An autonomous spaceport drone ship (ASDS) is an ocean-going vessel derived from a deck barge , outfitted with station-keeping engines and a large landing platform . Construction of such ships was commissioned by aerospace company SpaceX to allow for recovery of rocket first-stages at sea for high-velocity missions which do not carry enough fuel to return to the launch site after lofting spacecraft onto an orbital trajectory . [1] [2]

SpaceX has two operational drone ships: Just Read the Instructions in the Pacific for launches from Vandenberg , and Of Course I Still Love You in the Atlantic for launches from Cape Canaveral . As of 30 October 2017 [update] , seventeen Falcon 9 flights have attempted to land on a drone ship , with twelve of them succeeding, the first vertical landing being the CRS-8 mission in April 2016.

The ASDS ships are a key component of the SpaceX reusable launch system development program which aims to significantly lower the price of space launch services through "full and rapid reusability." [3] Any flights going to geostationary orbit or exceeding escape velocity will require landing at sea, encompassing about half of SpaceX missions. [4]

Earth, 2144. Jack is an anti-patent scientist turned drug pirate, traversing the world in a submarine as a pharmaceutical Robin Hood, fabricating cheap scrips for poor people who can't otherwise afford them. But her latest drug hack has left a trail of lethal overdoses as people become addicted to their work, doing repetitive tasks until they become unsafe or insane.

Hot on her trail, an unlikely pair: Eliasz, a brooding military agent, and his robotic partner, Paladin. As they race to stop information about the sinister origins of Jack's drug from getting out, they begin to form an uncommonly close bond that neither of them fully understand.

And underlying it all is one fundamental question: Is freedom possible in a culture where everything, even people, can be owned?

An autonomous spaceport drone ship (ASDS) is an ocean-going vessel derived from a deck barge , outfitted with station-keeping engines and a large landing platform . Construction of such ships was commissioned by aerospace company SpaceX to allow for recovery of rocket first-stages at sea for high-velocity missions which do not carry enough fuel to return to the launch site after lofting spacecraft onto an orbital trajectory . [1] [2]

SpaceX has two operational drone ships: Just Read the Instructions in the Pacific for launches from Vandenberg , and Of Course I Still Love You in the Atlantic for launches from Cape Canaveral . As of 30 October 2017 [update] , seventeen Falcon 9 flights have attempted to land on a drone ship , with twelve of them succeeding, the first vertical landing being the CRS-8 mission in April 2016.

The ASDS ships are a key component of the SpaceX reusable launch system development program which aims to significantly lower the price of space launch services through "full and rapid reusability." [3] Any flights going to geostationary orbit or exceeding escape velocity will require landing at sea, encompassing about half of SpaceX missions. [4]

An autonomous spaceport drone ship (ASDS) is an ocean-going vessel derived from a deck barge , outfitted with station-keeping engines and a large landing platform . Construction of such ships was commissioned by aerospace company SpaceX to allow for recovery of rocket first-stages at sea for high-velocity missions which do not carry enough fuel to return to the launch site after lofting spacecraft onto an orbital trajectory . [1] [2]

SpaceX has two operational drone ships: Just Read the Instructions in the Pacific for launches from Vandenberg , and Of Course I Still Love You in the Atlantic for launches from Cape Canaveral . As of 30 October 2017 [update] , seventeen Falcon 9 flights have attempted to land on a drone ship , with twelve of them succeeding, the first vertical landing being the CRS-8 mission in April 2016.

The ASDS ships are a key component of the SpaceX reusable launch system development program which aims to significantly lower the price of space launch services through "full and rapid reusability." [3] Any flights going to geostationary orbit or exceeding escape velocity will require landing at sea, encompassing about half of SpaceX missions. [4]

Earth, 2144. Jack is an anti-patent scientist turned drug pirate, traversing the world in a submarine as a pharmaceutical Robin Hood, fabricating cheap scrips for poor people who can't otherwise afford them. But her latest drug hack has left a trail of lethal overdoses as people become addicted to their work, doing repetitive tasks until they become unsafe or insane.

Hot on her trail, an unlikely pair: Eliasz, a brooding military agent, and his robotic partner, Paladin. As they race to stop information about the sinister origins of Jack's drug from getting out, they begin to form an uncommonly close bond that neither of them fully understand.

And underlying it all is one fundamental question: Is freedom possible in a culture where everything, even people, can be owned?

I’m a firm believer in the idea that science fiction is about the present, not the future. And yet when I started to write my first novel, Autonomous , I spent a lot of time agonizing over how to construct a plausible 22 nd century for my characters to inhabit. I was never under any illusion that I was engaging in prophesy, but I wanted readers to feel like this was a future that could realistically emerge from current technologies and social problems.

The book is set about 125 years in the future, and there hasn’t been some giant apocalypse that resets history. I didn’t want my future to make a mockery of how history really works.

So the first thing I did—just to get some perspective—was think about how many ideas and trends from 125 years ago are still relevant today. I was surprised how much hadn’t changed: We’re still arguing over evolution; we still ride in trains and take photographs; we still have radical youth rebellions focused on free love, weird technology, and vegetarianism. A lot of little things are the same, too, like the fact that people in the mid-19 th century were reading the Atlantic magazine and camping out in Yosemite. Basically I wanted people in my 2144 to be just as alien (or not) as my great-great-grandparents’ generation is to me.

Autonomous | Annalee Newitz | Macmillan


Amazon.com: Autonomous: A Novel eBook: Annalee Newitz.

Posted by 2018 article

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