Are you using cartoons to expose your kids to a new language? Here’s how to turn it from a passive experience to an effective language learning activity for both of you.

Let’s start by clearing something up. Just sitting your kid in front of 2 hours of Tintin a day isn’t going to do the job ok? If it did, this would be a really short post and everybody would have multilingual kids. And yet so often on forums and threads when someone is looking for advice I see ‘watch cartoons’. This advice really frustrates me because it leads you towards two language traps – (1) that passive listening is an effective strategy and (2) that some people are talented at languages and some people aren’t.

If you expect your kids to speak or understand a language even after many hours of watching you’re going to be disappointed and disheartened or worse, think that your child just doesn’t have the ‘language gene’.

It makes you adopt kittens. It makes you stare at photos of baby animals for hours on end. But can it also help you learn Russian ?

The answer is a resounding “yes.” Through the power of cartoons, the most adorable form of entertainment, you can improve your Russian skills while still gasping at the sheer cuteness.

And Russia has produced some amazing cartoons. Yes, Russian animation is so noteworthy that there’s a Wikipedia page dedicated to its storied history.

These are the benefits that recent research has uncovered, spurring the growing popularity of using sign language with hearing children.

It's the latest development in parenting, and early childhood experts are encouraging parents to try it out with their babies and young children.

Our fun software is designed for hearing babies and small children - to teach and practise sign language while playing fun computer games, singing songs and watching cute cartoon stories that a child can identify with.

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Are you using cartoons to expose your kids to a new language? Here’s how to turn it from a passive experience to an effective language learning activity for both of you.

Let’s start by clearing something up. Just sitting your kid in front of 2 hours of Tintin a day isn’t going to do the job ok? If it did, this would be a really short post and everybody would have multilingual kids. And yet so often on forums and threads when someone is looking for advice I see ‘watch cartoons’. This advice really frustrates me because it leads you towards two language traps – (1) that passive listening is an effective strategy and (2) that some people are talented at languages and some people aren’t.

If you expect your kids to speak or understand a language even after many hours of watching you’re going to be disappointed and disheartened or worse, think that your child just doesn’t have the ‘language gene’.

It makes you adopt kittens. It makes you stare at photos of baby animals for hours on end. But can it also help you learn Russian ?

The answer is a resounding “yes.” Through the power of cartoons, the most adorable form of entertainment, you can improve your Russian skills while still gasping at the sheer cuteness.

And Russia has produced some amazing cartoons. Yes, Russian animation is so noteworthy that there’s a Wikipedia page dedicated to its storied history.

These are the benefits that recent research has uncovered, spurring the growing popularity of using sign language with hearing children.

It's the latest development in parenting, and early childhood experts are encouraging parents to try it out with their babies and young children.

Our fun software is designed for hearing babies and small children - to teach and practise sign language while playing fun computer games, singing songs and watching cute cartoon stories that a child can identify with.

Oops. A firewall is blocking access to Prezi content. Check out this article to learn more or contact your system administrator.

Cartoons are designed to tap into a child’s innate way of learning. And what works for children can work for adult language learners as well .

Some cartoons are made to teach simple lessons about things like letters, numbers and shapes. Others are meant to impart cultural knowledge or life lessons . Still others tell stories by playing on cultural details.

Just like “The Simpsons” captures many facets of American society—exaggerated though they may be, at times—Arabic-language cartoons also present you with a true slice of modern Arab life .

Are you using cartoons to expose your kids to a new language? Here’s how to turn it from a passive experience to an effective language learning activity for both of you.

Let’s start by clearing something up. Just sitting your kid in front of 2 hours of Tintin a day isn’t going to do the job ok? If it did, this would be a really short post and everybody would have multilingual kids. And yet so often on forums and threads when someone is looking for advice I see ‘watch cartoons’. This advice really frustrates me because it leads you towards two language traps – (1) that passive listening is an effective strategy and (2) that some people are talented at languages and some people aren’t.

If you expect your kids to speak or understand a language even after many hours of watching you’re going to be disappointed and disheartened or worse, think that your child just doesn’t have the ‘language gene’.

Are you using cartoons to expose your kids to a new language? Here’s how to turn it from a passive experience to an effective language learning activity for both of you.

Let’s start by clearing something up. Just sitting your kid in front of 2 hours of Tintin a day isn’t going to do the job ok? If it did, this would be a really short post and everybody would have multilingual kids. And yet so often on forums and threads when someone is looking for advice I see ‘watch cartoons’. This advice really frustrates me because it leads you towards two language traps – (1) that passive listening is an effective strategy and (2) that some people are talented at languages and some people aren’t.

If you expect your kids to speak or understand a language even after many hours of watching you’re going to be disappointed and disheartened or worse, think that your child just doesn’t have the ‘language gene’.

It makes you adopt kittens. It makes you stare at photos of baby animals for hours on end. But can it also help you learn Russian ?

The answer is a resounding “yes.” Through the power of cartoons, the most adorable form of entertainment, you can improve your Russian skills while still gasping at the sheer cuteness.

And Russia has produced some amazing cartoons. Yes, Russian animation is so noteworthy that there’s a Wikipedia page dedicated to its storied history.

These are the benefits that recent research has uncovered, spurring the growing popularity of using sign language with hearing children.

It's the latest development in parenting, and early childhood experts are encouraging parents to try it out with their babies and young children.

Our fun software is designed for hearing babies and small children - to teach and practise sign language while playing fun computer games, singing songs and watching cute cartoon stories that a child can identify with.

Are you using cartoons to expose your kids to a new language? Here’s how to turn it from a passive experience to an effective language learning activity for both of you.

Let’s start by clearing something up. Just sitting your kid in front of 2 hours of Tintin a day isn’t going to do the job ok? If it did, this would be a really short post and everybody would have multilingual kids. And yet so often on forums and threads when someone is looking for advice I see ‘watch cartoons’. This advice really frustrates me because it leads you towards two language traps – (1) that passive listening is an effective strategy and (2) that some people are talented at languages and some people aren’t.

If you expect your kids to speak or understand a language even after many hours of watching you’re going to be disappointed and disheartened or worse, think that your child just doesn’t have the ‘language gene’.

It makes you adopt kittens. It makes you stare at photos of baby animals for hours on end. But can it also help you learn Russian ?

The answer is a resounding “yes.” Through the power of cartoons, the most adorable form of entertainment, you can improve your Russian skills while still gasping at the sheer cuteness.

And Russia has produced some amazing cartoons. Yes, Russian animation is so noteworthy that there’s a Wikipedia page dedicated to its storied history.

How to Use Cartoons to Learn a Language with Your Kids.


Russian cartoons – Learn Russian for free

Posted by 2018 article

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