If you are sure that none of the above applies to you, and wish us to investigate the problem, we need to know your IP address. Go to this site , don't sign up, just copy the IP address (it looks like: 12.34.56.78 but your numbers will be different) and mail it to us . If that page also shows a proxy address, we need that one too.

"...But our home has never been anything but a playroom, I've been your doll-wife, just as I used to be Papa's doll-child. And the children have been my dolls. I used to think it was fun when you came in and played with me, just as they think it's fun when I go in and play games with them. That's all our marriage has been…. "

Another ironic indication in the use of the word "doll's" is that the house does not belong to the doll. Nor is it made or maintained for her. The house, not home, is Mr. Torvald Helmer's. In one sense, he possesses the house, along with the doll! The house, therefore, seems to belong to the doll; but actually it is her cage. We say that the cover of a book belongs to it, or that it is the book's cover. It is only in that sense that the house belongs to the doll. Thus, Nora is the doll, and the house is a cage or 'case' for her. Indeed, the theme of the play suggests that her house (or home, or family) is a limitation on her freedom and prospects of life.

If you are sure that none of the above applies to you, and wish us to investigate the problem, we need to know your IP address. Go to this site , don't sign up, just copy the IP address (it looks like: 12.34.56.78 but your numbers will be different) and mail it to us . If that page also shows a proxy address, we need that one too.

"...But our home has never been anything but a playroom, I've been your doll-wife, just as I used to be Papa's doll-child. And the children have been my dolls. I used to think it was fun when you came in and played with me, just as they think it's fun when I go in and play games with them. That's all our marriage has been…. "

Another ironic indication in the use of the word "doll's" is that the house does not belong to the doll. Nor is it made or maintained for her. The house, not home, is Mr. Torvald Helmer's. In one sense, he possesses the house, along with the doll! The house, therefore, seems to belong to the doll; but actually it is her cage. We say that the cover of a book belongs to it, or that it is the book's cover. It is only in that sense that the house belongs to the doll. Thus, Nora is the doll, and the house is a cage or 'case' for her. Indeed, the theme of the play suggests that her house (or home, or family) is a limitation on her freedom and prospects of life.

Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions | About | Sitemap | Advertise
Fiction Books | Textbooks | eTextbooks | Classic Books | Used Books | Teen Books | nook | eReader
©2011 SparkNotes LLC, All Rights Reserved

If you are sure that none of the above applies to you, and wish us to investigate the problem, we need to know your IP address. Go to this site , don't sign up, just copy the IP address (it looks like: 12.34.56.78 but your numbers will be different) and mail it to us . If that page also shows a proxy address, we need that one too.

"...But our home has never been anything but a playroom, I've been your doll-wife, just as I used to be Papa's doll-child. And the children have been my dolls. I used to think it was fun when you came in and played with me, just as they think it's fun when I go in and play games with them. That's all our marriage has been…. "

Another ironic indication in the use of the word "doll's" is that the house does not belong to the doll. Nor is it made or maintained for her. The house, not home, is Mr. Torvald Helmer's. In one sense, he possesses the house, along with the doll! The house, therefore, seems to belong to the doll; but actually it is her cage. We say that the cover of a book belongs to it, or that it is the book's cover. It is only in that sense that the house belongs to the doll. Thus, Nora is the doll, and the house is a cage or 'case' for her. Indeed, the theme of the play suggests that her house (or home, or family) is a limitation on her freedom and prospects of life.

Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions | About | Sitemap | Advertise
Fiction Books | Textbooks | eTextbooks | Classic Books | Used Books | Teen Books | nook | eReader
©2011 SparkNotes LLC, All Rights Reserved

For Nora, her action was the right thing. She felt trapped; she felt like a play thing taken down from the shelf when her husband deemed her worth paying attention to; she had no fulfillment, no individuality. Torvald not only doesn't treat...

In the short story "The Doll's House", what does the narrator reveal about Aunt Beryl's attitude toward social classes?

Aunt Beryl sees herself as above all others because of her social status. She believes herself entitled to the luxury in which she lives and detaches herself from everything and everyone outside of her self-proclaimed realm. Poverty isn't welcome...

If you are sure that none of the above applies to you, and wish us to investigate the problem, we need to know your IP address. Go to this site , don't sign up, just copy the IP address (it looks like: 12.34.56.78 but your numbers will be different) and mail it to us . If that page also shows a proxy address, we need that one too.

If you are sure that none of the above applies to you, and wish us to investigate the problem, we need to know your IP address. Go to this site , don't sign up, just copy the IP address (it looks like: 12.34.56.78 but your numbers will be different) and mail it to us . If that page also shows a proxy address, we need that one too.

"...But our home has never been anything but a playroom, I've been your doll-wife, just as I used to be Papa's doll-child. And the children have been my dolls. I used to think it was fun when you came in and played with me, just as they think it's fun when I go in and play games with them. That's all our marriage has been…. "

Another ironic indication in the use of the word "doll's" is that the house does not belong to the doll. Nor is it made or maintained for her. The house, not home, is Mr. Torvald Helmer's. In one sense, he possesses the house, along with the doll! The house, therefore, seems to belong to the doll; but actually it is her cage. We say that the cover of a book belongs to it, or that it is the book's cover. It is only in that sense that the house belongs to the doll. Thus, Nora is the doll, and the house is a cage or 'case' for her. Indeed, the theme of the play suggests that her house (or home, or family) is a limitation on her freedom and prospects of life.

Contact Us | Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions | About | Sitemap | Advertise
Fiction Books | Textbooks | eTextbooks | Classic Books | Used Books | Teen Books | nook | eReader
©2011 SparkNotes LLC, All Rights Reserved

For Nora, her action was the right thing. She felt trapped; she felt like a play thing taken down from the shelf when her husband deemed her worth paying attention to; she had no fulfillment, no individuality. Torvald not only doesn't treat...

In the short story "The Doll's House", what does the narrator reveal about Aunt Beryl's attitude toward social classes?

Aunt Beryl sees herself as above all others because of her social status. She believes herself entitled to the luxury in which she lives and detaches herself from everything and everyone outside of her self-proclaimed realm. Poverty isn't welcome...

Three such high-profile productions in the space of a few months is unusual. Morahan has already won the Evening Standard and Critics' Circle awards for her performance and was unlucky to miss out to Helen Mirren at the Oliviers. But the combination of the play's brisk and thriller-like plotting, and the sense shared by everyone involved that the play still speaks to audiences in ways that feel fresh and interesting, means there is no fear of overkill.

The play, hugely controversial when first published and performed in Copenhagen in 1879, is about the unravelling of a family. Nora and Torvald Helmer believe they are happily married and on the brink of a blissful new phase of life: Torvald has been promoted to bank manager and their money worries are over. But Nora has a secret debt, incurred with good intentions and a forged signature, and with her husband's new power comes the threat of blackmail.

Over three acts the illusion of bourgeois contentment unravels, and the play culminates in a spectacular scene between the couple as Nora's lie is exposed and Torvald first blames, then forgives her – and is finally abandoned as Nora recognises the truth of her situation. She accuses her husband, and her father before him, of having used her as a doll, and declares herself unfit to be a wife or mother until she has learned to be herself. Ibsen's final stage direction, of the door closing behind her, is one of the most famous ever written.

Dollhouse (TV series) - Wikipedia


Dollhouse (Dark Carousel 1) by Anya Allyn - Goodreads

Posted by 2018 article

51q3xiVmdAL