On occasions our play extended in the early evening, or throughout the Sunday lunch period, when crickets of all shapes and persuasions would be passing up and down the steps into the Hall, on their way to liquid refreshment. Paddy Howe deigned to join us from time to time (after four or five pints of Trophy, probably) putting my bolwing clean over the garden and into the car park beyond (no change there) and pulling Chris’s long hops into the wall bounding the tennis courts with repeated savagery.

“Why do you have to keep hitting it there?” Chris finally enquired in exasperation as the ragged lump was handed back to him.

“Why do you have to keep bowling it there?” was Paddy’s phlegmatic response. Anyway, suffice it to say that our antics were noted , with the appropriate degree of good natured condescension and, though I’ve no evidence to support it this hypothesis, I would guess a certain amount of gossipin the bar was generated by our apparent enthusiasm for the game. I can imagine the words “seem keen” cropping up quite a bit, in fact. Personally speaking, I had no ambitions in terms of donning white and all the rest of it, but perhaps some amongst us had and were keeping quiet about it. There was soon to be evidence o this dangerous tendency.

On occasions our play extended in the early evening, or throughout the Sunday lunch period, when crickets of all shapes and persuasions would be passing up and down the steps into the Hall, on their way to liquid refreshment. Paddy Howe deigned to join us from time to time (after four or five pints of Trophy, probably) putting my bolwing clean over the garden and into the car park beyond (no change there) and pulling Chris’s long hops into the wall bounding the tennis courts with repeated savagery.

“Why do you have to keep hitting it there?” Chris finally enquired in exasperation as the ragged lump was handed back to him.

“Why do you have to keep bowling it there?” was Paddy’s phlegmatic response. Anyway, suffice it to say that our antics were noted , with the appropriate degree of good natured condescension and, though I’ve no evidence to support it this hypothesis, I would guess a certain amount of gossipin the bar was generated by our apparent enthusiasm for the game. I can imagine the words “seem keen” cropping up quite a bit, in fact. Personally speaking, I had no ambitions in terms of donning white and all the rest of it, but perhaps some amongst us had and were keeping quiet about it. There was soon to be evidence o this dangerous tendency.

Because the 18th Amendment and the Volstead Act did not make it illegal to drink alcohol, only to manufacture and sell it, many people stockpiled liquor before the ban went into effect. Rumor had it that the Yale Club in New York City had a 14-year supply of booze in its basement.

During the 1920s, many Americans had extra money to spend, and they spent it on consumer goods such as ready-to-wear clothes and home appliances like electric refrigerators. In particular, they bought radios. The first commercial radio station in the U.S., Pittsburgh’s KDKA, hit the airwaves in 1920; three years later there were more than 500 stations in the nation. By the end of the 1920s, there were radios in more than 12 million households. People also went to the movies: Historians estimate that, by the end of the decades, three-quarters of the American population visited a movie theater every week.

But the most important consumer product of the 1920s was the automobile. Low prices (the Ford Model T cost just $260 in 1924) and generous credit made cars affordable luxuries at the beginning of the decade; by the end, they were practically necessities. In 1929 there was one car on the road for every five Americans. Meanwhile, an economy of automobiles was born: Businesses like service stations and motels sprang up to meet drivers’ needs.

On occasions our play extended in the early evening, or throughout the Sunday lunch period, when crickets of all shapes and persuasions would be passing up and down the steps into the Hall, on their way to liquid refreshment. Paddy Howe deigned to join us from time to time (after four or five pints of Trophy, probably) putting my bolwing clean over the garden and into the car park beyond (no change there) and pulling Chris’s long hops into the wall bounding the tennis courts with repeated savagery.

“Why do you have to keep hitting it there?” Chris finally enquired in exasperation as the ragged lump was handed back to him.

“Why do you have to keep bowling it there?” was Paddy’s phlegmatic response. Anyway, suffice it to say that our antics were noted , with the appropriate degree of good natured condescension and, though I’ve no evidence to support it this hypothesis, I would guess a certain amount of gossipin the bar was generated by our apparent enthusiasm for the game. I can imagine the words “seem keen” cropping up quite a bit, in fact. Personally speaking, I had no ambitions in terms of donning white and all the rest of it, but perhaps some amongst us had and were keeping quiet about it. There was soon to be evidence o this dangerous tendency.

Because the 18th Amendment and the Volstead Act did not make it illegal to drink alcohol, only to manufacture and sell it, many people stockpiled liquor before the ban went into effect. Rumor had it that the Yale Club in New York City had a 14-year supply of booze in its basement.

During the 1920s, many Americans had extra money to spend, and they spent it on consumer goods such as ready-to-wear clothes and home appliances like electric refrigerators. In particular, they bought radios. The first commercial radio station in the U.S., Pittsburgh’s KDKA, hit the airwaves in 1920; three years later there were more than 500 stations in the nation. By the end of the 1920s, there were radios in more than 12 million households. People also went to the movies: Historians estimate that, by the end of the decades, three-quarters of the American population visited a movie theater every week.

But the most important consumer product of the 1920s was the automobile. Low prices (the Ford Model T cost just $260 in 1924) and generous credit made cars affordable luxuries at the beginning of the decade; by the end, they were practically necessities. In 1929 there was one car on the road for every five Americans. Meanwhile, an economy of automobiles was born: Businesses like service stations and motels sprang up to meet drivers’ needs.

Country (or country and western ) is a musical genre that originated in the southern United States in the early 1920s. [1] It takes its roots from genres such as folk music (especially Appalachian folk music ) and blues .

Country music often consists of ballads and dance tunes with generally simple forms, folk lyric and harmonies accompanied by mostly string instruments such as banjos , electric and acoustic guitars , steel guitars (such as pedal steels and dobros ), and fiddles as well as harmonicas . [2] [3] [4] Blues modes have been used extensively throughout its recorded history . [5]

According to Lindsey Starnes, the term country music gained popularity in the 1940s in preference to the earlier term hillbilly music ; it came to encompass Western music , which evolved parallel to hillbilly music from similar roots, in the mid-20th century. In 2009, in the United States country music was the most listened to rush hour radio genre during the evening commute, and second most popular in the morning commute. [6]

Roaring Boys | eightiesvinyl


Flatrock plains/roaring plains area of Dolly Sods, April.

Posted by 2018 article

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