Christian Mukunda Halliburton is the inaugural career faculty member at the Anchorage Satellite Campus. He teaches courses in Criminal Law, Constitutional Law, Criminal Procedure, and Law and Religion.

Professor Halliburton spent several years in private firm practice, and two years clerking for the Honorable Barbara Jacobs Rothstein of the United States District Court in Seattle, before joining the faculty at Seattle University in 2002. An anthropologist by training, Professor Halliburton tends to focus his teaching and scholarship on the human aspect of the institution of legal regulation - both in terms of determining optimal regulatory regimes, and as a way of internalizing the universe of societal costs associated with such regulatory systems.

He has written articles on topics ranging from jurisprudential theories of privacy and evidentiary exclusion under the Fourth Amendment to the intersection of race and criminal law in the post- Brown v. Board of Education context. In addition to his teaching and involvement in the Seattle University School of Law community, Professor Halliburton is actively involved in the protection and pursuit of individual civil liberties as a member of the Board of Directors for the American Civil Liberties Union of Washington, and regularly provides public and media presentations on matters involving civil rights and individual freedoms.

Seattleites usually describe Seattle locations in terms of "neighborhoods." This is partly because of a potentially confusing system of street addresses (see Get around ). The breakdown into neighborhoods is informal and mutates over time, and while there are often signs on major arterial roads to let you know that you are "entering" a particular neighborhood, the placement of these signs is arbitrary and occasionally controversial.

Still, knowing what neighborhood you're looking for can be a good sanity check when you're looking for an address. A Seattleite would describe 1401 45th Ave SW as being in West Seattle, and 1401 NE 45th St as being in the U-District (University District), which you'll note are diagonally opposite on the map. See Get around for an explanation.

The Seattle City clerk maintains an interactive map [38] that starts with the high-level districts, but lets you click on those to get the detailed neighborhoods too.

OK, so we’ll pick back up with our local Seattle (or to be more specific, Bellevue) Starbucks haunts at a later date. For today’s post, pictures of yesterday’s stop by the Starbucks stand at the North Satellite of SeaTac Airport, which is very nicely placed besides Gate 7, which where we always seem to be assigned when flying out of the North Satellite. Anyway, the coffee was a welcome breakfast

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Christian Mukunda Halliburton is the inaugural career faculty member at the Anchorage Satellite Campus. He teaches courses in Criminal Law, Constitutional Law, Criminal Procedure, and Law and Religion.

Professor Halliburton spent several years in private firm practice, and two years clerking for the Honorable Barbara Jacobs Rothstein of the United States District Court in Seattle, before joining the faculty at Seattle University in 2002. An anthropologist by training, Professor Halliburton tends to focus his teaching and scholarship on the human aspect of the institution of legal regulation - both in terms of determining optimal regulatory regimes, and as a way of internalizing the universe of societal costs associated with such regulatory systems.

He has written articles on topics ranging from jurisprudential theories of privacy and evidentiary exclusion under the Fourth Amendment to the intersection of race and criminal law in the post- Brown v. Board of Education context. In addition to his teaching and involvement in the Seattle University School of Law community, Professor Halliburton is actively involved in the protection and pursuit of individual civil liberties as a member of the Board of Directors for the American Civil Liberties Union of Washington, and regularly provides public and media presentations on matters involving civil rights and individual freedoms.

Christian Mukunda Halliburton is the inaugural career faculty member at the Anchorage Satellite Campus. He teaches courses in Criminal Law, Constitutional Law, Criminal Procedure, and Law and Religion.

Professor Halliburton spent several years in private firm practice, and two years clerking for the Honorable Barbara Jacobs Rothstein of the United States District Court in Seattle, before joining the faculty at Seattle University in 2002. An anthropologist by training, Professor Halliburton tends to focus his teaching and scholarship on the human aspect of the institution of legal regulation - both in terms of determining optimal regulatory regimes, and as a way of internalizing the universe of societal costs associated with such regulatory systems.

He has written articles on topics ranging from jurisprudential theories of privacy and evidentiary exclusion under the Fourth Amendment to the intersection of race and criminal law in the post- Brown v. Board of Education context. In addition to his teaching and involvement in the Seattle University School of Law community, Professor Halliburton is actively involved in the protection and pursuit of individual civil liberties as a member of the Board of Directors for the American Civil Liberties Union of Washington, and regularly provides public and media presentations on matters involving civil rights and individual freedoms.

Seattleites usually describe Seattle locations in terms of "neighborhoods." This is partly because of a potentially confusing system of street addresses (see Get around ). The breakdown into neighborhoods is informal and mutates over time, and while there are often signs on major arterial roads to let you know that you are "entering" a particular neighborhood, the placement of these signs is arbitrary and occasionally controversial.

Still, knowing what neighborhood you're looking for can be a good sanity check when you're looking for an address. A Seattleite would describe 1401 45th Ave SW as being in West Seattle, and 1401 NE 45th St as being in the U-District (University District), which you'll note are diagonally opposite on the map. See Get around for an explanation.

The Seattle City clerk maintains an interactive map [38] that starts with the high-level districts, but lets you click on those to get the detailed neighborhoods too.

Christian Mukunda Halliburton is the inaugural career faculty member at the Anchorage Satellite Campus. He teaches courses in Criminal Law, Constitutional Law, Criminal Procedure, and Law and Religion.

Professor Halliburton spent several years in private firm practice, and two years clerking for the Honorable Barbara Jacobs Rothstein of the United States District Court in Seattle, before joining the faculty at Seattle University in 2002. An anthropologist by training, Professor Halliburton tends to focus his teaching and scholarship on the human aspect of the institution of legal regulation - both in terms of determining optimal regulatory regimes, and as a way of internalizing the universe of societal costs associated with such regulatory systems.

He has written articles on topics ranging from jurisprudential theories of privacy and evidentiary exclusion under the Fourth Amendment to the intersection of race and criminal law in the post- Brown v. Board of Education context. In addition to his teaching and involvement in the Seattle University School of Law community, Professor Halliburton is actively involved in the protection and pursuit of individual civil liberties as a member of the Board of Directors for the American Civil Liberties Union of Washington, and regularly provides public and media presentations on matters involving civil rights and individual freedoms.

Seattleites usually describe Seattle locations in terms of "neighborhoods." This is partly because of a potentially confusing system of street addresses (see Get around ). The breakdown into neighborhoods is informal and mutates over time, and while there are often signs on major arterial roads to let you know that you are "entering" a particular neighborhood, the placement of these signs is arbitrary and occasionally controversial.

Still, knowing what neighborhood you're looking for can be a good sanity check when you're looking for an address. A Seattleite would describe 1401 45th Ave SW as being in West Seattle, and 1401 NE 45th St as being in the U-District (University District), which you'll note are diagonally opposite on the map. See Get around for an explanation.

The Seattle City clerk maintains an interactive map [38] that starts with the high-level districts, but lets you click on those to get the detailed neighborhoods too.

OK, so we’ll pick back up with our local Seattle (or to be more specific, Bellevue) Starbucks haunts at a later date. For today’s post, pictures of yesterday’s stop by the Starbucks stand at the North Satellite of SeaTac Airport, which is very nicely placed besides Gate 7, which where we always seem to be assigned when flying out of the North Satellite. Anyway, the coffee was a welcome breakfast

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