From Hans Christian Andersen to Angela Carter’s Bloody Chamber, Marina Warner picks her favourite fairytales

• Why we need fairytales: Jeanette Winterson on Oscar Wilde
• Read more from the top 10 books series

C onsolatory fantasies or wise counsel? Materialist lies or emancipatory dreams? Popular trash or the fundamental structure of imaginative literature? Fairytales still provoke vigorous argument. Advocates point to the way they ignite the imagination and spark hopes of liberty. Detractors attack their suspect artistic quality and their damaging social and moral effects. Both take up their positions on ethical grounds, because fairytales continue to dominate family entertainment in books and other media. They matter because young minds and the shaping of values are at stake. Yet what they mean and what effects they have remain open questions.

The most lingering and powerful tales don’t always have an original written text, but shapeshift through time, bobbing about on the streams of story. I’ve tried to choose 10 of the most inspiring, and include some of the great collectors; but as in any exercise of this kind, there are so many that I have had to leave out.

Amongst the one hundred folktales are such familiar tales as The Three Billy-Goats Gruff, Haensel and Gretel, Sleeping Beuaty, and some perhaps not so familiar, The Magic Bird, The Goose Girl, and The Pancake.

If you can buy only one fairytale book a year, buy this. Why? Because the chooser knows more about the folktales of all countries than anyone else in the world, and the choice is the flower of the flock." —New York Times Book Review

Just relax and enjoy these delightful tales from all over the world—or better yet, read them aloud to some of your favorite children." —Quartet

Uploaded by [email protected] on March 17, 2010

From Hans Christian Andersen to Angela Carter’s Bloody Chamber, Marina Warner picks her favourite fairytales

• Why we need fairytales: Jeanette Winterson on Oscar Wilde
• Read more from the top 10 books series

C onsolatory fantasies or wise counsel? Materialist lies or emancipatory dreams? Popular trash or the fundamental structure of imaginative literature? Fairytales still provoke vigorous argument. Advocates point to the way they ignite the imagination and spark hopes of liberty. Detractors attack their suspect artistic quality and their damaging social and moral effects. Both take up their positions on ethical grounds, because fairytales continue to dominate family entertainment in books and other media. They matter because young minds and the shaping of values are at stake. Yet what they mean and what effects they have remain open questions.

The most lingering and powerful tales don’t always have an original written text, but shapeshift through time, bobbing about on the streams of story. I’ve tried to choose 10 of the most inspiring, and include some of the great collectors; but as in any exercise of this kind, there are so many that I have had to leave out.

From Hans Christian Andersen to Angela Carter’s Bloody Chamber, Marina Warner picks her favourite fairytales

• Why we need fairytales: Jeanette Winterson on Oscar Wilde
• Read more from the top 10 books series

C onsolatory fantasies or wise counsel? Materialist lies or emancipatory dreams? Popular trash or the fundamental structure of imaginative literature? Fairytales still provoke vigorous argument. Advocates point to the way they ignite the imagination and spark hopes of liberty. Detractors attack their suspect artistic quality and their damaging social and moral effects. Both take up their positions on ethical grounds, because fairytales continue to dominate family entertainment in books and other media. They matter because young minds and the shaping of values are at stake. Yet what they mean and what effects they have remain open questions.

The most lingering and powerful tales don’t always have an original written text, but shapeshift through time, bobbing about on the streams of story. I’ve tried to choose 10 of the most inspiring, and include some of the great collectors; but as in any exercise of this kind, there are so many that I have had to leave out.

Amongst the one hundred folktales are such familiar tales as The Three Billy-Goats Gruff, Haensel and Gretel, Sleeping Beuaty, and some perhaps not so familiar, The Magic Bird, The Goose Girl, and The Pancake.

If you can buy only one fairytale book a year, buy this. Why? Because the chooser knows more about the folktales of all countries than anyone else in the world, and the choice is the flower of the flock." —New York Times Book Review

Just relax and enjoy these delightful tales from all over the world—or better yet, read them aloud to some of your favorite children." —Quartet

Amazon.com: favorite folk tales: Books


Favorite Folktales from Around the World (The Pantheon.

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