In the ancient Greek myths , ambrosia ( / æ m ˈ b r oʊ ʒ ə / , Greek : ἀμβροσία, "immortality" ) is sometimes the food or drink of the Greek gods, often depicted as conferring longevity or immortality upon whoever consumed it. [1] It was brought to the gods in Olympus by doves . [2]

Ambrosia is sometimes depicted in ancient art as distributed by a nymph labeled with that name. [3] In the myth of Lycurgus , an opponent to the wine god Dionysus , violence committed against Ambrosia turns her into a grapevine.

The consumption of ambrosia was typically reserved for divine beings. Upon his assumption into immortality on Olympus, Heracles is given ambrosia by Athena , while the hero Tydeus is denied the same thing when the goddess discovers him eating human brains. In one version of the myth of Tantalus , part of Tantalus' crime is that after tasting ambrosia himself, he attempts to steal some away to give to other mortals. [10] Those who consume ambrosia typically had not blood in their veins, but ichor . [11]

The Food of the Gods starred Marjoe Gortner, Pamela Franklin, Ralph Meker, Jon Cypher, John McLiam and Ida Lupino This film was Ioosely based on a portion of the H.G. Wells novel The Food of the Gods and How It Came to Earth.

The film reduced Wells' tale to an "Ecology Strikes Back" scenario, in science fiction movies at the time. The food"mysteriously bubbles up from the ground on a remote Island somewhere in British Columbia. Mr. and Mrs. Skinner (John McLima and Ida Lupino) consider it a gift from God, and feed it to their chickens, which grow larger than humans as a result. Rats, wasps, and grub worms also conume the substance, and the island becomes infested with giant vermin. One night, a swarm of giant rats kill Mr. Skinner after his car tyre punctured in the forest.

When we look into the accounts of many different mythologies and religions, it becomes clear that the gods are either immortal or live a life of many thousands of years.  What is rarely mentioned is the fact that in ancient religious texts there is reference to their immortality or longevity being connected to a specific kind of food that only the gods are allowed to eat. The gods were required to eat this food regularly to maintain immortality, power and strength.  Many references also refer to the fact that if mortals ate this food, they would also become immortal like the gods.  So let us explore the mythology surrounding this ‘Elixir of Life’

One of the main references to the food of the immortals can be found in Greek mythology.  It is written in the stories of the Greek gods that ambrosia and nectar was the food and drink of the immortal gods and this first appears in the Greek mythology relating to the birth of Zeus. Before the ‘invention’ or ‘discovery’ of ambrosia and nectar by the gods, it was written that they would feed by ‘sniffing’ the vapours of their dead enemies, as if they would feed from the energy of the dead souls.

Ambrosia was said to come from the horn of a magical goat named Amalthea, the foster-mother of Zeus. The horns of Amalthea provided a limitless supply of ambrosia but were also capable of producing any kind of food for any kind of living being.  White holy doves would carry the ambrosia and a large eagle with shiny wings would fly at an extraordinary speed through the sky where he would get the nectar and then bring it down to the baby Zeus.

In the ancient Greek myths , ambrosia ( / æ m ˈ b r oʊ ʒ ə / , Greek : ἀμβροσία, "immortality" ) is sometimes the food or drink of the Greek gods, often depicted as conferring longevity or immortality upon whoever consumed it. [1] It was brought to the gods in Olympus by doves . [2]

Ambrosia is sometimes depicted in ancient art as distributed by a nymph labeled with that name. [3] In the myth of Lycurgus , an opponent to the wine god Dionysus , violence committed against Ambrosia turns her into a grapevine.

The consumption of ambrosia was typically reserved for divine beings. Upon his assumption into immortality on Olympus, Heracles is given ambrosia by Athena , while the hero Tydeus is denied the same thing when the goddess discovers him eating human brains. In one version of the myth of Tantalus , part of Tantalus' crime is that after tasting ambrosia himself, he attempts to steal some away to give to other mortals. [10] Those who consume ambrosia typically had not blood in their veins, but ichor . [11]

The Food of the Gods starred Marjoe Gortner, Pamela Franklin, Ralph Meker, Jon Cypher, John McLiam and Ida Lupino This film was Ioosely based on a portion of the H.G. Wells novel The Food of the Gods and How It Came to Earth.

The film reduced Wells' tale to an "Ecology Strikes Back" scenario, in science fiction movies at the time. The food"mysteriously bubbles up from the ground on a remote Island somewhere in British Columbia. Mr. and Mrs. Skinner (John McLima and Ida Lupino) consider it a gift from God, and feed it to their chickens, which grow larger than humans as a result. Rats, wasps, and grub worms also conume the substance, and the island becomes infested with giant vermin. One night, a swarm of giant rats kill Mr. Skinner after his car tyre punctured in the forest.

In the ancient Greek myths , ambrosia ( / æ m ˈ b r oʊ ʒ ə / , Greek : ἀμβροσία, "immortality" ) is sometimes the food or drink of the Greek gods, often depicted as conferring longevity or immortality upon whoever consumed it. [1] It was brought to the gods in Olympus by doves . [2]

Ambrosia is sometimes depicted in ancient art as distributed by a nymph labeled with that name. [3] In the myth of Lycurgus , an opponent to the wine god Dionysus , violence committed against Ambrosia turns her into a grapevine.

The consumption of ambrosia was typically reserved for divine beings. Upon his assumption into immortality on Olympus, Heracles is given ambrosia by Athena , while the hero Tydeus is denied the same thing when the goddess discovers him eating human brains. In one version of the myth of Tantalus , part of Tantalus' crime is that after tasting ambrosia himself, he attempts to steal some away to give to other mortals. [10] Those who consume ambrosia typically had not blood in their veins, but ichor . [11]

Ambrosia - Wikipedia


The Food of the Gods (1976) - IMDb

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