The dan ( 段 ) ranking system is used by many Japanese organizations and Korean martial arts to indicate the level of one's ability within a certain subject matter. As a ranking system, it was originally used at a go school during the Edo period . [1] It is now also used in modern fine arts and martial arts .

The system was applied to martial arts in Japan by Kanō Jigorō (1860–1938), [2] the founder of judo , in 1883, and later introduced to other East Asian countries. [3] In the modern Japanese martial arts , holders of dan ranks often wear a black belt ; those of higher rank may also wear red-and-white and red belts . Dan ranks are also given for strategic board games such as go, Japanese chess ( shōgi ), and renju , as well as for cultural arts such as flower arrangement ( ikebana ), Japanese calligraphy ( shodō ) and tea ceremony ( sadō ). 

The Chinese character for the word dan (段) literally means step or stage in Japanese, but is also used to refer to one's rank or grade , i.e., one's degree or level of expertise and knowledge. In Chinese pinyin , however, the same character is spelled duàn , and was originally used to mean phase . Dan is often used together with the word kyū ( 級 ) in certain ranking systems, with dan being used for the higher ranks and kyū being used for lower ranks.

I Made Bogey is an online golf apparel company that sells products with slogans you’d expect to see on the Wildwood boardwalk . There are a series of t-shirts inspired by Happy Gilmore. There are red “MAKE GOLF GREAT AGAIN” hats. But the bulk of the products on the site are parodies of golf brand Titleist. Only instead of that brand’s name, it reads: “Titties.”

That angered Titleist. As Bloomberg reports, the company has filed a lawsuit against I Made Bogey citing unfair competition, trademark infringement and dilution.

The “Titties”—and “Titlelost” gear, which doesn’t seem to be for sale anymore—hats are a clear knockoff of the Titleist logo. But Bloomberg’s Polly Mosendz and Kim Bhasin explain that the Titleist might have an uphill battle with its claim:

The dan ( 段 ) ranking system is used by many Japanese organizations and Korean martial arts to indicate the level of one's ability within a certain subject matter. As a ranking system, it was originally used at a go school during the Edo period . [1] It is now also used in modern fine arts and martial arts .

The system was applied to martial arts in Japan by Kanō Jigorō (1860–1938), [2] the founder of judo , in 1883, and later introduced to other East Asian countries. [3] In the modern Japanese martial arts , holders of dan ranks often wear a black belt ; those of higher rank may also wear red-and-white and red belts . Dan ranks are also given for strategic board games such as go, Japanese chess ( shōgi ), and renju , as well as for cultural arts such as flower arrangement ( ikebana ), Japanese calligraphy ( shodō ) and tea ceremony ( sadō ). 

The Chinese character for the word dan (段) literally means step or stage in Japanese, but is also used to refer to one's rank or grade , i.e., one's degree or level of expertise and knowledge. In Chinese pinyin , however, the same character is spelled duàn , and was originally used to mean phase . Dan is often used together with the word kyū ( 級 ) in certain ranking systems, with dan being used for the higher ranks and kyū being used for lower ranks.

I Made Bogey is an online golf apparel company that sells products with slogans you’d expect to see on the Wildwood boardwalk . There are a series of t-shirts inspired by Happy Gilmore. There are red “MAKE GOLF GREAT AGAIN” hats. But the bulk of the products on the site are parodies of golf brand Titleist. Only instead of that brand’s name, it reads: “Titties.”

That angered Titleist. As Bloomberg reports, the company has filed a lawsuit against I Made Bogey citing unfair competition, trademark infringement and dilution.

The “Titties”—and “Titlelost” gear, which doesn’t seem to be for sale anymore—hats are a clear knockoff of the Titleist logo. But Bloomberg’s Polly Mosendz and Kim Bhasin explain that the Titleist might have an uphill battle with its claim:

1933 photo of Jigoro Kano (center) with 10th dans Kunisaburo Iizuka (front row second from left), Hajime Isogai (rear left), Hidekazu Nagaoka (rear row second from left), and Yoshitsugu (Yoshiaki) Yamashita (rear row second from right).

Note: in addition to these Kodokan 10th dans the International Judo Federation promoted Anton Geesink (NED) and Charles Palmer (UK) to 10th dan in 1997. Some countries have also made promotions to 10th dan, such as Henri Courtine in France in 2007, and Jaap Nauwelaerts de Agé in Holland in 2008.

The dan ( 段 ) ranking system is used by many Japanese organizations and Korean martial arts to indicate the level of one's ability within a certain subject matter. As a ranking system, it was originally used at a go school during the Edo period . [1] It is now also used in modern fine arts and martial arts .

The system was applied to martial arts in Japan by Kanō Jigorō (1860–1938), [2] the founder of judo , in 1883, and later introduced to other East Asian countries. [3] In the modern Japanese martial arts , holders of dan ranks often wear a black belt ; those of higher rank may also wear red-and-white and red belts . Dan ranks are also given for strategic board games such as go, Japanese chess ( shōgi ), and renju , as well as for cultural arts such as flower arrangement ( ikebana ), Japanese calligraphy ( shodō ) and tea ceremony ( sadō ). 

The Chinese character for the word dan (段) literally means step or stage in Japanese, but is also used to refer to one's rank or grade , i.e., one's degree or level of expertise and knowledge. In Chinese pinyin , however, the same character is spelled duàn , and was originally used to mean phase . Dan is often used together with the word kyū ( 級 ) in certain ranking systems, with dan being used for the higher ranks and kyū being used for lower ranks.

I Made Bogey is an online golf apparel company that sells products with slogans you’d expect to see on the Wildwood boardwalk . There are a series of t-shirts inspired by Happy Gilmore. There are red “MAKE GOLF GREAT AGAIN” hats. But the bulk of the products on the site are parodies of golf brand Titleist. Only instead of that brand’s name, it reads: “Titties.”

That angered Titleist. As Bloomberg reports, the company has filed a lawsuit against I Made Bogey citing unfair competition, trademark infringement and dilution.

The “Titties”—and “Titlelost” gear, which doesn’t seem to be for sale anymore—hats are a clear knockoff of the Titleist logo. But Bloomberg’s Polly Mosendz and Kim Bhasin explain that the Titleist might have an uphill battle with its claim:

1933 photo of Jigoro Kano (center) with 10th dans Kunisaburo Iizuka (front row second from left), Hajime Isogai (rear left), Hidekazu Nagaoka (rear row second from left), and Yoshitsugu (Yoshiaki) Yamashita (rear row second from right).

Note: in addition to these Kodokan 10th dans the International Judo Federation promoted Anton Geesink (NED) and Charles Palmer (UK) to 10th dan in 1997. Some countries have also made promotions to 10th dan, such as Henri Courtine in France in 2007, and Jaap Nauwelaerts de Agé in Holland in 2008.

According to Pokémon' s English dub voice director Tom Wayland, the episodes were sent to The Pokémon Company International, but never actually got to the re-dubbing process before their cancellation in Japan. Many screenshots from upcoming previews and magazines have managed to find their way online, as have various trailers that were broadcast prior to the episodes being pulled from the air.

These episodes are 2 of 4 Pokémon episodes that have never aired, the other 2 being "Battle of the Quaking Island! Barboach VS Whiscash!!" and "It's New Year's Eve! Pocket Monsters Encore" . 

The dan ( 段 ) ranking system is used by many Japanese organizations and Korean martial arts to indicate the level of one's ability within a certain subject matter. As a ranking system, it was originally used at a go school during the Edo period . [1] It is now also used in modern fine arts and martial arts .

The system was applied to martial arts in Japan by Kanō Jigorō (1860–1938), [2] the founder of judo , in 1883, and later introduced to other East Asian countries. [3] In the modern Japanese martial arts , holders of dan ranks often wear a black belt ; those of higher rank may also wear red-and-white and red belts . Dan ranks are also given for strategic board games such as go, Japanese chess ( shōgi ), and renju , as well as for cultural arts such as flower arrangement ( ikebana ), Japanese calligraphy ( shodō ) and tea ceremony ( sadō ). 

The Chinese character for the word dan (段) literally means step or stage in Japanese, but is also used to refer to one's rank or grade , i.e., one's degree or level of expertise and knowledge. In Chinese pinyin , however, the same character is spelled duàn , and was originally used to mean phase . Dan is often used together with the word kyū ( 級 ) in certain ranking systems, with dan being used for the higher ranks and kyū being used for lower ranks.

Zard - Wikipedia


Dan Larsen, Amazing 46 Vert Part 2 - YouTube

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