Justice League of America had two distinguishing qualities when it first launched early this year. It boasted a strong team dynamic and was bolstered by the always incredible work of Ivan Reis. Sadly, these most recent two issues have shown that there's not much left once you remove those two pieces from the equation. What began as a promising addition to the Rebirth lineup has quickly lost its footing.

You'd think the "JLA vs. Extremists" premise would at least allow writer Steve Orlando to play the more interesting personalities on each team against one another. The cover to this issue suggests a fun brawl between Lobo and Wolverine/Sabretooth analogue Tracer. But that confrontation doesn't really amount to much here. There's a lot of wasted potential with this conflict when it comes to characterization.

Even if the characterization remained as strong, the loss of Ivan Reis would still be a serious blow to this young series. With Rebirth nearing its one-year anniversary, it's painfully clear that DC still hasn't gotten any better about giving artists sufficient lead time on new assignments. This time, Diogenes Neves fills in for Reis. This issue is at least an improvement on the clearly rushed issue #2. Neves' line-work is sleek and confident. But the art still lacks the energy of Reis' issues, and also his unique talent for extracting the maximum emotion out of every panel.

Justice League of America had two distinguishing qualities when it first launched early this year. It boasted a strong team dynamic and was bolstered by the always incredible work of Ivan Reis. Sadly, these most recent two issues have shown that there's not much left once you remove those two pieces from the equation. What began as a promising addition to the Rebirth lineup has quickly lost its footing.

You'd think the "JLA vs. Extremists" premise would at least allow writer Steve Orlando to play the more interesting personalities on each team against one another. The cover to this issue suggests a fun brawl between Lobo and Wolverine/Sabretooth analogue Tracer. But that confrontation doesn't really amount to much here. There's a lot of wasted potential with this conflict when it comes to characterization.

Even if the characterization remained as strong, the loss of Ivan Reis would still be a serious blow to this young series. With Rebirth nearing its one-year anniversary, it's painfully clear that DC still hasn't gotten any better about giving artists sufficient lead time on new assignments. This time, Diogenes Neves fills in for Reis. This issue is at least an improvement on the clearly rushed issue #2. Neves' line-work is sleek and confident. But the art still lacks the energy of Reis' issues, and also his unique talent for extracting the maximum emotion out of every panel.

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Comic book covers presented at Cover Browser are republished within a fair use context. Each gallery's images are © by their artist or comics publisher.

This isn't actually the first issue of DC's new Justice League of America series, but it might as well be. Justice League of America Rebirth #1 was a very formulaic team-building story, which is all the more frustrating given the fact that this issue shows readers everything they need to know about the new JLA in itself. But the good news is that, freed of the need for setup, Justice League of America is already a stronger comic.

This series has two main selling points at this early stage - the quirky team lineup and Ivan Reis' artwork. The more action-oriented focus in this sophomore issue emphasizes both selling points. Reis could hardly have found a better home in his first ongoing DC Rebirth assignment. This is a team comprised of heroes who are physically powerful but much more flawed and human than the regular Justice League. That plays directly to Reis' storytelling strengths. He's able to craft figures that are as vibrant and emotional as they are powerful. This issue features several epic splash images, but often it's the more intimate, close-up panels that stand out the most.

Thankfully, this issue remains pretty consistent despite the fact that Reis' work is inked by three different artists. Reis' work also seems to gel much better with colorist Marcelo Maiolo than it did in the Rebirth issue. Perhaps that's down to experience, or maybe the simple fact that this is a much more colorful and chaotic issue. The rampant flames and scenes of property damage seem to bring out the best in Maiolo's color work.

The conclusion to “Panic In the Microverse” disappointed me, but if I’m being honest, I let my expectation of the story overrule my judgment of the issue itself. Do I feel the story had problems? Yes. Did it deserve a higher score than I gave it? Yes. But this is a new story, and I’ve had time to digest everything before stepping into this chapter.

“Panic in the Microverse” wrapped by revealing that Prometheus had received a wish by the Might Beyond the Mirror. He used the wish to restore his body following the events that occurred in Midnighter (which I highly recommend), and now that he’s back. Instead of seeking revenge against the man who crippled him though, he’s going after the most public symbol of justice: the JLA! And to do so, he’s going to use the League’s openness to the public to serve as their greatest downfall.

This issue kicks off with a documentarian, John Porter, covering the Justice League of America. He makes his way through the headquarters, and also interviews each League member. Noticeably absent, however, is Batman – who apparently is away on another mission. As Porter interviews each League member, it becomes clear that something isn’t right as Porter identifies opportunities within the team and explores them. Following the interview, an attack occurs on the base, and things take a turn for the worse.

Actor: Matthew Settle , Kimberly Oja , John Kassir , Michelle Hurd , Kenny Johnston , David Krumholtz , Elisa Donovan , Ron Pearson , David Ogden Stiers , Miguel Ferrer

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Justice League of America had two distinguishing qualities when it first launched early this year. It boasted a strong team dynamic and was bolstered by the always incredible work of Ivan Reis. Sadly, these most recent two issues have shown that there's not much left once you remove those two pieces from the equation. What began as a promising addition to the Rebirth lineup has quickly lost its footing.

You'd think the "JLA vs. Extremists" premise would at least allow writer Steve Orlando to play the more interesting personalities on each team against one another. The cover to this issue suggests a fun brawl between Lobo and Wolverine/Sabretooth analogue Tracer. But that confrontation doesn't really amount to much here. There's a lot of wasted potential with this conflict when it comes to characterization.

Even if the characterization remained as strong, the loss of Ivan Reis would still be a serious blow to this young series. With Rebirth nearing its one-year anniversary, it's painfully clear that DC still hasn't gotten any better about giving artists sufficient lead time on new assignments. This time, Diogenes Neves fills in for Reis. This issue is at least an improvement on the clearly rushed issue #2. Neves' line-work is sleek and confident. But the art still lacks the energy of Reis' issues, and also his unique talent for extracting the maximum emotion out of every panel.

Home  |  Labs  |  Random  |   |  About  |  this is the sister site of Vintage Ad Browser

Comic book covers presented at Cover Browser are republished within a fair use context. Each gallery's images are © by their artist or comics publisher.

This isn't actually the first issue of DC's new Justice League of America series, but it might as well be. Justice League of America Rebirth #1 was a very formulaic team-building story, which is all the more frustrating given the fact that this issue shows readers everything they need to know about the new JLA in itself. But the good news is that, freed of the need for setup, Justice League of America is already a stronger comic.

This series has two main selling points at this early stage - the quirky team lineup and Ivan Reis' artwork. The more action-oriented focus in this sophomore issue emphasizes both selling points. Reis could hardly have found a better home in his first ongoing DC Rebirth assignment. This is a team comprised of heroes who are physically powerful but much more flawed and human than the regular Justice League. That plays directly to Reis' storytelling strengths. He's able to craft figures that are as vibrant and emotional as they are powerful. This issue features several epic splash images, but often it's the more intimate, close-up panels that stand out the most.

Thankfully, this issue remains pretty consistent despite the fact that Reis' work is inked by three different artists. Reis' work also seems to gel much better with colorist Marcelo Maiolo than it did in the Rebirth issue. Perhaps that's down to experience, or maybe the simple fact that this is a much more colorful and chaotic issue. The rampant flames and scenes of property damage seem to bring out the best in Maiolo's color work.

Justice League of America had two distinguishing qualities when it first launched early this year. It boasted a strong team dynamic and was bolstered by the always incredible work of Ivan Reis. Sadly, these most recent two issues have shown that there's not much left once you remove those two pieces from the equation. What began as a promising addition to the Rebirth lineup has quickly lost its footing.

You'd think the "JLA vs. Extremists" premise would at least allow writer Steve Orlando to play the more interesting personalities on each team against one another. The cover to this issue suggests a fun brawl between Lobo and Wolverine/Sabretooth analogue Tracer. But that confrontation doesn't really amount to much here. There's a lot of wasted potential with this conflict when it comes to characterization.

Even if the characterization remained as strong, the loss of Ivan Reis would still be a serious blow to this young series. With Rebirth nearing its one-year anniversary, it's painfully clear that DC still hasn't gotten any better about giving artists sufficient lead time on new assignments. This time, Diogenes Neves fills in for Reis. This issue is at least an improvement on the clearly rushed issue #2. Neves' line-work is sleek and confident. But the art still lacks the energy of Reis' issues, and also his unique talent for extracting the maximum emotion out of every panel.

Home  |  Labs  |  Random  |   |  About  |  this is the sister site of Vintage Ad Browser

Comic book covers presented at Cover Browser are republished within a fair use context. Each gallery's images are © by their artist or comics publisher.

Justice League of America had two distinguishing qualities when it first launched early this year. It boasted a strong team dynamic and was bolstered by the always incredible work of Ivan Reis. Sadly, these most recent two issues have shown that there's not much left once you remove those two pieces from the equation. What began as a promising addition to the Rebirth lineup has quickly lost its footing.

You'd think the "JLA vs. Extremists" premise would at least allow writer Steve Orlando to play the more interesting personalities on each team against one another. The cover to this issue suggests a fun brawl between Lobo and Wolverine/Sabretooth analogue Tracer. But that confrontation doesn't really amount to much here. There's a lot of wasted potential with this conflict when it comes to characterization.

Even if the characterization remained as strong, the loss of Ivan Reis would still be a serious blow to this young series. With Rebirth nearing its one-year anniversary, it's painfully clear that DC still hasn't gotten any better about giving artists sufficient lead time on new assignments. This time, Diogenes Neves fills in for Reis. This issue is at least an improvement on the clearly rushed issue #2. Neves' line-work is sleek and confident. But the art still lacks the energy of Reis' issues, and also his unique talent for extracting the maximum emotion out of every panel.

Home  |  Labs  |  Random  |   |  About  |  this is the sister site of Vintage Ad Browser

Comic book covers presented at Cover Browser are republished within a fair use context. Each gallery's images are © by their artist or comics publisher.

This isn't actually the first issue of DC's new Justice League of America series, but it might as well be. Justice League of America Rebirth #1 was a very formulaic team-building story, which is all the more frustrating given the fact that this issue shows readers everything they need to know about the new JLA in itself. But the good news is that, freed of the need for setup, Justice League of America is already a stronger comic.

This series has two main selling points at this early stage - the quirky team lineup and Ivan Reis' artwork. The more action-oriented focus in this sophomore issue emphasizes both selling points. Reis could hardly have found a better home in his first ongoing DC Rebirth assignment. This is a team comprised of heroes who are physically powerful but much more flawed and human than the regular Justice League. That plays directly to Reis' storytelling strengths. He's able to craft figures that are as vibrant and emotional as they are powerful. This issue features several epic splash images, but often it's the more intimate, close-up panels that stand out the most.

Thankfully, this issue remains pretty consistent despite the fact that Reis' work is inked by three different artists. Reis' work also seems to gel much better with colorist Marcelo Maiolo than it did in the Rebirth issue. Perhaps that's down to experience, or maybe the simple fact that this is a much more colorful and chaotic issue. The rampant flames and scenes of property damage seem to bring out the best in Maiolo's color work.

The conclusion to “Panic In the Microverse” disappointed me, but if I’m being honest, I let my expectation of the story overrule my judgment of the issue itself. Do I feel the story had problems? Yes. Did it deserve a higher score than I gave it? Yes. But this is a new story, and I’ve had time to digest everything before stepping into this chapter.

“Panic in the Microverse” wrapped by revealing that Prometheus had received a wish by the Might Beyond the Mirror. He used the wish to restore his body following the events that occurred in Midnighter (which I highly recommend), and now that he’s back. Instead of seeking revenge against the man who crippled him though, he’s going after the most public symbol of justice: the JLA! And to do so, he’s going to use the League’s openness to the public to serve as their greatest downfall.

This issue kicks off with a documentarian, John Porter, covering the Justice League of America. He makes his way through the headquarters, and also interviews each League member. Noticeably absent, however, is Batman – who apparently is away on another mission. As Porter interviews each League member, it becomes clear that something isn’t right as Porter identifies opportunities within the team and explores them. Following the interview, an attack occurs on the base, and things take a turn for the worse.

Actor: Matthew Settle , Kimberly Oja , John Kassir , Michelle Hurd , Kenny Johnston , David Krumholtz , Elisa Donovan , Ron Pearson , David Ogden Stiers , Miguel Ferrer

Justice League of America had two distinguishing qualities when it first launched early this year. It boasted a strong team dynamic and was bolstered by the always incredible work of Ivan Reis. Sadly, these most recent two issues have shown that there's not much left once you remove those two pieces from the equation. What began as a promising addition to the Rebirth lineup has quickly lost its footing.

You'd think the "JLA vs. Extremists" premise would at least allow writer Steve Orlando to play the more interesting personalities on each team against one another. The cover to this issue suggests a fun brawl between Lobo and Wolverine/Sabretooth analogue Tracer. But that confrontation doesn't really amount to much here. There's a lot of wasted potential with this conflict when it comes to characterization.

Even if the characterization remained as strong, the loss of Ivan Reis would still be a serious blow to this young series. With Rebirth nearing its one-year anniversary, it's painfully clear that DC still hasn't gotten any better about giving artists sufficient lead time on new assignments. This time, Diogenes Neves fills in for Reis. This issue is at least an improvement on the clearly rushed issue #2. Neves' line-work is sleek and confident. But the art still lacks the energy of Reis' issues, and also his unique talent for extracting the maximum emotion out of every panel.

Home  |  Labs  |  Random  |   |  About  |  this is the sister site of Vintage Ad Browser

Comic book covers presented at Cover Browser are republished within a fair use context. Each gallery's images are © by their artist or comics publisher.

This isn't actually the first issue of DC's new Justice League of America series, but it might as well be. Justice League of America Rebirth #1 was a very formulaic team-building story, which is all the more frustrating given the fact that this issue shows readers everything they need to know about the new JLA in itself. But the good news is that, freed of the need for setup, Justice League of America is already a stronger comic.

This series has two main selling points at this early stage - the quirky team lineup and Ivan Reis' artwork. The more action-oriented focus in this sophomore issue emphasizes both selling points. Reis could hardly have found a better home in his first ongoing DC Rebirth assignment. This is a team comprised of heroes who are physically powerful but much more flawed and human than the regular Justice League. That plays directly to Reis' storytelling strengths. He's able to craft figures that are as vibrant and emotional as they are powerful. This issue features several epic splash images, but often it's the more intimate, close-up panels that stand out the most.

Thankfully, this issue remains pretty consistent despite the fact that Reis' work is inked by three different artists. Reis' work also seems to gel much better with colorist Marcelo Maiolo than it did in the Rebirth issue. Perhaps that's down to experience, or maybe the simple fact that this is a much more colorful and chaotic issue. The rampant flames and scenes of property damage seem to bring out the best in Maiolo's color work.

The conclusion to “Panic In the Microverse” disappointed me, but if I’m being honest, I let my expectation of the story overrule my judgment of the issue itself. Do I feel the story had problems? Yes. Did it deserve a higher score than I gave it? Yes. But this is a new story, and I’ve had time to digest everything before stepping into this chapter.

“Panic in the Microverse” wrapped by revealing that Prometheus had received a wish by the Might Beyond the Mirror. He used the wish to restore his body following the events that occurred in Midnighter (which I highly recommend), and now that he’s back. Instead of seeking revenge against the man who crippled him though, he’s going after the most public symbol of justice: the JLA! And to do so, he’s going to use the League’s openness to the public to serve as their greatest downfall.

This issue kicks off with a documentarian, John Porter, covering the Justice League of America. He makes his way through the headquarters, and also interviews each League member. Noticeably absent, however, is Batman – who apparently is away on another mission. As Porter interviews each League member, it becomes clear that something isn’t right as Porter identifies opportunities within the team and explores them. Following the interview, an attack occurs on the base, and things take a turn for the worse.

Justice League of America (Team) - Comic Vine


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Posted by 2018 article

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