You might most frequently use OxfordDictionaries.com to double-check the spelling or pronunciation of a word, or to find a synonym for a common term. But sometimes you might want to learn a new and unfamiliar word – one which you probably won’t need in everyday conversation or writing, but which is fun, interesting, and unusual.

We’ve brought together a list of some weird and wonderful words, from aa (a kind of volcanic lava) all the way to the Zyrian language. Along the way you’ll encounter words for ‘resembling an ostrich’, ‘a bird’s wishbone’, and the technical term for the big toe…

You might most frequently use OxfordDictionaries.com to double-check the spelling or pronunciation of a word, or to find a synonym for a common term. But sometimes you might want to learn a new and unfamiliar word – one which you probably won’t need in everyday conversation or writing, but which is fun, interesting, and unusual.

We’ve brought together a list of some weird and wonderful words, from aa (a kind of volcanic lava) all the way to the Zyrian language. Along the way you’ll encounter words for ‘resembling an ostrich’, ‘a bird’s wishbone’, and the technical term for the big toe…

Dr. Samuel Johnson, creator of the Dictionary of Modern English , would often visit two sisters in 18th-century London – Mrs Digby and Mrs Brooke. On one of these visits, the two ladies were paying Johnson many compliments about his recently published dictionary, particularly commending him for not including any ‘ghastly’ rude words. Johnson responded, “What! my dears! then you have been looking for them?”. Embarrassed, the ladies immediately dropped the subject.

This story shows the wry wit and humour of the legendary Dr Samuel Johnson. Johnson was an interesting character – feeding his cat Hodge with fresh oysters, penning poems to dead ducklings, and convulsing and contorting his face with an unknown condition , which meant that he sometimes chose to lock himself up with chains and a padlock. In many ways, Johnson was a man of his times, but some aspects of his life are more surprising, including his friendship with his valet, the freed slave Francis Barber , who would become Johnson’s great friend and heir.

Johnson’s humorous and surprising spirit seeped into his dictionary. With the tongue-twisting full title of 'A dictionary of the English Language: in which the words are deduced from their originals, and illustrated in their different significations by examples from the best writers. To which are prefixed, a history of the language, and an English grammar' , Johnson’s dictionary took the lexicographer only 9 years, while it took a team of 40 people a total of 55 years to complete the French equivalent of the era.

Ankole longhorns and their massive horns have survived in Africa for thousands of years. Their horns are used in defense and cooling and can weigh up to 100 pounds each and reach 8 feet from tip to tip.

The ear-like fins of this octopus have earned it the name “Dumbo.” The octopus lives at extreme depths of 10,000 to 11,000 feet, searching for worms and other crustaceans at the seafloor.

Irrawaddy dolphins are found in coastal areas in South and Southeast Asia. These animals are known for their bulging forehead and short beak, giving them a far stranger appearance than other dolphins.

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You might most frequently use OxfordDictionaries.com to double-check the spelling or pronunciation of a word, or to find a synonym for a common term. But sometimes you might want to learn a new and unfamiliar word – one which you probably won’t need in everyday conversation or writing, but which is fun, interesting, and unusual.

We’ve brought together a list of some weird and wonderful words, from aa (a kind of volcanic lava) all the way to the Zyrian language. Along the way you’ll encounter words for ‘resembling an ostrich’, ‘a bird’s wishbone’, and the technical term for the big toe…

Dr. Samuel Johnson, creator of the Dictionary of Modern English , would often visit two sisters in 18th-century London – Mrs Digby and Mrs Brooke. On one of these visits, the two ladies were paying Johnson many compliments about his recently published dictionary, particularly commending him for not including any ‘ghastly’ rude words. Johnson responded, “What! my dears! then you have been looking for them?”. Embarrassed, the ladies immediately dropped the subject.

This story shows the wry wit and humour of the legendary Dr Samuel Johnson. Johnson was an interesting character – feeding his cat Hodge with fresh oysters, penning poems to dead ducklings, and convulsing and contorting his face with an unknown condition , which meant that he sometimes chose to lock himself up with chains and a padlock. In many ways, Johnson was a man of his times, but some aspects of his life are more surprising, including his friendship with his valet, the freed slave Francis Barber , who would become Johnson’s great friend and heir.

Johnson’s humorous and surprising spirit seeped into his dictionary. With the tongue-twisting full title of 'A dictionary of the English Language: in which the words are deduced from their originals, and illustrated in their different significations by examples from the best writers. To which are prefixed, a history of the language, and an English grammar' , Johnson’s dictionary took the lexicographer only 9 years, while it took a team of 40 people a total of 55 years to complete the French equivalent of the era.

Ankole longhorns and their massive horns have survived in Africa for thousands of years. Their horns are used in defense and cooling and can weigh up to 100 pounds each and reach 8 feet from tip to tip.

The ear-like fins of this octopus have earned it the name “Dumbo.” The octopus lives at extreme depths of 10,000 to 11,000 feet, searching for worms and other crustaceans at the seafloor.

Irrawaddy dolphins are found in coastal areas in South and Southeast Asia. These animals are known for their bulging forehead and short beak, giving them a far stranger appearance than other dolphins.

You might most frequently use OxfordDictionaries.com to double-check the spelling or pronunciation of a word, or to find a synonym for a common term. But sometimes you might want to learn a new and unfamiliar word – one which you probably won’t need in everyday conversation or writing, but which is fun, interesting, and unusual.

We’ve brought together a list of some weird and wonderful words, from aa (a kind of volcanic lava) all the way to the Zyrian language. Along the way you’ll encounter words for ‘resembling an ostrich’, ‘a bird’s wishbone’, and the technical term for the big toe…

Dr. Samuel Johnson, creator of the Dictionary of Modern English , would often visit two sisters in 18th-century London – Mrs Digby and Mrs Brooke. On one of these visits, the two ladies were paying Johnson many compliments about his recently published dictionary, particularly commending him for not including any ‘ghastly’ rude words. Johnson responded, “What! my dears! then you have been looking for them?”. Embarrassed, the ladies immediately dropped the subject.

This story shows the wry wit and humour of the legendary Dr Samuel Johnson. Johnson was an interesting character – feeding his cat Hodge with fresh oysters, penning poems to dead ducklings, and convulsing and contorting his face with an unknown condition , which meant that he sometimes chose to lock himself up with chains and a padlock. In many ways, Johnson was a man of his times, but some aspects of his life are more surprising, including his friendship with his valet, the freed slave Francis Barber , who would become Johnson’s great friend and heir.

Johnson’s humorous and surprising spirit seeped into his dictionary. With the tongue-twisting full title of 'A dictionary of the English Language: in which the words are deduced from their originals, and illustrated in their different significations by examples from the best writers. To which are prefixed, a history of the language, and an English grammar' , Johnson’s dictionary took the lexicographer only 9 years, while it took a team of 40 people a total of 55 years to complete the French equivalent of the era.

The weird and wonderful - YouTube


The Weird and Wonderful - YouTube

Posted by 2018 article

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