Uploaded by NicoleB-loader on July 23, 2010

Uploaded by Marlete Kurten on February 20, 2008

Uploaded by NicoleB-loader on July 23, 2010

Uploaded by NicoleB-loader on July 23, 2010

Uploaded by Marlete Kurten on February 20, 2008

Melmoth the Wanderer opens with a student, John Melmoth, leaving college to attend to his uncle’s deathbed in a house on a clifftop by the coast. John sees a painting of a distant relative on the wall, dated several centuries back – a painting with cold, dead eyes. John enquires about the subject, and his uncle tells him that “the original is still alive … you shall see him again”.

It becomes apparent that John’s ancestor, in proto-Dorian Gray fashion (it is no coincidence that Maturin was Oscar Wilde’s great-uncle) has made a Faustian pact with Satan for 150 extra years of life. However, unless Melmoth can convince someone to agree to take his place, at the end of the 150 years he will be consigned to burn in hell for eternity. Melmoth has all the devil’s powers at his disposal, and he spends his years roaming the earth, looking for someone to take the curse from him, moving in and out of locked cells, floating across seas and continents.

Melmoth is a gothic matryoshka of fictions inside one another, and the common thread is the Wanderer, moving through every level, never present but always there – spoken of in whispers and hearsay. He is terrifying in his absence, moving through a Daedelian nightmare of narrative strands that twine into one another. The novel is not linear, like “beads on a string” (an analogy he borrows from Aristotle) but instead, like the Wanderer, jumps back and forth – diabolically outside of time.

Oops. A firewall is blocking access to Prezi content. Check out this article to learn more or contact your system administrator.

Oops. A firewall is blocking access to Prezi content. Check out this article to learn more or contact your system administrator.

Uploaded by NicoleB-loader on July 23, 2010

Uploaded by Marlete Kurten on February 20, 2008

Melmoth the Wanderer opens with a student, John Melmoth, leaving college to attend to his uncle’s deathbed in a house on a clifftop by the coast. John sees a painting of a distant relative on the wall, dated several centuries back – a painting with cold, dead eyes. John enquires about the subject, and his uncle tells him that “the original is still alive … you shall see him again”.

It becomes apparent that John’s ancestor, in proto-Dorian Gray fashion (it is no coincidence that Maturin was Oscar Wilde’s great-uncle) has made a Faustian pact with Satan for 150 extra years of life. However, unless Melmoth can convince someone to agree to take his place, at the end of the 150 years he will be consigned to burn in hell for eternity. Melmoth has all the devil’s powers at his disposal, and he spends his years roaming the earth, looking for someone to take the curse from him, moving in and out of locked cells, floating across seas and continents.

Melmoth is a gothic matryoshka of fictions inside one another, and the common thread is the Wanderer, moving through every level, never present but always there – spoken of in whispers and hearsay. He is terrifying in his absence, moving through a Daedelian nightmare of narrative strands that twine into one another. The novel is not linear, like “beads on a string” (an analogy he borrows from Aristotle) but instead, like the Wanderer, jumps back and forth – diabolically outside of time.

Oops. A firewall is blocking access to Prezi content. Check out this article to learn more or contact your system administrator.

Uploaded by NicoleB-loader on July 23, 2010

Uploaded by Marlete Kurten on February 20, 2008

Melmoth the Wanderer opens with a student, John Melmoth, leaving college to attend to his uncle’s deathbed in a house on a clifftop by the coast. John sees a painting of a distant relative on the wall, dated several centuries back – a painting with cold, dead eyes. John enquires about the subject, and his uncle tells him that “the original is still alive … you shall see him again”.

It becomes apparent that John’s ancestor, in proto-Dorian Gray fashion (it is no coincidence that Maturin was Oscar Wilde’s great-uncle) has made a Faustian pact with Satan for 150 extra years of life. However, unless Melmoth can convince someone to agree to take his place, at the end of the 150 years he will be consigned to burn in hell for eternity. Melmoth has all the devil’s powers at his disposal, and he spends his years roaming the earth, looking for someone to take the curse from him, moving in and out of locked cells, floating across seas and continents.

Melmoth is a gothic matryoshka of fictions inside one another, and the common thread is the Wanderer, moving through every level, never present but always there – spoken of in whispers and hearsay. He is terrifying in his absence, moving through a Daedelian nightmare of narrative strands that twine into one another. The novel is not linear, like “beads on a string” (an analogy he borrows from Aristotle) but instead, like the Wanderer, jumps back and forth – diabolically outside of time.

Melmoth the Wanderer by Charles Maturin – a gothic.


Melmoth the Wanderer by Charles Robert Maturin - Goodreads

Posted by 2018 article

5162v0u9xaL