If you read off a couple of the initial stats about this car before seeing it in the metal, you’d naturally be led in one direction. Twin cam engine. Super lightweight. Bright yellow nose. Competition-tuned coils. You’d think classic performance Lotus, right? Then you’d continue to read down and things just wouldn’t add up. Bolt-on steel wings. Built in Birmingham. Does that say leaf-spring suspension? A pickup body?

This car features an unholy mash-up of classic concepts that seem poles apart, yet have been made to work seamlessly together. Adam Kent-Smith’s plan with this build was to create the Morris Minor you’d have wanted to buy if you walked onto a British Leyland forecourt back in the ’70s. A Lotus Twin Cam powered Minor Pickup. The fastest way to move sheep in the west.

Being beautifully finished and authentic on the outside just makes the fierce growl this 1972 Minor produces even more incongruous, and awesome. The gearbox, freshly installed, is ferocious – just like the engine. The glorious Lotus Twin Cam revs infinitely, daring you to push harder. This is a car that will blow the minds of regular sportscar drivers when it looms in their mirrors, just before they’re consumed by a major monster of a Minor.

To my mind the Elan +2S 130/5 is the greatest car in the classic Lotus range.   Not to discount the charming Elan Sprint DHC or the beautiful Elite S1, but, at prices north of £45,000 for the former and more than £70,000 for the latter the +2S punches well above its weight in looks and performance at a more modest outlay.

Offered in the very best colour scheme of Lotus Yellow with Oatmeal seats, our car has been the subject of a comprehensive nut and bolt restoration by a skilled privateer restorer earning the car top kudos from the folks at Paul Matty Sports Cars who supplied many of the parts used in the rebuild . Completed in 2015 after close to twenty years in slumber, this car now wants for nothing but the open road. Indeed, the car has covered just c600 miles since restoration so is still running in.

Built from a new spider chassis, the car was fully stripped with many parts either replaced, or reconditioned and returned to the car during the build. The engine was fully stripped, the cylinder walls honed and new rings put on. New seals, gaskets, water pump and timing chain were also added. The compression test before stripping confirmed that the pistons were in good order, so these were cleaned and refitted. The transmission specialist, Graham Boulton, who worked for Lotus on these cars in period was entrusted to rebuild the 5-spd gearbox and diff in April 2014 before it was married to the car later in the restoration.

Lotus was previously owned by DRB-HICOM through its subsidiary Proton , which acquired it following the bankruptcy of former owner Romano Artioli in 1996.

On 24 May 2017, Geely announced that it will take a 51% controlling stake in Lotus. [4] [5] The remaining 49% will be acquired by Etika Automotive. [6]

The company was formed as Lotus Engineering Ltd. by engineers Colin Chapman and Colin Dare, both graduates of University College, London , in 1952. The four letters in the middle of the logo stand for the initials of company founder, Anthony Colin Bruce Chapman. When the logo was created, Colin Chapman's original partners Michael and Nigel Allen were led to believe that the letters stood for Colin Chapman and the Allen Brothers. [ citation needed ] [ clarification needed ]

If you read off a couple of the initial stats about this car before seeing it in the metal, you’d naturally be led in one direction. Twin cam engine. Super lightweight. Bright yellow nose. Competition-tuned coils. You’d think classic performance Lotus, right? Then you’d continue to read down and things just wouldn’t add up. Bolt-on steel wings. Built in Birmingham. Does that say leaf-spring suspension? A pickup body?

This car features an unholy mash-up of classic concepts that seem poles apart, yet have been made to work seamlessly together. Adam Kent-Smith’s plan with this build was to create the Morris Minor you’d have wanted to buy if you walked onto a British Leyland forecourt back in the ’70s. A Lotus Twin Cam powered Minor Pickup. The fastest way to move sheep in the west.

Being beautifully finished and authentic on the outside just makes the fierce growl this 1972 Minor produces even more incongruous, and awesome. The gearbox, freshly installed, is ferocious – just like the engine. The glorious Lotus Twin Cam revs infinitely, daring you to push harder. This is a car that will blow the minds of regular sportscar drivers when it looms in their mirrors, just before they’re consumed by a major monster of a Minor.

To my mind the Elan +2S 130/5 is the greatest car in the classic Lotus range.   Not to discount the charming Elan Sprint DHC or the beautiful Elite S1, but, at prices north of £45,000 for the former and more than £70,000 for the latter the +2S punches well above its weight in looks and performance at a more modest outlay.

Offered in the very best colour scheme of Lotus Yellow with Oatmeal seats, our car has been the subject of a comprehensive nut and bolt restoration by a skilled privateer restorer earning the car top kudos from the folks at Paul Matty Sports Cars who supplied many of the parts used in the rebuild . Completed in 2015 after close to twenty years in slumber, this car now wants for nothing but the open road. Indeed, the car has covered just c600 miles since restoration so is still running in.

Built from a new spider chassis, the car was fully stripped with many parts either replaced, or reconditioned and returned to the car during the build. The engine was fully stripped, the cylinder walls honed and new rings put on. New seals, gaskets, water pump and timing chain were also added. The compression test before stripping confirmed that the pistons were in good order, so these were cleaned and refitted. The transmission specialist, Graham Boulton, who worked for Lotus on these cars in period was entrusted to rebuild the 5-spd gearbox and diff in April 2014 before it was married to the car later in the restoration.

If you read off a couple of the initial stats about this car before seeing it in the metal, you’d naturally be led in one direction. Twin cam engine. Super lightweight. Bright yellow nose. Competition-tuned coils. You’d think classic performance Lotus, right? Then you’d continue to read down and things just wouldn’t add up. Bolt-on steel wings. Built in Birmingham. Does that say leaf-spring suspension? A pickup body?

This car features an unholy mash-up of classic concepts that seem poles apart, yet have been made to work seamlessly together. Adam Kent-Smith’s plan with this build was to create the Morris Minor you’d have wanted to buy if you walked onto a British Leyland forecourt back in the ’70s. A Lotus Twin Cam powered Minor Pickup. The fastest way to move sheep in the west.

Being beautifully finished and authentic on the outside just makes the fierce growl this 1972 Minor produces even more incongruous, and awesome. The gearbox, freshly installed, is ferocious – just like the engine. The glorious Lotus Twin Cam revs infinitely, daring you to push harder. This is a car that will blow the minds of regular sportscar drivers when it looms in their mirrors, just before they’re consumed by a major monster of a Minor.

1971 Lotus Elan - S4/Sprint DHC | Classic Driver Market


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