One of the hallmarks of children’s literature before, say, the 1950s, was its refusal to “dumb down” the language or condescend to children. Rather, the books were designed to grow with the child, and to entertain the parent who was presumably reading to her: For example, take a fresh look at the original Winnie the Pooh stories, E. Nesbit’s novels, the original Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books, or novels like Gene Stratton Porter’s Laddie . Even Beatrix Potter’s tales contain words like “perambulator” and “mackintosh” and “galoshes”.

Rudyard Kipling quite obviously reveled in the sounds of words and their conjuring power. He peppered his humorous Just So Stories with words like “ insatiable ” and “ excruciating “.  The by-colored python rock snake refers to the crocodile as, “This creature in the patent-leather ulster” and as “a man-o-war with an armor-plated upper deck”.   Here are some more terrific vocabulary words to expand your child’s brain–and yours:

See if you can match up the main animal character with its country or the geographic element mentioned, AND the secondary character that appeared in its story:

One of the hallmarks of children’s literature before, say, the 1950s, was its refusal to “dumb down” the language or condescend to children. Rather, the books were designed to grow with the child, and to entertain the parent who was presumably reading to her: For example, take a fresh look at the original Winnie the Pooh stories, E. Nesbit’s novels, the original Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books, or novels like Gene Stratton Porter’s Laddie . Even Beatrix Potter’s tales contain words like “perambulator” and “mackintosh” and “galoshes”.

Rudyard Kipling quite obviously reveled in the sounds of words and their conjuring power. He peppered his humorous Just So Stories with words like “ insatiable ” and “ excruciating “.  The by-colored python rock snake refers to the crocodile as, “This creature in the patent-leather ulster” and as “a man-o-war with an armor-plated upper deck”.   Here are some more terrific vocabulary words to expand your child’s brain–and yours:

See if you can match up the main animal character with its country or the geographic element mentioned, AND the secondary character that appeared in its story:

Kipling's tales are amongst the most inventive of all children's literature. With exquisite illustrations by Niroot Puttapipat, this is the definitive collector's edition.

The work of a master storyteller, Kipling's tales are amongst the most inventive of all children's literature. With exquisite paintings and pen-and-ink illustrations by Niroot Puttapipat, this is the definitive collector's edition.

Rudyard Kipling’s  Just So Stories  are among the most inventive and original of all children’s fiction. Posing ingenious explanations of how animals acquired their characteristics and revelling in exuberant wordplay, they are the work of a master storyteller. Kipling began inventing stories about how leopards got their spots and camels their humps to entertain his children – in particular his eldest daughter, Josephine, who died in 1899 aged six. When he wrote down the stories for publication in 1902, he remembered her with the phrase ‘Best Beloved’.

One of the hallmarks of children’s literature before, say, the 1950s, was its refusal to “dumb down” the language or condescend to children. Rather, the books were designed to grow with the child, and to entertain the parent who was presumably reading to her: For example, take a fresh look at the original Winnie the Pooh stories, E. Nesbit’s novels, the original Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books, or novels like Gene Stratton Porter’s Laddie . Even Beatrix Potter’s tales contain words like “perambulator” and “mackintosh” and “galoshes”.

Rudyard Kipling quite obviously reveled in the sounds of words and their conjuring power. He peppered his humorous Just So Stories with words like “ insatiable ” and “ excruciating “.  The by-colored python rock snake refers to the crocodile as, “This creature in the patent-leather ulster” and as “a man-o-war with an armor-plated upper deck”.   Here are some more terrific vocabulary words to expand your child’s brain–and yours:

See if you can match up the main animal character with its country or the geographic element mentioned, AND the secondary character that appeared in its story:

Kipling's tales are amongst the most inventive of all children's literature. With exquisite illustrations by Niroot Puttapipat, this is the definitive collector's edition.

The work of a master storyteller, Kipling's tales are amongst the most inventive of all children's literature. With exquisite paintings and pen-and-ink illustrations by Niroot Puttapipat, this is the definitive collector's edition.

Rudyard Kipling’s  Just So Stories  are among the most inventive and original of all children’s fiction. Posing ingenious explanations of how animals acquired their characteristics and revelling in exuberant wordplay, they are the work of a master storyteller. Kipling began inventing stories about how leopards got their spots and camels their humps to entertain his children – in particular his eldest daughter, Josephine, who died in 1899 aged six. When he wrote down the stories for publication in 1902, he remembered her with the phrase ‘Best Beloved’.

Just So Stories are considered some of Kipling's best works. They give fantastical explanations for various phenomena.

This collection of children's literature is a part of the Educational Technology Clearinghouse and is funded by various grants .

Copyright © 2006—2018 by the Florida Center for Instructional Technology , College of Education , University of South Florida .

Just So Stories, Rudyard Kipling - BOOP.ORG


Just-so story - Wikipedia

Posted by 2018 article

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