….. I was asked this on Twitter recently and you can’t answer that question in 140 characters! It’s just not that easily answered but it’s a great question – it depends on these factors:

Where on the body your new ink is.
Clothes can rub on the new tattoo – different fabrics will be more harsh than others – denims, tight clothes, leggings – leggings have rubbery elastic through them, that can really irritate a new tattoo and prolong the healing process – it’s a really good idea to wear loose cotton clothing.  Rubbing in general will irritate the new tattoo -cover it during your working day if necessary – making sure you uncover and wash it as soon as you are home again (so it can breathe) and reapply TINKture.

If you have an ongoing health condition – accept that healing a tattoo may take longer than someone who is healthy.  I highly recommend you spend a week or two before your appointment building your immunity.  It can make a huge difference (I’m speaking from experience).  This is the product I use 1-2 weeks before an inking session if I’ve been sick or am having sittings close together – Le’Esscience Chill out & Boost .  I have recently recommended this to a lovely lady who experiences reactions to tattoo inks – when she uses this daily a week or two before her tattoo session, the reaction symptoms don’t happen!

She finally realized she had to do something because she couldn’t continue this way after she married and had children. Her first attempt at addressing her situation was to attend a Loss of Parent bereavement support group. However, she could go only once. As she later told me, she was embarrassed that she was in the same place in her mourning as others whose parent had died only six months earlier. It was as if her mourning had gone no further from where it was 5.5 years ago. She was stuck, and no more time would have eased or erased her grief. Time had done nothing for her; time had NOT been her friend.

After six months of counseling she worked through what she had been running from for over 5 years and found peace with her father’s death. Her frantic behaviors have ceased and now, she is a fully functioning young woman with plans for getting married next year.

The point here, though, is that time does NOT heal all wounds. A more apt saying is “IT’S WHAT YOU DO WITH THE TIME THAT HEALS.” Like any other aspect of life, mourning is an active, working process, not a passive one.

Neck and back injury healing goes through stages, each with their own characteristics. Different things are happening at the injury site in each unique phase; this means that your exercise choice and activity level will likely vary depending on how long it's been since you've injured yourself.

Also called the inflammatory stage, the acute stage occurs at the time of the injury, and usually continues for up to almost a week. During the acute stage, symptoms of  inflammation , which include redness, swelling, pain at rest and loss of function will likely occur.

The inflammation and pain during this first phase are caused by chemicals that are released into the area in response to the damaged tissues. These chemicals are meant to immobilize the region in order to help it heal.  But they can also cause pain and serve as a part of a feedback mechanism that signals swelling to continue.

….. I was asked this on Twitter recently and you can’t answer that question in 140 characters! It’s just not that easily answered but it’s a great question – it depends on these factors:

Where on the body your new ink is.
Clothes can rub on the new tattoo – different fabrics will be more harsh than others – denims, tight clothes, leggings – leggings have rubbery elastic through them, that can really irritate a new tattoo and prolong the healing process – it’s a really good idea to wear loose cotton clothing.  Rubbing in general will irritate the new tattoo -cover it during your working day if necessary – making sure you uncover and wash it as soon as you are home again (so it can breathe) and reapply TINKture.

If you have an ongoing health condition – accept that healing a tattoo may take longer than someone who is healthy.  I highly recommend you spend a week or two before your appointment building your immunity.  It can make a huge difference (I’m speaking from experience).  This is the product I use 1-2 weeks before an inking session if I’ve been sick or am having sittings close together – Le’Esscience Chill out & Boost .  I have recently recommended this to a lovely lady who experiences reactions to tattoo inks – when she uses this daily a week or two before her tattoo session, the reaction symptoms don’t happen!

She finally realized she had to do something because she couldn’t continue this way after she married and had children. Her first attempt at addressing her situation was to attend a Loss of Parent bereavement support group. However, she could go only once. As she later told me, she was embarrassed that she was in the same place in her mourning as others whose parent had died only six months earlier. It was as if her mourning had gone no further from where it was 5.5 years ago. She was stuck, and no more time would have eased or erased her grief. Time had done nothing for her; time had NOT been her friend.

After six months of counseling she worked through what she had been running from for over 5 years and found peace with her father’s death. Her frantic behaviors have ceased and now, she is a fully functioning young woman with plans for getting married next year.

The point here, though, is that time does NOT heal all wounds. A more apt saying is “IT’S WHAT YOU DO WITH THE TIME THAT HEALS.” Like any other aspect of life, mourning is an active, working process, not a passive one.

….. I was asked this on Twitter recently and you can’t answer that question in 140 characters! It’s just not that easily answered but it’s a great question – it depends on these factors:

Where on the body your new ink is.
Clothes can rub on the new tattoo – different fabrics will be more harsh than others – denims, tight clothes, leggings – leggings have rubbery elastic through them, that can really irritate a new tattoo and prolong the healing process – it’s a really good idea to wear loose cotton clothing.  Rubbing in general will irritate the new tattoo -cover it during your working day if necessary – making sure you uncover and wash it as soon as you are home again (so it can breathe) and reapply TINKture.

If you have an ongoing health condition – accept that healing a tattoo may take longer than someone who is healthy.  I highly recommend you spend a week or two before your appointment building your immunity.  It can make a huge difference (I’m speaking from experience).  This is the product I use 1-2 weeks before an inking session if I’ve been sick or am having sittings close together – Le’Esscience Chill out & Boost .  I have recently recommended this to a lovely lady who experiences reactions to tattoo inks – when she uses this daily a week or two before her tattoo session, the reaction symptoms don’t happen!

She finally realized she had to do something because she couldn’t continue this way after she married and had children. Her first attempt at addressing her situation was to attend a Loss of Parent bereavement support group. However, she could go only once. As she later told me, she was embarrassed that she was in the same place in her mourning as others whose parent had died only six months earlier. It was as if her mourning had gone no further from where it was 5.5 years ago. She was stuck, and no more time would have eased or erased her grief. Time had done nothing for her; time had NOT been her friend.

After six months of counseling she worked through what she had been running from for over 5 years and found peace with her father’s death. Her frantic behaviors have ceased and now, she is a fully functioning young woman with plans for getting married next year.

The point here, though, is that time does NOT heal all wounds. A more apt saying is “IT’S WHAT YOU DO WITH THE TIME THAT HEALS.” Like any other aspect of life, mourning is an active, working process, not a passive one.

Neck and back injury healing goes through stages, each with their own characteristics. Different things are happening at the injury site in each unique phase; this means that your exercise choice and activity level will likely vary depending on how long it's been since you've injured yourself.

Also called the inflammatory stage, the acute stage occurs at the time of the injury, and usually continues for up to almost a week. During the acute stage, symptoms of  inflammation , which include redness, swelling, pain at rest and loss of function will likely occur.

The inflammation and pain during this first phase are caused by chemicals that are released into the area in response to the damaged tissues. These chemicals are meant to immobilize the region in order to help it heal.  But they can also cause pain and serve as a part of a feedback mechanism that signals swelling to continue.

Time To Heal works “by any means necessary” to help clients get healthy and stay healthy, body/mind/spirit. From physical aliments, illnesses and injuries to addictions, family counselling and behavioural workshops the team at Time To Heal works hard to meet the varied needs of their clients. The community of clients gives back by supporting each other in maintaining a stable and gratitude focused life as they each work towards their own heart’s desires.

Time to Heal Treatment & Workshop Facility is a community of socially conscious, positively focused individuals who strive to enhance their healing skills and in return offer community an effective program of spirits feeding other spirits positive healing energy. Time to Heal is a treatment centre designed to help humanity maintain balance in an unbalanced world. We welcome all healing practices within practical and healthy reason to help improve our fellow person. Our intention is to guide the growth of healthy community and interaction to create a ripple effect of positive.

 

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