Hughes had written a musical play version of Tambourines to Glory in 1956, and he changed the story only slightly to create the novel. Several of the novel's thirty-six brief chapters read like a play script. The novel as a whole is noticeably without extended descriptive passages, characters' unspoken thoughts, and other qualities that often distinguish prose fiction from drama.

Rollicking gospel spills out of Harlem’s Second Canaan Baptist Church. Langston Hughes wrote lyrics to these songs for his novel and play Tambourines to Glory with a small, independent gospel church chorus just like this in mind. Jobe Huntley set Hughes’s lyrics to music.

Billy Rose Theatre Division, The New York Public Library. "Tambourines to glory. [1963]" The New York Public Library Digital Collections . http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/be5b5108-3959-f234-e040-e00a18060a47

Billy Rose Theatre Division, The New York Public Library. "Tambourines to glory. [1963]" New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed March 16, 2018. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/be5b5108-3959-f234-e040-e00a18060a47

NYPL is always looking for ways to promote how researchers, writers, artists, and patrons are using the libary's materials. We'd love to hear what you're working on!

Hughes had written a musical play version of Tambourines to Glory in 1956, and he changed the story only slightly to create the novel. Several of the novel's thirty-six brief chapters read like a play script. The novel as a whole is noticeably without extended descriptive passages, characters' unspoken thoughts, and other qualities that often distinguish prose fiction from drama.

Hughes had written a musical play version of Tambourines to Glory in 1956, and he changed the story only slightly to create the novel. Several of the novel's thirty-six brief chapters read like a play script. The novel as a whole is noticeably without extended descriptive passages, characters' unspoken thoughts, and other qualities that often distinguish prose fiction from drama.

Rollicking gospel spills out of Harlem’s Second Canaan Baptist Church. Langston Hughes wrote lyrics to these songs for his novel and play Tambourines to Glory with a small, independent gospel church chorus just like this in mind. Jobe Huntley set Hughes’s lyrics to music.

Hughes had written a musical play version of Tambourines to Glory in 1956, and he changed the story only slightly to create the novel. Several of the novel's thirty-six brief chapters read like a play script. The novel as a whole is noticeably without extended descriptive passages, characters' unspoken thoughts, and other qualities that often distinguish prose fiction from drama.

Rollicking gospel spills out of Harlem’s Second Canaan Baptist Church. Langston Hughes wrote lyrics to these songs for his novel and play Tambourines to Glory with a small, independent gospel church chorus just like this in mind. Jobe Huntley set Hughes’s lyrics to music.

Billy Rose Theatre Division, The New York Public Library. "Tambourines to glory. [1963]" The New York Public Library Digital Collections . http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/be5b5108-3959-f234-e040-e00a18060a47

Billy Rose Theatre Division, The New York Public Library. "Tambourines to glory. [1963]" New York Public Library Digital Collections. Accessed March 16, 2018. http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/be5b5108-3959-f234-e040-e00a18060a47

NYPL is always looking for ways to promote how researchers, writers, artists, and patrons are using the libary's materials. We'd love to hear what you're working on!

Tambourines to Glory is a gospel play with music by Langston Hughes . It tells the story of two female street preachers who open a storefront church in Harlem . The play premiered on Broadway in 1963.

Hughes began writing Tambourines to Glory: A Play with Songs in July 1956, [1] and later that year turned it into a novel, which was published by John Day in 1958. [2]

The play opened on Broadway at the Little Theatre November 2, 1963 and closed on November 23, 1963. The playbill for the 1963 premiere makes reference to the "gospel singing play" being adapted from Hughes' novel. [3]

Tambourines to Glory by Langston Hughes - Goodreads


Amazon.com: Tambourines to Glory: A Novel (Harlem Moon.

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