Grimm Fairy Tale Flashback is where we take a look into the truly massive archive of Zenescope Entertainment, pick a back issue and tell you why you should seek it out and read it. Think of us as your own personal highlight reel showing you the best of Zenescope over the years.

  If you are a regular reader of Zenescope’s Grimm Universe (and what self-respecting comic book fan wouldn’t be?) then you have probably noticed a subtle shift in the storytelling in their books over the last year or so. What began as a handful of titles with just the most tenuous of ties has become a tightly knit, single epic storyline being told with Grimm Fairy Tales at the center and various miniseries and one-shots spinning out from there. It has resulted in a more cohesive universe that is a lot of fun to follow and a blast to read each month.

And if we were to look back, we would see that this new style had it’s beginnings in the pages of Grimm Fairy Tales: Myths & Legends, specifically the final issue, #25.

Gina and Hank investigation into the local urban legend of the witches den brings them to a strange town on the outskirts of Salem. The town people refuse to speak about the abandoned house at the top of the hill although its history is well known. Once upon a time a witch of terrifying power dined on the flesh of those unfortunate to venture to her doorstep. Murdered by the townspeople's her ghost supposedly still haunts the house to this day. Gina and Hank plan to disprove this legend but are in for a terrifying surprise when they both learn that the legends are true.

Not that these are "soft" versions of the fairy tales we know and love—they're just not quite as jarring as the original material. Whereas the Brothers Grimm didn't hesitate to include excessive violence, genuine terror and even (on occasion) sexual references, authors like Andrew Lang opted to gentle the stories a bit so as not to spook the youngsters too much. While we certainly encourage you to read the originals and introduce them to your kids at some point, the books you'll find in this section are a great place to start small children on traditional tales and folklore.

It's not so much that fairy tales offer kids a new way of seeing the world, it's more that they are already in line with the way kids do see the world. For a child, monsters really do lurk in the shadows, pumpkins can turn into vehicles, and animals really do have rational thoughts and can even (at times, if you listen closely enough) talk. To force children into an adult world where only the unavoidable and routine can take place is to rob them of not only their youth, but their ability to imagine.

More than any other kind of story, fairy tales are only a segue to genuine creativity. Kids read about Princes Charming, Princesses in Distress, Dragons, Dragon-Fighters, dwarfs, elves and pixies—and then become each of these things in turn in the backyard. Not that most children need inspiration, but it certainly can't hurt, nor can it hurt for them to realize they aren't the first ones to imagine fairies in the trees and gnomes in the garden. We've chosen the books you'll find here for the quality of artwork, faithfulness of adaptation, and overall appeal both to kids and their parents (who may have missed out on good fairy tales themselves).

Grimm Fairy Tale Flashback is where we take a look into the truly massive archive of Zenescope Entertainment, pick a back issue and tell you why you should seek it out and read it. Think of us as your own personal highlight reel showing you the best of Zenescope over the years.

  If you are a regular reader of Zenescope’s Grimm Universe (and what self-respecting comic book fan wouldn’t be?) then you have probably noticed a subtle shift in the storytelling in their books over the last year or so. What began as a handful of titles with just the most tenuous of ties has become a tightly knit, single epic storyline being told with Grimm Fairy Tales at the center and various miniseries and one-shots spinning out from there. It has resulted in a more cohesive universe that is a lot of fun to follow and a blast to read each month.

And if we were to look back, we would see that this new style had it’s beginnings in the pages of Grimm Fairy Tales: Myths & Legends, specifically the final issue, #25.

Gina and Hank investigation into the local urban legend of the witches den brings them to a strange town on the outskirts of Salem. The town people refuse to speak about the abandoned house at the top of the hill although its history is well known. Once upon a time a witch of terrifying power dined on the flesh of those unfortunate to venture to her doorstep. Murdered by the townspeople's her ghost supposedly still haunts the house to this day. Gina and Hank plan to disprove this legend but are in for a terrifying surprise when they both learn that the legends are true.

Grimm Fairy Tale Flashback is where we take a look into the truly massive archive of Zenescope Entertainment, pick a back issue and tell you why you should seek it out and read it. Think of us as your own personal highlight reel showing you the best of Zenescope over the years.

  If you are a regular reader of Zenescope’s Grimm Universe (and what self-respecting comic book fan wouldn’t be?) then you have probably noticed a subtle shift in the storytelling in their books over the last year or so. What began as a handful of titles with just the most tenuous of ties has become a tightly knit, single epic storyline being told with Grimm Fairy Tales at the center and various miniseries and one-shots spinning out from there. It has resulted in a more cohesive universe that is a lot of fun to follow and a blast to read each month.

And if we were to look back, we would see that this new style had it’s beginnings in the pages of Grimm Fairy Tales: Myths & Legends, specifically the final issue, #25.

Grimm Fairy Tales (comics) - Wikipedia


Grimm Fairy Tales: Myths & Legends Volume 5: Troy.

Posted by 2018 article

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