Under the new body, the running gear was very similar to the 1966 Cortina . The rear suspension employed a live axle supported on leaf springs with short radius rods. [6] MacPherson struts were featured at the front in combination with rack and pinion steering (sourced from the Ford Escort) which employed a steering column that would collapse in response to a collision. [6]

The initial reception of the car was broadly favourable. In the June 1970 edition of the Monthly Driver's Gazette , tester Archie Vicar wrote of the gearchange that it was "...in Ford fashion easy to operate but not very jolly". In the same review Vicar summed up the car as follows: "Perhaps with a bit of work it can be given road-holding and performance less like an American car and more like a European one". [7]

The range continued to be broadened, with another 3.0 variant, the Capri 3000E introduced from the British plant in March 1970, offering "more luxurious interior trim". [6]

Under the new body, the running gear was very similar to the 1966 Cortina . The rear suspension employed a live axle supported on leaf springs with short radius rods. [6] MacPherson struts were featured at the front in combination with rack and pinion steering (sourced from the Ford Escort) which employed a steering column that would collapse in response to a collision. [6]

The initial reception of the car was broadly favourable. In the June 1970 edition of the Monthly Driver's Gazette , tester Archie Vicar wrote of the gearchange that it was "...in Ford fashion easy to operate but not very jolly". In the same review Vicar summed up the car as follows: "Perhaps with a bit of work it can be given road-holding and performance less like an American car and more like a European one". [7]

The range continued to be broadened, with another 3.0 variant, the Capri 3000E introduced from the British plant in March 1970, offering "more luxurious interior trim". [6]

The Ford Tempo is one of the most successful models Ford has ever made during the time that the automotive industry is overhauling itself to respond to the market's growing demand for fuel-efficient cars. After its run that started in 1984 until 1995, Ford had sold close to 3 million Tempos in the U.S. The youngest Ford Tempo is almost two decades old. With aging comes lots of problems-this is actually what Ford Tempo owners experience firsthand. Below are some of the most common problems that owners experience:

Some Ford Tempo models simply don't start regardless if it is a 2.0 L or a 2.3 L, if it is new or old, or if it is model year 1984 or 1995. No, the solution isn't as simple as replacing the spark plugs or tuning the engine. Websites suggest that a manufacturer's or design flaw is causing the Tempo to not start or intermittently start. The fuel pump and other parts that are involved in making the vehicle start have to be replaced.

Somewhat related to the ignition problem, the Ford Tempo has a reputation for stalling, even at highway speed. The car simply dies. Thankfully, it can restart. Still, it can be dangerous to drive around in a vehicle that appears to have a habit of dying in the middle of the road.

Ford Tempo - Ford Wiki


Ford Tempo Forum | Mercury Topaz Forum - Ford Forums.

Posted by 2018 article

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