FROM THE NORTH-COUNTRY streams of England came the most lasting landmarks in the development of the fly fishing. The idylls of Walton and the technical prowess of Ronalds and Stewart originated north of London, but it was the streams south of the city, the Test and the Itchen, that would be the settings of the most controversial developments the sport has ever seen — indeed, a controversy that would carry right to our own fishing today.

The birth of this controversy coincided innocently enough with the emergence (ahem!) of the dry fly under the divine leadership of one Frederick Halford and culminated and matured with the development of the artificial nymph under the sponsorship of G.E.M. Skues. Both men added to our literary history with writings on their opposing positions.

Frederick Maurice Halford was the first genuine dry-fly snob. In fact, he gave the character type its definitions. Between  Floating Flies and How to Dress Them , published in 1886, and  The Dry-Fly Mans Handbook , published in 1913, Halford developed from a progressive theorist with a better idea to a dogmatic pedant who believed anyone who fished differently than he shouldn’t be allowed near moving water, let alone fish for trout.

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Philip Bailey describes a dry fly he originated nearly 30 years ago that has proven successful on three continents, in 15 countries and on both stillwaters and streams. He says, ‘I have never been without it since 1986. At the time I had no idea that this fly, which I tied in dark and light shades, would prove so successful in all types of hatches.’

I developed this pattern in 1986 in an attempt to produce a dry fly that was a generalist pattern that incorporated the right sort of trigger points to fool trout. Originally I called it the ‘50:50 Fly’ as the tail was 50% the length of the hook shank and about half the length of a normal tail on a dry fly. The body was 50% of the hook shank with the hackle forming the remaining 50%. And to complete the fly 50% of the hackle was removed under the body.

Its inauguration was in the summer of 1986/87. Tony Brothers (my old fishing buddy who has sadly passed away) and I went across to fish in Tasmania but instead of heading ‘up top’ to the Western Lakes we decided to fish the lowland streams around Launceston. For the first part of the week we stayed at the Kings Meadow Hotel and fished the lower Macquarie River and Brumby’s Creek system.

FROM THE NORTH-COUNTRY streams of England came the most lasting landmarks in the development of the fly fishing. The idylls of Walton and the technical prowess of Ronalds and Stewart originated north of London, but it was the streams south of the city, the Test and the Itchen, that would be the settings of the most controversial developments the sport has ever seen — indeed, a controversy that would carry right to our own fishing today.

The birth of this controversy coincided innocently enough with the emergence (ahem!) of the dry fly under the divine leadership of one Frederick Halford and culminated and matured with the development of the artificial nymph under the sponsorship of G.E.M. Skues. Both men added to our literary history with writings on their opposing positions.

Frederick Maurice Halford was the first genuine dry-fly snob. In fact, he gave the character type its definitions. Between  Floating Flies and How to Dress Them , published in 1886, and  The Dry-Fly Mans Handbook , published in 1913, Halford developed from a progressive theorist with a better idea to a dogmatic pedant who believed anyone who fished differently than he shouldn’t be allowed near moving water, let alone fish for trout.

FROM THE NORTH-COUNTRY streams of England came the most lasting landmarks in the development of the fly fishing. The idylls of Walton and the technical prowess of Ronalds and Stewart originated north of London, but it was the streams south of the city, the Test and the Itchen, that would be the settings of the most controversial developments the sport has ever seen — indeed, a controversy that would carry right to our own fishing today.

The birth of this controversy coincided innocently enough with the emergence (ahem!) of the dry fly under the divine leadership of one Frederick Halford and culminated and matured with the development of the artificial nymph under the sponsorship of G.E.M. Skues. Both men added to our literary history with writings on their opposing positions.

Frederick Maurice Halford was the first genuine dry-fly snob. In fact, he gave the character type its definitions. Between  Floating Flies and How to Dress Them , published in 1886, and  The Dry-Fly Mans Handbook , published in 1913, Halford developed from a progressive theorist with a better idea to a dogmatic pedant who believed anyone who fished differently than he shouldn’t be allowed near moving water, let alone fish for trout.

AbeBooks offers millions of new, used, rare and out-of-print books, as well as cheap textbooks from thousands of booksellers around the world. Shopping on AbeBooks is easy, safe and 100% secure - search for your book, purchase a copy via our secure checkout and the bookseller ships it straight to you.

Rear Admiral Joseph’s Original London Dry Gin Review


Streamers: Think Outside the Swing | MidCurrent

Posted by 2018 article