remembered. But she also confessed to a cousin her worry that Franklin was too “attractive” to remain in love with her for long.

As the Chair of the United Nations Human Rights Commission, Eleanor Roosevelt was the driving force in creating the 1948 charter which will always be her legacy: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

In 1946, Roosevelt was appointed as a delegate to the United Nations by President Harry Truman, who had succeeded to the White House after the death of Franklin Roosevelt in 1945. As head of the Human Rights Commission, she was instrumental in formulating the Universal Declaration of Human Rights , which she submitted to the United Nations General Assembly with these words:

“We stand today at the threshold of a great event both in the life of the United Nations and in the life of mankind. This Declaration may well become the international Magna Carta for all men everywhere.”

At age fifteen, she was sent away to the Allenswood School outside London. Its founder, Marie Souvestre, the daughter of the French radical philosopher Emil Souvestre, who saw in the tall, slender, diffident young American “the most amiable girl I have ever met” (Cook, p. 110), opened up to her the worlds of art and ideas and service to the less fortunate and encouraged her to think for herself. “Whatever I have become,” Eleanor Roosevelt wrote in the first volume of her autobiography, “had its seeds in those three years of contact with a liberal mind and strong personality.”

Eleanor returned to America at age eighteen because her relatives insisted she make her formal debut in New York society, but Souvestre’s lessons were not forgotten. Eleanor joined the National Consumer’s League, which championed health and safety standards for workers, and she began teaching calisthenics and “fancy dancing” to the children of immigrants at the Rivington Street Settlement House on Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

In November 1902 her cousin Franklin Delano Roosevelt, whom she had known since childhood, began to court her. He was attracted to her intelligence and sympathy–and perhaps by her closeness to the man he admired most, Theodore Roosevelt. She in turn was drawn to his cheerful buoyancy. He was “perfectly secure . . while I was perfectly insecure,” she remembered. But she also confessed to a cousin her worry that Franklin was too “attractive” to remain in love with her for long.

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt ( / ˈ ɛ l ɪ n ɔːr ˈ r oʊ z ə v ɛ l t / ; October 11, 1884 – November 7, 1962) was an American politician, diplomat and activist. [1] She was the longest-serving First Lady of the United States , having held the post from March 1933 to April 1945 during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt 's four terms in office, [1] and served as United States Delegate to the United Nations General Assembly from 1945 to 1952. [2] [3] President Harry S. Truman later called her the "First Lady of the World" in tribute to her human rights achievements. [4]

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt was born in 1884 at 56 West 37th Street in Manhattan , New York City, [7] [8] to socialites Anna Rebecca Hall and Elliott Bulloch Roosevelt . [9] From an early age she preferred to be called by her middle name, Eleanor. Through her father, she was a niece of President Theodore Roosevelt . Through her mother, she was a niece of tennis champions Valentine Gill "Vallie" Hall III and Edward Ludlow Hall . Her mother nicknamed her "Granny" because she acted in such a serious manner as a child. [10] Her mother was also somewhat ashamed of Eleanor's plainness. [10]

Eleanor had two younger brothers: Elliott Jr. and Hall . She also had a half brother, Elliott Roosevelt Mann, through her father's affair with Katy Mann, a servant employed by the family. [11] Roosevelt was born into a world of immense wealth and privilege, as her family was part of New York high society called the "swells". [12]

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Eleanor Roosevelt - U.S. First Lady, Diplomat - Biography

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