Hello, I am very sorry to hear about Princess. I do need a little more information so I can guide you. No further charge, it will just get you a more specific answer for her problem.

If she is around other dogs at all a respiratory infection, especially kennel cough can lead to a hacking cough which can be so severe that they vomit at the end. Sometimes they vomit food, but often it's just mucous. They will often be fine when resting but any sort of excitement, play or barking, leads to a cough. Most of the time these dogs feel pretty well so it's a matter of keeping them quiet and suppressing the cough if we can. If the cough is very bad you can use human cough/cold medications with Guaifenesin (an expectorant) and Dextromethorphan (a cough suppressant) only such as Benylin or Robitussin DM can help. Give 1 teaspoon per 20 to 25 pounds every 6 hours.

Take her into the bathroom with you when you run a hot steamy shower or bath or use a humidifier as breathing moist air soothes the airways and can ease her cough.

FBRN has lost a legend. We received word last week that Magnolia, our hospice foster, passed away after a short bout of pneumonia. To say we are heartbroken is an understatement. Magnolia came to FBRN in March of 2012, and was a part of the organization for longer than many of our current volunteers. During the time she was with us, we came to know and love her through her foster mom’s frequent updates. By the time she left us last week, she had become “our” dog.

Magnolia came to FBRN at the age of six, and was quite a sight when she arrived. She was unspayed, her ears were crusty and infected, and she was missing an eye. Her foster mom was told that Magnolia was “supposedly bossy,” but other than that, she knew little about her.

Turns out that underneath a seemingly serious, nervous and standoffish exterior was a sweet, loving Frenchie girl. She loved her humans, adored her foster sibling Bruno, and relished fresh donuts (Munchkins, to be exact). Magnolia enjoyed watching TV with her people, and playing with her toys.

Hello, I am very sorry to hear about Princess. I do need a little more information so I can guide you. No further charge, it will just get you a more specific answer for her problem.

If she is around other dogs at all a respiratory infection, especially kennel cough can lead to a hacking cough which can be so severe that they vomit at the end. Sometimes they vomit food, but often it's just mucous. They will often be fine when resting but any sort of excitement, play or barking, leads to a cough. Most of the time these dogs feel pretty well so it's a matter of keeping them quiet and suppressing the cough if we can. If the cough is very bad you can use human cough/cold medications with Guaifenesin (an expectorant) and Dextromethorphan (a cough suppressant) only such as Benylin or Robitussin DM can help. Give 1 teaspoon per 20 to 25 pounds every 6 hours.

Take her into the bathroom with you when you run a hot steamy shower or bath or use a humidifier as breathing moist air soothes the airways and can ease her cough.

Hello, I am very sorry to hear about Princess. I do need a little more information so I can guide you. No further charge, it will just get you a more specific answer for her problem.

If she is around other dogs at all a respiratory infection, especially kennel cough can lead to a hacking cough which can be so severe that they vomit at the end. Sometimes they vomit food, but often it's just mucous. They will often be fine when resting but any sort of excitement, play or barking, leads to a cough. Most of the time these dogs feel pretty well so it's a matter of keeping them quiet and suppressing the cough if we can. If the cough is very bad you can use human cough/cold medications with Guaifenesin (an expectorant) and Dextromethorphan (a cough suppressant) only such as Benylin or Robitussin DM can help. Give 1 teaspoon per 20 to 25 pounds every 6 hours.

Take her into the bathroom with you when you run a hot steamy shower or bath or use a humidifier as breathing moist air soothes the airways and can ease her cough.

FBRN has lost a legend. We received word last week that Magnolia, our hospice foster, passed away after a short bout of pneumonia. To say we are heartbroken is an understatement. Magnolia came to FBRN in March of 2012, and was a part of the organization for longer than many of our current volunteers. During the time she was with us, we came to know and love her through her foster mom’s frequent updates. By the time she left us last week, she had become “our” dog.

Magnolia came to FBRN at the age of six, and was quite a sight when she arrived. She was unspayed, her ears were crusty and infected, and she was missing an eye. Her foster mom was told that Magnolia was “supposedly bossy,” but other than that, she knew little about her.

Turns out that underneath a seemingly serious, nervous and standoffish exterior was a sweet, loving Frenchie girl. She loved her humans, adored her foster sibling Bruno, and relished fresh donuts (Munchkins, to be exact). Magnolia enjoyed watching TV with her people, and playing with her toys.

Much has been made recently about the Bulldog, French Bulldog, Pug and other brachycaphalic breeds and their ability to breathe. Many vets are now so anti Bulldog it's not unusual for people to take their dog to the vet for the first time and be scared stupid into sending it back, so here's our take on it.

Does that mean the dog is suffering though? Is there a difference between a noisy breather? and a dog that actually cannot breathe at all? Well we think there is. Many vets will have you beleive that the snoring is a sign of suffering - well my husband snores does that mean he should be banned? I've seen hundreds of bulldogs, some make a noise, most don't, nearly all of them snore BUT I've seen dogs who's throats don't close up just because they are noisy breathers too. No one wants a living creature to suffer, if the dog cannot be a dog and has a compromised quality of life then of course we should consider the future of that dog - but as a breed?

We are very concerned that because the media are so intent on telling the world all bulldogs can't breath, owners of dogs who really can't breathe have no idea their dog is suffering at all and susbsquently are not getting the medical treatment they need. Others are having expensive and life threatening surgery done on dogs that don't need it simply because it's a bulldog.

Hello, I am very sorry to hear about Princess. I do need a little more information so I can guide you. No further charge, it will just get you a more specific answer for her problem.

If she is around other dogs at all a respiratory infection, especially kennel cough can lead to a hacking cough which can be so severe that they vomit at the end. Sometimes they vomit food, but often it's just mucous. They will often be fine when resting but any sort of excitement, play or barking, leads to a cough. Most of the time these dogs feel pretty well so it's a matter of keeping them quiet and suppressing the cough if we can. If the cough is very bad you can use human cough/cold medications with Guaifenesin (an expectorant) and Dextromethorphan (a cough suppressant) only such as Benylin or Robitussin DM can help. Give 1 teaspoon per 20 to 25 pounds every 6 hours.

Take her into the bathroom with you when you run a hot steamy shower or bath or use a humidifier as breathing moist air soothes the airways and can ease her cough.

FBRN has lost a legend. We received word last week that Magnolia, our hospice foster, passed away after a short bout of pneumonia. To say we are heartbroken is an understatement. Magnolia came to FBRN in March of 2012, and was a part of the organization for longer than many of our current volunteers. During the time she was with us, we came to know and love her through her foster mom’s frequent updates. By the time she left us last week, she had become “our” dog.

Magnolia came to FBRN at the age of six, and was quite a sight when she arrived. She was unspayed, her ears were crusty and infected, and she was missing an eye. Her foster mom was told that Magnolia was “supposedly bossy,” but other than that, she knew little about her.

Turns out that underneath a seemingly serious, nervous and standoffish exterior was a sweet, loving Frenchie girl. She loved her humans, adored her foster sibling Bruno, and relished fresh donuts (Munchkins, to be exact). Magnolia enjoyed watching TV with her people, and playing with her toys.

Much has been made recently about the Bulldog, French Bulldog, Pug and other brachycaphalic breeds and their ability to breathe. Many vets are now so anti Bulldog it's not unusual for people to take their dog to the vet for the first time and be scared stupid into sending it back, so here's our take on it.

Does that mean the dog is suffering though? Is there a difference between a noisy breather? and a dog that actually cannot breathe at all? Well we think there is. Many vets will have you beleive that the snoring is a sign of suffering - well my husband snores does that mean he should be banned? I've seen hundreds of bulldogs, some make a noise, most don't, nearly all of them snore BUT I've seen dogs who's throats don't close up just because they are noisy breathers too. No one wants a living creature to suffer, if the dog cannot be a dog and has a compromised quality of life then of course we should consider the future of that dog - but as a breed?

We are very concerned that because the media are so intent on telling the world all bulldogs can't breath, owners of dogs who really can't breathe have no idea their dog is suffering at all and susbsquently are not getting the medical treatment they need. Others are having expensive and life threatening surgery done on dogs that don't need it simply because it's a bulldog.

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