Pierce, Governor of Oregon, et al. v. Society of the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary , 268 U.S. 510 (1925), was an early 20th-century United States Supreme Court decision striking down an Oregon statute that required all children to attend public school. The decision significantly expanded coverage of the Due Process Clause in the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution to recognize personal civil liberties. The case has been cited as a precedent in more than 100 Supreme Court cases, including Roe v. Wade , and in more than 70 cases in the courts of appeals .

After World War I, some states concerned about the influence of immigrants and "foreign" values looked to public schools for help. The states drafted laws designed to use schools to promote a common American culture.

On November 7, 1922, the voters of Oregon passed an initiative amending Oregon Law Section 5259, the Compulsory Education Act . The citizens' initiative was primarily aimed at eliminating parochial schools , including Catholic schools. [1]

Slaughter was born Dorothy Louise McIntosh on August 14, 1929, in Lynch, Kentucky , a coal mining town built by a subsidiary of U.S. Steel . She is the daughter of Daisy Grace (Byers) and Oscar Lewis McIntosh, a blacksmith for a coal mine. [2]

She had two brothers, Philip and David as well as two sisters, Marjorie and Virginia. Her sister Virginia died [ when? ] of pneumonia while she was a child; Slaughter later cited this as her reason for earning degrees in microbiology and public health . [ citation needed ]

The family moved to Monticello, Kentucky , where Slaughter attended high school. After graduating from high school, she enrolled at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky , where she studied microbiology .

The 2 Sisters Food Group said staff at its site in the West Midlands will need to be "appropriately retrained" before it starts resupplying customers.

In a statement , the company said an internal investigation had shown "some isolated instances of non-compliance" at its plant in West Bromwich.

"We have therefore decided to temporarily suspend operations at the site to allow us the time to retrain all colleagues, including management, in all food safety and quality management systems."

Having already suspended operations at its plant in West Bromwich, U.K. , over food safety concerns, the company is now being called out for alleged breaches at its Coupar Angus facility in Scotland.

According to a report from ITV , an inspection of the Coupar Angus plant for supermarket chain Tesco revealed that Tesco’s audit team gave a “red” warning to the 2 Sisters plant after uncovering “major” issues of non-compliance.

“We view these allegations extremely seriously,” the company stated. “However, ITV and The Guardian are referring to standard inspection audits and appear to be trying to damage the reputation of our factories and potentially the livelihoods of 23,000 colleagues by misrepresenting them. There is and never was any risk to food safety at Coupar Angus. This is using old news to highlight issues which were resolved with our customer two months ago. 

Pierce, Governor of Oregon, et al. v. Society of the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary , 268 U.S. 510 (1925), was an early 20th-century United States Supreme Court decision striking down an Oregon statute that required all children to attend public school. The decision significantly expanded coverage of the Due Process Clause in the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution to recognize personal civil liberties. The case has been cited as a precedent in more than 100 Supreme Court cases, including Roe v. Wade , and in more than 70 cases in the courts of appeals .

After World War I, some states concerned about the influence of immigrants and "foreign" values looked to public schools for help. The states drafted laws designed to use schools to promote a common American culture.

On November 7, 1922, the voters of Oregon passed an initiative amending Oregon Law Section 5259, the Compulsory Education Act . The citizens' initiative was primarily aimed at eliminating parochial schools , including Catholic schools. [1]

Slaughter was born Dorothy Louise McIntosh on August 14, 1929, in Lynch, Kentucky , a coal mining town built by a subsidiary of U.S. Steel . She is the daughter of Daisy Grace (Byers) and Oscar Lewis McIntosh, a blacksmith for a coal mine. [2]

She had two brothers, Philip and David as well as two sisters, Marjorie and Virginia. Her sister Virginia died [ when? ] of pneumonia while she was a child; Slaughter later cited this as her reason for earning degrees in microbiology and public health . [ citation needed ]

The family moved to Monticello, Kentucky , where Slaughter attended high school. After graduating from high school, she enrolled at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky , where she studied microbiology .

The 2 Sisters Food Group said staff at its site in the West Midlands will need to be "appropriately retrained" before it starts resupplying customers.

In a statement , the company said an internal investigation had shown "some isolated instances of non-compliance" at its plant in West Bromwich.

"We have therefore decided to temporarily suspend operations at the site to allow us the time to retrain all colleagues, including management, in all food safety and quality management systems."

Pierce, Governor of Oregon, et al. v. Society of the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary , 268 U.S. 510 (1925), was an early 20th-century United States Supreme Court decision striking down an Oregon statute that required all children to attend public school. The decision significantly expanded coverage of the Due Process Clause in the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution to recognize personal civil liberties. The case has been cited as a precedent in more than 100 Supreme Court cases, including Roe v. Wade , and in more than 70 cases in the courts of appeals .

After World War I, some states concerned about the influence of immigrants and "foreign" values looked to public schools for help. The states drafted laws designed to use schools to promote a common American culture.

On November 7, 1922, the voters of Oregon passed an initiative amending Oregon Law Section 5259, the Compulsory Education Act . The citizens' initiative was primarily aimed at eliminating parochial schools , including Catholic schools. [1]

Slaughter was born Dorothy Louise McIntosh on August 14, 1929, in Lynch, Kentucky , a coal mining town built by a subsidiary of U.S. Steel . She is the daughter of Daisy Grace (Byers) and Oscar Lewis McIntosh, a blacksmith for a coal mine. [2]

She had two brothers, Philip and David as well as two sisters, Marjorie and Virginia. Her sister Virginia died [ when? ] of pneumonia while she was a child; Slaughter later cited this as her reason for earning degrees in microbiology and public health . [ citation needed ]

The family moved to Monticello, Kentucky , where Slaughter attended high school. After graduating from high school, she enrolled at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky , where she studied microbiology .

Pierce, Governor of Oregon, et al. v. Society of the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary , 268 U.S. 510 (1925), was an early 20th-century United States Supreme Court decision striking down an Oregon statute that required all children to attend public school. The decision significantly expanded coverage of the Due Process Clause in the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution to recognize personal civil liberties. The case has been cited as a precedent in more than 100 Supreme Court cases, including Roe v. Wade , and in more than 70 cases in the courts of appeals .

After World War I, some states concerned about the influence of immigrants and "foreign" values looked to public schools for help. The states drafted laws designed to use schools to promote a common American culture.

On November 7, 1922, the voters of Oregon passed an initiative amending Oregon Law Section 5259, the Compulsory Education Act . The citizens' initiative was primarily aimed at eliminating parochial schools , including Catholic schools. [1]

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Sisters In Slaughter eBook by E.S. Wynn - 1230000270952.

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