A second vocation in the second half of one's life. An encore career seeks to combine a sense of purpose with public-service passion and a paycheck for people in their 50s and 60s, according to Encore.org, a nonprofit organization founded by social entrepreneur Marc Freedman. While encore careers can be found in any sector, they tend to be clustered in five areas – healthcare, the environment, education, government and the nonprofit sector. The term "encore career" is believed to have been popularized by Freedman.

L ucy Kellaway, associate editor of the Financial Times , has made news by announcing that, after three decades as a journalist, she is switching careers . Aged 57, she is to train to become a maths teacher. She also plans to work with a charity, Now Teach , to persuade others in midlife and older to follow her example and have what in the US is called an encore career.

“It’s one of the best jobs in the world but I’m not getting any better at it,” Kellaway said of her years in journalism. “I’m part of the lucky generation that’s paid off mortgages and has a pension. I can afford to do something that tangibly improves people’s lives.”

Not everyone, of course, is in what Kellaway describes as this “demographic sweet spot”: financially secure for life so they can make an occupational shift that may bring rich rewards but not pay the bills.

A second vocation in the second half of one's life. An encore career seeks to combine a sense of purpose with public-service passion and a paycheck for people in their 50s and 60s, according to Encore.org, a nonprofit organization founded by social entrepreneur Marc Freedman. While encore careers can be found in any sector, they tend to be clustered in five areas – healthcare, the environment, education, government and the nonprofit sector. The term "encore career" is believed to have been popularized by Freedman.

L ucy Kellaway, associate editor of the Financial Times , has made news by announcing that, after three decades as a journalist, she is switching careers . Aged 57, she is to train to become a maths teacher. She also plans to work with a charity, Now Teach , to persuade others in midlife and older to follow her example and have what in the US is called an encore career.

“It’s one of the best jobs in the world but I’m not getting any better at it,” Kellaway said of her years in journalism. “I’m part of the lucky generation that’s paid off mortgages and has a pension. I can afford to do something that tangibly improves people’s lives.”

Not everyone, of course, is in what Kellaway describes as this “demographic sweet spot”: financially secure for life so they can make an occupational shift that may bring rich rewards but not pay the bills.

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Many people over 50 hope to use their later years to make a difference in the world — as volunteers, nonprofit employees or social entrepreneurs. Yet all too often, the path to finding meaningful encore work proves more challenging than expected.

I thought a lot about this while attending Encore 2016 , a recent Encore.org gathering of 400+ encore-movement leaders and advocates in San Francisco. It was my second year in attendance, and once again, I was awed by the incredible achievements of the Purpose Prize winners featured at the conference. It was impossible not to be moved. As my editor, Richard Eisenberg wrote in his Next Avenue blog post, The Encore Career Movement Grows Up , “There’s nothing more inspiring that being surrounded by inspiring people.”

A second vocation in the second half of one's life. An encore career seeks to combine a sense of purpose with public-service passion and a paycheck for people in their 50s and 60s, according to Encore.org, a nonprofit organization founded by social entrepreneur Marc Freedman. While encore careers can be found in any sector, they tend to be clustered in five areas – healthcare, the environment, education, government and the nonprofit sector. The term "encore career" is believed to have been popularized by Freedman.

A second vocation in the second half of one's life. An encore career seeks to combine a sense of purpose with public-service passion and a paycheck for people in their 50s and 60s, according to Encore.org, a nonprofit organization founded by social entrepreneur Marc Freedman. While encore careers can be found in any sector, they tend to be clustered in five areas – healthcare, the environment, education, government and the nonprofit sector. The term "encore career" is believed to have been popularized by Freedman.

L ucy Kellaway, associate editor of the Financial Times , has made news by announcing that, after three decades as a journalist, she is switching careers . Aged 57, she is to train to become a maths teacher. She also plans to work with a charity, Now Teach , to persuade others in midlife and older to follow her example and have what in the US is called an encore career.

“It’s one of the best jobs in the world but I’m not getting any better at it,” Kellaway said of her years in journalism. “I’m part of the lucky generation that’s paid off mortgages and has a pension. I can afford to do something that tangibly improves people’s lives.”

Not everyone, of course, is in what Kellaway describes as this “demographic sweet spot”: financially secure for life so they can make an occupational shift that may bring rich rewards but not pay the bills.

Your location has mapped you to the following local PBS station(s). Please select one below or choose not to localize right now .

Many people over 50 hope to use their later years to make a difference in the world — as volunteers, nonprofit employees or social entrepreneurs. Yet all too often, the path to finding meaningful encore work proves more challenging than expected.

I thought a lot about this while attending Encore 2016 , a recent Encore.org gathering of 400+ encore-movement leaders and advocates in San Francisco. It was my second year in attendance, and once again, I was awed by the incredible achievements of the Purpose Prize winners featured at the conference. It was impossible not to be moved. As my editor, Richard Eisenberg wrote in his Next Avenue blog post, The Encore Career Movement Grows Up , “There’s nothing more inspiring that being surrounded by inspiring people.”

Aging baby boomers, coupled with early retirement incentives designed to reduce salary loads, are swelling the ranks of retired public service professionals.  Despite this crop of 60’s era retirees’ declaration that they would not toil into their advanced years like their parents’ generation, and notwithstanding generous pensions, many pursue encore careers.  Motives may include bolstering financial security, sharing the wisdom and knowledge gained from decades of experience, or merely remaining active and vibrant.

Whatever the reasons, freedom from the constraints of supporting young families and building financial security for the future, encore careers can provide opportunities that are both unique and deeply satisfying.  They can include self-employment, full-time, part-time or temporary employment or consulting.  Travel or relocate. Work principally with your hands instead of your mind. Sell, teach, mentor, intern or apprentice. Convert a hobby or a passion into a business. Abandon the city for the country. Leave the ground and take to the skies. Join the circus.

Like so many others, I chose the less glamorous but practical and still-agreeable option of going back to my public service roots following my 2005 retirement as a City Manager.  I found that not all respect has been ceded to youth and giving back is as gratifying as billed. I learned there is truth in the adage “an expert is a fool who is a long way from home”—-and realized that the liberation accompanying encore careers cuts both ways.

Encore career - Wikipedia


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Posted by 2018 article

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