The concept known as the law of the instrument , otherwise known as the law of the hammer , [1] Maslow's hammer (or gavel), or the golden hammer , [a] is a cognitive bias that involves an over-reliance on a familiar tool. As Abraham Maslow said in 1966, "I suppose it is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail." [2]

The concept is attributed both to Maslow [3] and to Abraham Kaplan, [4] [5] although the hammer and nail line may not be original to either of them. It has in fact been attributed "to everyone from Buddha to Bernard Baruch". Mark Twain has sometimes been credited with it, though it cannot be found in Twain's published writings. [6] Under the name of "Baruch's Observation", it has also been attributed to the stock market speculator and author Bernard M. Baruch . [7]

Sharlyn Lauby has drawn the following lesson from the law: "We need choose the tools we work with carefully." Some tools are adaptable, while others should be employed "only for their intended purpose". [8]

The concept known as the law of the instrument , otherwise known as the law of the hammer , [1] Maslow's hammer (or gavel), or the golden hammer , [a] is a cognitive bias that involves an over-reliance on a familiar tool. As Abraham Maslow said in 1966, "I suppose it is tempting, if the only tool you have is a hammer, to treat everything as if it were a nail." [2]

The concept is attributed both to Maslow [3] and to Abraham Kaplan, [4] [5] although the hammer and nail line may not be original to either of them. It has in fact been attributed "to everyone from Buddha to Bernard Baruch". Mark Twain has sometimes been credited with it, though it cannot be found in Twain's published writings. [6] Under the name of "Baruch's Observation", it has also been attributed to the stock market speculator and author Bernard M. Baruch . [7]

Sharlyn Lauby has drawn the following lesson from the law: "We need choose the tools we work with carefully." Some tools are adaptable, while others should be employed "only for their intended purpose". [8]

Men are loyal, with 6.2 years being the average length of time men report they have been going to the same stylist or barber. Once a guy experiences the Hammer & Nails difference, he’s likely to keep coming back for years.

47% of men get their hair cut every four weeks. Some even more frequently. You’ll benefit from reliable recurring revenue, plus the opportunity to expose these customers to your other services. The more your clients see other men enjoying hand and foot grooming, the more likely they’ll be to try it themselves.

70% of the time men who go to salons make appointments for their haircuts. Our appointment-based business model makes it easier to predict work flow and staffing needs and our POS software allows for the granular management of your staffing needs to maximize Shop productivity.

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Hammers and Nails The Statler Brothers, Johnny Cash.

Posted by 2018 article

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