Writer: Harold Smith
Art: Tim Kennedy & Rudy Lapick
Lettering: Bill Yoshida
Coloring: Barry Grossman & Gregg Suchow
Production: Gregg Suchow
Editor: Victor Gorelick
Editor-in-Chief: Richard Goldwater
Original Publication: Archie Comics Digest Magazine, No. 102
Cover Date: June, 1990
Length: 6 pages

I’ve decided to review a comic this week, mostly to give myself more time to work on the big review. This is actually the first Archie story that I ever read (excluding the cover gag), because it’s the first story in the first Archie digest that I ever got. It’s also the new story in the digest. Back then, new stories were credited, but reprints weren’t (these days, with everything credited, who knows?). Of course, not knowing anything about Archie back then, I assumed the entire thing was new.

Jughead invites Archie to attend a triple-bill monster festival with him on Saturday night, but Archie declines, because he’s taking Veronica to the “Grateful Zombies” concert. Jughead is impressed, because his broke ass couldn’t afford the tickets. Somehow, I can’t picture Jughead as a Deadhead, er,…Zombiehead? Archie explains he got a part-time job as a “stock boy” at the Riverdale Department Store on Saturdays from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM. He’ll cash his check at lunch time, and that’ll pay for dinner before the concert. Jughead is envious.

Think you’re funny? How often have you sat through “The Daily Show,” thinking, I could do that! Well, writing comedy isn’t for the weak, particularly as the TV networks continue to whittle down the slots for sitcoms. But there’s good news: even dramas such as “Ugly Betty” and “Desperate Housewives” are employing a few comedy writers—and there are rising standup comics who need joke help, as well. Here, eight comedy writers share their hard-won advice on how to get laughter down on the page—and get paid.

JIM FISHER was part of Second City’s Mainstage performers and taught comedy writing at the company’s training center. He’s written for the TV series “Dragon Tales” and “Young Hercules” and helped write the screenplay for The Beverly Hillbillies.

JON FRIEDMAN is the producer and host of “The Rejection Show,” a cult-hit live show of rejected material. His first book, Rejected: Tales of the Failed, Dumped and Canceled is due out this year.

As March begins, teachers and librarians may start thinking about celebrating Women’s History Month. And while a graphic novel about a feisty fictional heroine may not exactly fit the bill, it does celebrate strong women. Monsters Beware! By Rafael Rosado. Jorge Aguirre First Second. 2018. ISBN 9781626721807 PBK, $14.99. 170pp. Grades 3 and up Readers […]

We’re filling our weekend with previews, because there’s plenty of cool comics coming out right now. Here’s a look at Dodge City #1, a new series from BOOM! Studios about competitive dodgeball. This is not your gym teacher’s dodgeball. Here’s the 411: Josh Trujillo (Adventure Time) and Cara McGee (Over the Garden Wall) team up […]

Here’s a look at a book that came out last week: Jay Fosgitt’s Bodie Troll, an all-ages story about a not-very-scary troll: Written and illustrated by Jay Fosgitt (Rocket Raccoon & Groot), Bodie Troll is a rollicking fantasy adventure celebrating the importance of stalwart friendships and being true to oneself. Bodie Troll wants to be […]

A big USA Today story today said that deaf (and disabled)
people are being hired – by employers that would normally
not hire them in past years. And that the pay is at least
$10.00 per hour for these entry level jobs. Good news,
yes – just as long as these deaf people are able to advance
with promotions instead of being stuck in lifetime dead
end jobs! A picture is at:

Many deaf people hate the police. The Springfield Citizens
Police Academy (MA) is hoping to change all that. The
academy is accepting students for a 10-week course.
They learn what police officers face and deal with
on a daily basis, even to the point of putting their
lives in danger. Several deaf students, with
interpreters have taken the class, along with the
hearing students.

Rachel Shenton, just six years old, signed her
Oscar acceptance in British Sign Language. A
newspaper columnist said learning extra languages
has a big value. He is correct. A fact we didn’t know
is that she is from a 4-generation deaf family!

Writer: Harold Smith
Art: Tim Kennedy & Rudy Lapick
Lettering: Bill Yoshida
Coloring: Barry Grossman & Gregg Suchow
Production: Gregg Suchow
Editor: Victor Gorelick
Editor-in-Chief: Richard Goldwater
Original Publication: Archie Comics Digest Magazine, No. 102
Cover Date: June, 1990
Length: 6 pages

I’ve decided to review a comic this week, mostly to give myself more time to work on the big review. This is actually the first Archie story that I ever read (excluding the cover gag), because it’s the first story in the first Archie digest that I ever got. It’s also the new story in the digest. Back then, new stories were credited, but reprints weren’t (these days, with everything credited, who knows?). Of course, not knowing anything about Archie back then, I assumed the entire thing was new.

Jughead invites Archie to attend a triple-bill monster festival with him on Saturday night, but Archie declines, because he’s taking Veronica to the “Grateful Zombies” concert. Jughead is impressed, because his broke ass couldn’t afford the tickets. Somehow, I can’t picture Jughead as a Deadhead, er,…Zombiehead? Archie explains he got a part-time job as a “stock boy” at the Riverdale Department Store on Saturdays from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM. He’ll cash his check at lunch time, and that’ll pay for dinner before the concert. Jughead is envious.

Writer: Harold Smith
Art: Tim Kennedy & Rudy Lapick
Lettering: Bill Yoshida
Coloring: Barry Grossman & Gregg Suchow
Production: Gregg Suchow
Editor: Victor Gorelick
Editor-in-Chief: Richard Goldwater
Original Publication: Archie Comics Digest Magazine, No. 102
Cover Date: June, 1990
Length: 6 pages

I’ve decided to review a comic this week, mostly to give myself more time to work on the big review. This is actually the first Archie story that I ever read (excluding the cover gag), because it’s the first story in the first Archie digest that I ever got. It’s also the new story in the digest. Back then, new stories were credited, but reprints weren’t (these days, with everything credited, who knows?). Of course, not knowing anything about Archie back then, I assumed the entire thing was new.

Jughead invites Archie to attend a triple-bill monster festival with him on Saturday night, but Archie declines, because he’s taking Veronica to the “Grateful Zombies” concert. Jughead is impressed, because his broke ass couldn’t afford the tickets. Somehow, I can’t picture Jughead as a Deadhead, er,…Zombiehead? Archie explains he got a part-time job as a “stock boy” at the Riverdale Department Store on Saturdays from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM. He’ll cash his check at lunch time, and that’ll pay for dinner before the concert. Jughead is envious.

Think you’re funny? How often have you sat through “The Daily Show,” thinking, I could do that! Well, writing comedy isn’t for the weak, particularly as the TV networks continue to whittle down the slots for sitcoms. But there’s good news: even dramas such as “Ugly Betty” and “Desperate Housewives” are employing a few comedy writers—and there are rising standup comics who need joke help, as well. Here, eight comedy writers share their hard-won advice on how to get laughter down on the page—and get paid.

JIM FISHER was part of Second City’s Mainstage performers and taught comedy writing at the company’s training center. He’s written for the TV series “Dragon Tales” and “Young Hercules” and helped write the screenplay for The Beverly Hillbillies.

JON FRIEDMAN is the producer and host of “The Rejection Show,” a cult-hit live show of rejected material. His first book, Rejected: Tales of the Failed, Dumped and Canceled is due out this year.

As March begins, teachers and librarians may start thinking about celebrating Women’s History Month. And while a graphic novel about a feisty fictional heroine may not exactly fit the bill, it does celebrate strong women. Monsters Beware! By Rafael Rosado. Jorge Aguirre First Second. 2018. ISBN 9781626721807 PBK, $14.99. 170pp. Grades 3 and up Readers […]

We’re filling our weekend with previews, because there’s plenty of cool comics coming out right now. Here’s a look at Dodge City #1, a new series from BOOM! Studios about competitive dodgeball. This is not your gym teacher’s dodgeball. Here’s the 411: Josh Trujillo (Adventure Time) and Cara McGee (Over the Garden Wall) team up […]

Here’s a look at a book that came out last week: Jay Fosgitt’s Bodie Troll, an all-ages story about a not-very-scary troll: Written and illustrated by Jay Fosgitt (Rocket Raccoon & Groot), Bodie Troll is a rollicking fantasy adventure celebrating the importance of stalwart friendships and being true to oneself. Bodie Troll wants to be […]

Writer: Harold Smith
Art: Tim Kennedy & Rudy Lapick
Lettering: Bill Yoshida
Coloring: Barry Grossman & Gregg Suchow
Production: Gregg Suchow
Editor: Victor Gorelick
Editor-in-Chief: Richard Goldwater
Original Publication: Archie Comics Digest Magazine, No. 102
Cover Date: June, 1990
Length: 6 pages

I’ve decided to review a comic this week, mostly to give myself more time to work on the big review. This is actually the first Archie story that I ever read (excluding the cover gag), because it’s the first story in the first Archie digest that I ever got. It’s also the new story in the digest. Back then, new stories were credited, but reprints weren’t (these days, with everything credited, who knows?). Of course, not knowing anything about Archie back then, I assumed the entire thing was new.

Jughead invites Archie to attend a triple-bill monster festival with him on Saturday night, but Archie declines, because he’s taking Veronica to the “Grateful Zombies” concert. Jughead is impressed, because his broke ass couldn’t afford the tickets. Somehow, I can’t picture Jughead as a Deadhead, er,…Zombiehead? Archie explains he got a part-time job as a “stock boy” at the Riverdale Department Store on Saturdays from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM. He’ll cash his check at lunch time, and that’ll pay for dinner before the concert. Jughead is envious.

Think you’re funny? How often have you sat through “The Daily Show,” thinking, I could do that! Well, writing comedy isn’t for the weak, particularly as the TV networks continue to whittle down the slots for sitcoms. But there’s good news: even dramas such as “Ugly Betty” and “Desperate Housewives” are employing a few comedy writers—and there are rising standup comics who need joke help, as well. Here, eight comedy writers share their hard-won advice on how to get laughter down on the page—and get paid.

JIM FISHER was part of Second City’s Mainstage performers and taught comedy writing at the company’s training center. He’s written for the TV series “Dragon Tales” and “Young Hercules” and helped write the screenplay for The Beverly Hillbillies.

JON FRIEDMAN is the producer and host of “The Rejection Show,” a cult-hit live show of rejected material. His first book, Rejected: Tales of the Failed, Dumped and Canceled is due out this year.

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Avengers & the Infinity Gauntlet (Avengers Digest.

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