The hot trend of shipping container homes fulfills many design desires: living simply, lessening clutter, being environmentally conscious, building a home on a budget and the chance to do something totally modern and different that makes your neighbors’ jaws drop.

But there are other practical aspects to living in a shipping container home. Your house is fireproof and low maintenance. You can live in a container home almost anywhere, and lock it up when you’re away. Even better, smaller container homes can move with you. Shipping container homes can be modular: You can stack two or three or more as needed. 

Shipping containers are made of steel and built to withstand weather, heavy stacking and ocean travel. While their lifespan can easily be 30 years, most shipping companies use them considerably less before putting them out to pasture. A typical shipping container work lifespan is 10 years or less.

A shipping container is a container with strength suitable to withstand shipment, storage, and handling. Shipping containers range from large reusable steel boxes used for intermodal shipments to the ubiquitous corrugated boxes. In the context of international shipping trade, "container" or "shipping container" is virtually synonymous with " intermodal freight container ," a container designed to be moved from one mode of transport to another without unloading and reloading. [1]

Corrugated boxes are commonly used as shipping containers [4] (more than 90% of all shipping containers are of this type). [4] [5] They are made of corrugated fiberboard which is lightweight, recyclable, and strong enough to ship a variety of products.

Wooden boxes are often used for shipping heavy and dense products. They are sometimes specified for shipments of government or military shipments.

Take a dozen shipping containers, stack 'em, add floor-to-ceiling windows and you get this huge 4,000 square foot, loft-like structure.

The 12 Container House, as it is cleverly called, was designed by architect Adam Kalkin and built in 2004 on a piece of property in Blue Hill, Maine.

There are three bedrooms upstairs and a guest room on the ground floor. Other amenities include two steel staircases, two fireplaces, a breakfast bar and radiant in-floor heating.


Shipping container houses are the hallmarks of architectural recycling. These are Intermodal Steel Building Units, or ISBUs, that are reused as structures for any place and for any purpose. Be it a home, a studio, a port or a palace, shipping containers are inexpensive and durable buildings for residential, commercial and even industrial use.

ISBUs are made of 100 percent Corten Steel, and there are a range of different sizes for them. However, the popular choice for shipping container houses are former sea containers that come in two standard sizes:

Alone, these can be suited as a tiny house. Even so, some people put multiple containers together for a bigger house. Others have even built entire commercial marine ports out of shipping containers, as well as big company headquarters, student housing and homeless shelters.

The hot trend of shipping container homes fulfills many design desires: living simply, lessening clutter, being environmentally conscious, building a home on a budget and the chance to do something totally modern and different that makes your neighbors’ jaws drop.

But there are other practical aspects to living in a shipping container home. Your house is fireproof and low maintenance. You can live in a container home almost anywhere, and lock it up when you’re away. Even better, smaller container homes can move with you. Shipping container homes can be modular: You can stack two or three or more as needed. 

Shipping containers are made of steel and built to withstand weather, heavy stacking and ocean travel. While their lifespan can easily be 30 years, most shipping companies use them considerably less before putting them out to pasture. A typical shipping container work lifespan is 10 years or less.

A shipping container is a container with strength suitable to withstand shipment, storage, and handling. Shipping containers range from large reusable steel boxes used for intermodal shipments to the ubiquitous corrugated boxes. In the context of international shipping trade, "container" or "shipping container" is virtually synonymous with " intermodal freight container ," a container designed to be moved from one mode of transport to another without unloading and reloading. [1]

Corrugated boxes are commonly used as shipping containers [4] (more than 90% of all shipping containers are of this type). [4] [5] They are made of corrugated fiberboard which is lightweight, recyclable, and strong enough to ship a variety of products.

Wooden boxes are often used for shipping heavy and dense products. They are sometimes specified for shipments of government or military shipments.

Take a dozen shipping containers, stack 'em, add floor-to-ceiling windows and you get this huge 4,000 square foot, loft-like structure.

The 12 Container House, as it is cleverly called, was designed by architect Adam Kalkin and built in 2004 on a piece of property in Blue Hill, Maine.

There are three bedrooms upstairs and a guest room on the ground floor. Other amenities include two steel staircases, two fireplaces, a breakfast bar and radiant in-floor heating.

The hot trend of shipping container homes fulfills many design desires: living simply, lessening clutter, being environmentally conscious, building a home on a budget and the chance to do something totally modern and different that makes your neighbors’ jaws drop.

But there are other practical aspects to living in a shipping container home. Your house is fireproof and low maintenance. You can live in a container home almost anywhere, and lock it up when you’re away. Even better, smaller container homes can move with you. Shipping container homes can be modular: You can stack two or three or more as needed. 

Shipping containers are made of steel and built to withstand weather, heavy stacking and ocean travel. While their lifespan can easily be 30 years, most shipping companies use them considerably less before putting them out to pasture. A typical shipping container work lifespan is 10 years or less.

A shipping container is a container with strength suitable to withstand shipment, storage, and handling. Shipping containers range from large reusable steel boxes used for intermodal shipments to the ubiquitous corrugated boxes. In the context of international shipping trade, "container" or "shipping container" is virtually synonymous with " intermodal freight container ," a container designed to be moved from one mode of transport to another without unloading and reloading. [1]

Corrugated boxes are commonly used as shipping containers [4] (more than 90% of all shipping containers are of this type). [4] [5] They are made of corrugated fiberboard which is lightweight, recyclable, and strong enough to ship a variety of products.

Wooden boxes are often used for shipping heavy and dense products. They are sometimes specified for shipments of government or military shipments.

Take a dozen shipping containers, stack 'em, add floor-to-ceiling windows and you get this huge 4,000 square foot, loft-like structure.

The 12 Container House, as it is cleverly called, was designed by architect Adam Kalkin and built in 2004 on a piece of property in Blue Hill, Maine.

There are three bedrooms upstairs and a guest room on the ground floor. Other amenities include two steel staircases, two fireplaces, a breakfast bar and radiant in-floor heating.


Shipping container houses are the hallmarks of architectural recycling. These are Intermodal Steel Building Units, or ISBUs, that are reused as structures for any place and for any purpose. Be it a home, a studio, a port or a palace, shipping containers are inexpensive and durable buildings for residential, commercial and even industrial use.

ISBUs are made of 100 percent Corten Steel, and there are a range of different sizes for them. However, the popular choice for shipping container houses are former sea containers that come in two standard sizes:

Alone, these can be suited as a tiny house. Even so, some people put multiple containers together for a bigger house. Others have even built entire commercial marine ports out of shipping containers, as well as big company headquarters, student housing and homeless shelters.

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The hot trend of shipping container homes fulfills many design desires: living simply, lessening clutter, being environmentally conscious, building a home on a budget and the chance to do something totally modern and different that makes your neighbors’ jaws drop.

But there are other practical aspects to living in a shipping container home. Your house is fireproof and low maintenance. You can live in a container home almost anywhere, and lock it up when you’re away. Even better, smaller container homes can move with you. Shipping container homes can be modular: You can stack two or three or more as needed. 

Shipping containers are made of steel and built to withstand weather, heavy stacking and ocean travel. While their lifespan can easily be 30 years, most shipping companies use them considerably less before putting them out to pasture. A typical shipping container work lifespan is 10 years or less.

The hot trend of shipping container homes fulfills many design desires: living simply, lessening clutter, being environmentally conscious, building a home on a budget and the chance to do something totally modern and different that makes your neighbors’ jaws drop.

But there are other practical aspects to living in a shipping container home. Your house is fireproof and low maintenance. You can live in a container home almost anywhere, and lock it up when you’re away. Even better, smaller container homes can move with you. Shipping container homes can be modular: You can stack two or three or more as needed. 

Shipping containers are made of steel and built to withstand weather, heavy stacking and ocean travel. While their lifespan can easily be 30 years, most shipping companies use them considerably less before putting them out to pasture. A typical shipping container work lifespan is 10 years or less.

A shipping container is a container with strength suitable to withstand shipment, storage, and handling. Shipping containers range from large reusable steel boxes used for intermodal shipments to the ubiquitous corrugated boxes. In the context of international shipping trade, "container" or "shipping container" is virtually synonymous with " intermodal freight container ," a container designed to be moved from one mode of transport to another without unloading and reloading. [1]

Corrugated boxes are commonly used as shipping containers [4] (more than 90% of all shipping containers are of this type). [4] [5] They are made of corrugated fiberboard which is lightweight, recyclable, and strong enough to ship a variety of products.

Wooden boxes are often used for shipping heavy and dense products. They are sometimes specified for shipments of government or military shipments.

Shipping Container Homes: 15 Ideas for Life Inside the Box


Best 25+ Shipping container homes ideas on Pinterest.

Posted by 2018 article

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