Last fall, Diesel gave us “Go With the Flaw,” a gritty, glamorous celebration of ugliness, created by Publicis Italy and directed by François Rousselet.

Now, the second installation of the campaign, “Keep the World Flawed” (also directed by Rousselet), leans hard into the subject matter. Think of the first ad as a manifesto. This new piece takes it further, illustrating just how hopeless it is to hide your flaws in the first place.

Remember that ad-turned-fake-news-meme about a woman who supposedly had so much plastic surgery that, when all of the flaws came out in her children, her husband sued?

Last fall, Diesel gave us “Go With the Flaw,” a gritty, glamorous celebration of ugliness, created by Publicis Italy and directed by François Rousselet.

Now, the second installation of the campaign, “Keep the World Flawed” (also directed by Rousselet), leans hard into the subject matter. Think of the first ad as a manifesto. This new piece takes it further, illustrating just how hopeless it is to hide your flaws in the first place.

Remember that ad-turned-fake-news-meme about a woman who supposedly had so much plastic surgery that, when all of the flaws came out in her children, her husband sued?

In honor of International Women's Day on March 8, Google is swapping out its usual rainbow-colored search page logo in order to celebrate the work of 12 female artists from around the world through interactive Doodles.

Each artist shared a personal story through a series of visual narratives that represent "a moment, person or event that has impacted their lives as women," according to a Google blog post , while also conveying universal themes of womanhood.

"We hope that the combined power of words and images help bring these stories to life in a way that invokes feelings of understanding, empathy and spirit of the day," wrote Lydia Nichols and Alyssa Winans, Google's project leads for International Women's Day, in the post.

The Celebrating Maths Project  is a series of three short videos written to give parents a range of mathematical games and puzzles to play with their children.

The first video, for parents of children aged 4-5, gives ideas for finding maths in everyday situations. The second and third videos, for ages 6-7 and 8+, give strategy games that can be played with simple equipment and an active mind!

The Celebrating Maths Project Letter  can be sent to parents to explain about the project - it includes a link to this page.

Welcome to our Christmas pages. I am so glad you came to visit. Whether you are looking to build meaningful traditions with your family, learn more about the history of Christmas and its symbols, or find creative ideas for cooking and crafting, I hope you will be inspired here!

Christians of every denomination recognize the birth of Christ as one of the most significant events in all of history. There is unspeakable profundity in the fact that the God of the Universe came to dwell on earth as a man. Yet, the great importance of this event is often lost in western culture, as is the intriguing history associated with the symbols, stories and songs of Christmas. For this reason, I have set out to create a content rich site for those seeking to better understand the history of Christmas, as well as the traditions associated with the holiday.

As you celebrate the birth of our Savior, my prayer is that our Christmas pages will help to deepen your appreciation of this special holiday. If you have any questions that are not answered on this site, or if you have suggestions for ways that we can improve content, please contact us .

Last fall, Diesel gave us “Go With the Flaw,” a gritty, glamorous celebration of ugliness, created by Publicis Italy and directed by François Rousselet.

Now, the second installation of the campaign, “Keep the World Flawed” (also directed by Rousselet), leans hard into the subject matter. Think of the first ad as a manifesto. This new piece takes it further, illustrating just how hopeless it is to hide your flaws in the first place.

Remember that ad-turned-fake-news-meme about a woman who supposedly had so much plastic surgery that, when all of the flaws came out in her children, her husband sued?

In honor of International Women's Day on March 8, Google is swapping out its usual rainbow-colored search page logo in order to celebrate the work of 12 female artists from around the world through interactive Doodles.

Each artist shared a personal story through a series of visual narratives that represent "a moment, person or event that has impacted their lives as women," according to a Google blog post , while also conveying universal themes of womanhood.

"We hope that the combined power of words and images help bring these stories to life in a way that invokes feelings of understanding, empathy and spirit of the day," wrote Lydia Nichols and Alyssa Winans, Google's project leads for International Women's Day, in the post.

Last fall, Diesel gave us “Go With the Flaw,” a gritty, glamorous celebration of ugliness, created by Publicis Italy and directed by François Rousselet.

Now, the second installation of the campaign, “Keep the World Flawed” (also directed by Rousselet), leans hard into the subject matter. Think of the first ad as a manifesto. This new piece takes it further, illustrating just how hopeless it is to hide your flaws in the first place.

Remember that ad-turned-fake-news-meme about a woman who supposedly had so much plastic surgery that, when all of the flaws came out in her children, her husband sued?

In honor of International Women's Day on March 8, Google is swapping out its usual rainbow-colored search page logo in order to celebrate the work of 12 female artists from around the world through interactive Doodles.

Each artist shared a personal story through a series of visual narratives that represent "a moment, person or event that has impacted their lives as women," according to a Google blog post , while also conveying universal themes of womanhood.

"We hope that the combined power of words and images help bring these stories to life in a way that invokes feelings of understanding, empathy and spirit of the day," wrote Lydia Nichols and Alyssa Winans, Google's project leads for International Women's Day, in the post.

The Celebrating Maths Project  is a series of three short videos written to give parents a range of mathematical games and puzzles to play with their children.

The first video, for parents of children aged 4-5, gives ideas for finding maths in everyday situations. The second and third videos, for ages 6-7 and 8+, give strategy games that can be played with simple equipment and an active mind!

The Celebrating Maths Project Letter  can be sent to parents to explain about the project - it includes a link to this page.

Welcome to our Christmas pages. I am so glad you came to visit. Whether you are looking to build meaningful traditions with your family, learn more about the history of Christmas and its symbols, or find creative ideas for cooking and crafting, I hope you will be inspired here!

Christians of every denomination recognize the birth of Christ as one of the most significant events in all of history. There is unspeakable profundity in the fact that the God of the Universe came to dwell on earth as a man. Yet, the great importance of this event is often lost in western culture, as is the intriguing history associated with the symbols, stories and songs of Christmas. For this reason, I have set out to create a content rich site for those seeking to better understand the history of Christmas, as well as the traditions associated with the holiday.

As you celebrate the birth of our Savior, my prayer is that our Christmas pages will help to deepen your appreciation of this special holiday. If you have any questions that are not answered on this site, or if you have suggestions for ways that we can improve content, please contact us .

Many special guests and regular performers have included Sting, Gary Oldman, Adrian Belew, Seal, Ewan McGregor, Joe Sumner, Jerry Harrison, Gavin Rossdale, Mike Garson, Simon Le Bon, Earl Slick, Corey Taylor, Gerry Leonard, Perry Farrell, Gaby Moreno, Joe Elliot, Angelo Moore, Carmine Rojas, Tom Chaplin, La Roux, Paul Dempsey (Something For Kate), Christy Dignam (Aslan), The London Community Gospel Choir, The Harlem Gospel, and Former International Spaceship Commander Chris Hadfield.

Last fall, Diesel gave us “Go With the Flaw,” a gritty, glamorous celebration of ugliness, created by Publicis Italy and directed by François Rousselet.

Now, the second installation of the campaign, “Keep the World Flawed” (also directed by Rousselet), leans hard into the subject matter. Think of the first ad as a manifesto. This new piece takes it further, illustrating just how hopeless it is to hide your flaws in the first place.

Remember that ad-turned-fake-news-meme about a woman who supposedly had so much plastic surgery that, when all of the flaws came out in her children, her husband sued?

In honor of International Women's Day on March 8, Google is swapping out its usual rainbow-colored search page logo in order to celebrate the work of 12 female artists from around the world through interactive Doodles.

Each artist shared a personal story through a series of visual narratives that represent "a moment, person or event that has impacted their lives as women," according to a Google blog post , while also conveying universal themes of womanhood.

"We hope that the combined power of words and images help bring these stories to life in a way that invokes feelings of understanding, empathy and spirit of the day," wrote Lydia Nichols and Alyssa Winans, Google's project leads for International Women's Day, in the post.

The Celebrating Maths Project  is a series of three short videos written to give parents a range of mathematical games and puzzles to play with their children.

The first video, for parents of children aged 4-5, gives ideas for finding maths in everyday situations. The second and third videos, for ages 6-7 and 8+, give strategy games that can be played with simple equipment and an active mind!

The Celebrating Maths Project Letter  can be sent to parents to explain about the project - it includes a link to this page.

Celebrating David Bowie


February 3rd | Celebrating Charles

Posted by 2018 article

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