In this series of games, your students will learn about Earth’s geological history, the maps that scientists use to model it, and the evidence that helps them create those maps. The Plate Tectonics learning objective — based on NGSS and state standards — delivers improved student engagement and academic performance in your classroom, as demonstrated by research .

Earth’s continents and ocean basins have changed a great deal over time. Geologists create historical maps to visualize this change.

Maps that depict the earth around 200 million years ago show the supercontinent Pangea, when all of Earth’s land masses were connected. Throughout the entire timeline of our planet, massive continents have split apart and smaller ones have shifted together, changing the shape of the land and ocean basins.

In this series of games, your students will learn about Earth’s geological history, the maps that scientists use to model it, and the evidence that helps them create those maps. The Plate Tectonics learning objective — based on NGSS and state standards — delivers improved student engagement and academic performance in your classroom, as demonstrated by research .

Earth’s continents and ocean basins have changed a great deal over time. Geologists create historical maps to visualize this change.

Maps that depict the earth around 200 million years ago show the supercontinent Pangea, when all of Earth’s land masses were connected. Throughout the entire timeline of our planet, massive continents have split apart and smaller ones have shifted together, changing the shape of the land and ocean basins.

“ Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us.” Carl Sagan was moved to lyricism by the pale blue dot that Voyager 1 photographed as it exited the solar system 27 years ago. The pale blue dot is precious, and lucky.

Not only does Earth lie in the ‘Goldilocks zone’ that allows water to exist in the liquid form that life requires. It is also the only rocky planet we know of that constantly renovates its surface as its tectonic plates dive into the mantle in some places and re-emerge as molten lava in others. Many astrobiologists now think this constant renewal is just as important as liquid water for the flourishing of life as we know it.

Among the rocky worlds we know, Earth’s tectonics are unique. Venus and Mercury have no similar geological activity. Mars might have once, but not for billions of years. So why are we so lucky?

This map, published in 2006 by the  U.S. Geological Survey , gives much more detail than the  basic plate map . It shows 21 of the major plates, as well as their movements and boundaries. Convergent (colliding) boundaries are shown as a black line with teeth, divergent (spreading) boundaries as solid red lines and transform (sliding alongside) boundaries as solid black lines.

Diffuse boundaries, which are broad zones of deformation, are highlighted in pink. They are generally areas of  orogeny  or mountain building.  

The teeth along the convergent boundaries mark the upper side, which is overriding the other side. The convergent boundaries correspond to subduction zones  where an oceanic plate is involved. Where two continental plates collide, neither is dense enough to subduct below the other. Instead, the crust thickens and forms large mountain chains and plateaus.

4.  Describe in your own words how the Earth's layers were formed.  "The Four Layers" will help you.


Explain to your class that they will be working in three centers for science over the next few weeks. They need a science notebook, a pencil, and colored pencils daily. Some days they will need more lab equipment.  


Follow the same lesson plan for day one. Start the groups at a different center each day.  

Day Three-

Materials: 

In this series of games, your students will learn about Earth’s geological history, the maps that scientists use to model it, and the evidence that helps them create those maps. The Plate Tectonics learning objective — based on NGSS and state standards — delivers improved student engagement and academic performance in your classroom, as demonstrated by research .

Earth’s continents and ocean basins have changed a great deal over time. Geologists create historical maps to visualize this change.

Maps that depict the earth around 200 million years ago show the supercontinent Pangea, when all of Earth’s land masses were connected. Throughout the entire timeline of our planet, massive continents have split apart and smaller ones have shifted together, changing the shape of the land and ocean basins.

“ Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us.” Carl Sagan was moved to lyricism by the pale blue dot that Voyager 1 photographed as it exited the solar system 27 years ago. The pale blue dot is precious, and lucky.

Not only does Earth lie in the ‘Goldilocks zone’ that allows water to exist in the liquid form that life requires. It is also the only rocky planet we know of that constantly renovates its surface as its tectonic plates dive into the mantle in some places and re-emerge as molten lava in others. Many astrobiologists now think this constant renewal is just as important as liquid water for the flourishing of life as we know it.

Among the rocky worlds we know, Earth’s tectonics are unique. Venus and Mercury have no similar geological activity. Mars might have once, but not for billions of years. So why are we so lucky?

This map, published in 2006 by the  U.S. Geological Survey , gives much more detail than the  basic plate map . It shows 21 of the major plates, as well as their movements and boundaries. Convergent (colliding) boundaries are shown as a black line with teeth, divergent (spreading) boundaries as solid red lines and transform (sliding alongside) boundaries as solid black lines.

Diffuse boundaries, which are broad zones of deformation, are highlighted in pink. They are generally areas of  orogeny  or mountain building.  

The teeth along the convergent boundaries mark the upper side, which is overriding the other side. The convergent boundaries correspond to subduction zones  where an oceanic plate is involved. Where two continental plates collide, neither is dense enough to subduct below the other. Instead, the crust thickens and forms large mountain chains and plateaus.

In this series of games, your students will learn about Earth’s geological history, the maps that scientists use to model it, and the evidence that helps them create those maps. The Plate Tectonics learning objective — based on NGSS and state standards — delivers improved student engagement and academic performance in your classroom, as demonstrated by research .

Earth’s continents and ocean basins have changed a great deal over time. Geologists create historical maps to visualize this change.

Maps that depict the earth around 200 million years ago show the supercontinent Pangea, when all of Earth’s land masses were connected. Throughout the entire timeline of our planet, massive continents have split apart and smaller ones have shifted together, changing the shape of the land and ocean basins.

“ Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us.” Carl Sagan was moved to lyricism by the pale blue dot that Voyager 1 photographed as it exited the solar system 27 years ago. The pale blue dot is precious, and lucky.

Not only does Earth lie in the ‘Goldilocks zone’ that allows water to exist in the liquid form that life requires. It is also the only rocky planet we know of that constantly renovates its surface as its tectonic plates dive into the mantle in some places and re-emerge as molten lava in others. Many astrobiologists now think this constant renewal is just as important as liquid water for the flourishing of life as we know it.

Among the rocky worlds we know, Earth’s tectonics are unique. Venus and Mercury have no similar geological activity. Mars might have once, but not for billions of years. So why are we so lucky?

Home | Missouri State Tectonics


State Tectonics by Malka Older, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble®

Posted by 2018 article