FAQ :  What is the history of opal? Are opals bad luck? Is opal bad luck? Why and when did superstition begin to surround opal?

For many years, the opal has tried to shake off rumours and wives tales about the stone bringing bad luck. Perpetuated by folk lore, mistaken identity, superstitions, family tales and disgruntled diamond traders, the opal has had a pretty tough life. As we entered the age of reason and science, this belief has somewhat fallen by the wayside, but a glimmer of the superstition still survives today. Of course, like any unprovable theory, you'll have to make up your own mind, but we've got our feet planted firmly in the non-believers camp. After all, we've owned and loved opals for over forty-five years and they've brought us nothing but good luck!

The folklore connected with crystals, gems, and precious stones is as old as it is varied. Much of this tradition dates back to the beginnings of civilization, when jewelry was worn not only as adornment but also as protection against occult forces and human foolishness. Amethyst, for example, was thought to sober drunks, quell sexual passion, and cure baldness. Aquamarine was believed to protect seafarers, while emeralds increased fertility and intelligence, imparted prophetic ability, and other wild talents. Rubies provided defense against every kind of misfortune, made hostile neighbors friendly, and promoted one's stature in the community.

FAQ :  What is the history of opal? Are opals bad luck? Is opal bad luck? Why and when did superstition begin to surround opal?

For many years, the opal has tried to shake off rumours and wives tales about the stone bringing bad luck. Perpetuated by folk lore, mistaken identity, superstitions, family tales and disgruntled diamond traders, the opal has had a pretty tough life. As we entered the age of reason and science, this belief has somewhat fallen by the wayside, but a glimmer of the superstition still survives today. Of course, like any unprovable theory, you'll have to make up your own mind, but we've got our feet planted firmly in the non-believers camp. After all, we've owned and loved opals for over forty-five years and they've brought us nothing but good luck!

The folklore connected with crystals, gems, and precious stones is as old as it is varied. Much of this tradition dates back to the beginnings of civilization, when jewelry was worn not only as adornment but also as protection against occult forces and human foolishness. Amethyst, for example, was thought to sober drunks, quell sexual passion, and cure baldness. Aquamarine was believed to protect seafarers, while emeralds increased fertility and intelligence, imparted prophetic ability, and other wild talents. Rubies provided defense against every kind of misfortune, made hostile neighbors friendly, and promoted one's stature in the community.

On my last post a comment raised the question on how Opals differ from Chrysocolla. It inspired me for my next post – so here it is : Opals. Opals are actually a whole genre of gemstones that contains many varieties, so I will only focus on the Fire Opal in this post (all pictures in this post are of Fire Opals). But first of, some general comments on Opals.

Opal is amorphous SiO2·nH2O, hydrated silicon dioxide, the water content sometimes being as high as 20% but is usually between three and ten percent. Opal ranges from clear through white, gray, red, yellow, green, shore, blue, magenta, brown, and black. Of these hues, red and black are the most rare and dear, whereas white and green are the most common.

The group of fine Opals includes quite a number of wonderful gemstones, which share one characteristic: they shine and sparkle in a continually changing play of colours full of fantasy, which experts describe as “opalising”. Depending on the kind, place of occurrence, and colour of the main body, we differentiate Dark or Black Opal, White or Light Opal, Milk or Crystal Opal, Boulder Opal, Opal Matrix, Yowah Nuts from Queensland – the so-called “picture stones“, and also Mexican and Fire Opal.

FAQ :  What is the history of opal? Are opals bad luck? Is opal bad luck? Why and when did superstition begin to surround opal?

For many years, the opal has tried to shake off rumours and wives tales about the stone bringing bad luck. Perpetuated by folk lore, mistaken identity, superstitions, family tales and disgruntled diamond traders, the opal has had a pretty tough life. As we entered the age of reason and science, this belief has somewhat fallen by the wayside, but a glimmer of the superstition still survives today. Of course, like any unprovable theory, you'll have to make up your own mind, but we've got our feet planted firmly in the non-believers camp. After all, we've owned and loved opals for over forty-five years and they've brought us nothing but good luck!

The folklore connected with crystals, gems, and precious stones is as old as it is varied. Much of this tradition dates back to the beginnings of civilization, when jewelry was worn not only as adornment but also as protection against occult forces and human foolishness. Amethyst, for example, was thought to sober drunks, quell sexual passion, and cure baldness. Aquamarine was believed to protect seafarers, while emeralds increased fertility and intelligence, imparted prophetic ability, and other wild talents. Rubies provided defense against every kind of misfortune, made hostile neighbors friendly, and promoted one's stature in the community.

On my last post a comment raised the question on how Opals differ from Chrysocolla. It inspired me for my next post – so here it is : Opals. Opals are actually a whole genre of gemstones that contains many varieties, so I will only focus on the Fire Opal in this post (all pictures in this post are of Fire Opals). But first of, some general comments on Opals.

Opal is amorphous SiO2·nH2O, hydrated silicon dioxide, the water content sometimes being as high as 20% but is usually between three and ten percent. Opal ranges from clear through white, gray, red, yellow, green, shore, blue, magenta, brown, and black. Of these hues, red and black are the most rare and dear, whereas white and green are the most common.

The group of fine Opals includes quite a number of wonderful gemstones, which share one characteristic: they shine and sparkle in a continually changing play of colours full of fantasy, which experts describe as “opalising”. Depending on the kind, place of occurrence, and colour of the main body, we differentiate Dark or Black Opal, White or Light Opal, Milk or Crystal Opal, Boulder Opal, Opal Matrix, Yowah Nuts from Queensland – the so-called “picture stones“, and also Mexican and Fire Opal.

Anne of Geierstein, or The Maiden of the Mist (1829) is a novel by Sir Walter Scott . It is set in Central Europe, mainly in Switzerland, shortly after the Yorkist victory at the Battle of Tewkesbury(1471). It covers the period of Swiss involvement in the Burgundian Wars.

Sir Walter Scott | Ornament Studio


Waverley Novels 12 Volumes: Ivanhoe and the Talisman; Rob.

Posted by 2018 article

512DxCVzu0L