I hope you enjoy the effort and maybe even the majesty of these silver coins and a time when people had actual precious metal in their pockets for everyday purchases, when money was real.

On the still life side I tend to think that if you take the picture looking down at you assembly of items, that it looks more commercial like an ad for something. When the image is more straight on with the camera at desk level as if your work was waiting for you to sit down and do it, then I think perhaps the result is more painterly or artistic. I am still working these things for what is the most ideal for a viewer to enjoy. These scenes were at a desk with morning ambient light from the window.

This is the only foreign coin pictured in this group. It is a Ceylon 5 Rupee coin made of .925 percent of silver. The front of coin (not pictured) has a Buddha temple on it and the reverse has the number 2500 in the center commemorating 2500 years of Buddhism and is encircled by rings of floral and zoological symbols. Quite lovely really. The silver coin was issued under Queen Elizabeth II in 1957 when Ceylon was a British Commonwealth Nation. Sri Lanka’s identity was not until 1972. Its original mintage was 500,000 but 258,000 were returned to the mint for melting in 1962.

I hope you enjoy the effort and maybe even the majesty of these silver coins and a time when people had actual precious metal in their pockets for everyday purchases, when money was real.

On the still life side I tend to think that if you take the picture looking down at you assembly of items, that it looks more commercial like an ad for something. When the image is more straight on with the camera at desk level as if your work was waiting for you to sit down and do it, then I think perhaps the result is more painterly or artistic. I am still working these things for what is the most ideal for a viewer to enjoy. These scenes were at a desk with morning ambient light from the window.

This is the only foreign coin pictured in this group. It is a Ceylon 5 Rupee coin made of .925 percent of silver. The front of coin (not pictured) has a Buddha temple on it and the reverse has the number 2500 in the center commemorating 2500 years of Buddhism and is encircled by rings of floral and zoological symbols. Quite lovely really. The silver coin was issued under Queen Elizabeth II in 1957 when Ceylon was a British Commonwealth Nation. Sri Lanka’s identity was not until 1972. Its original mintage was 500,000 but 258,000 were returned to the mint for melting in 1962.

Coin collecting is an interesting hobby. Most collectors start as children, some are handed over their collections by their parents or grand-parents and discover the joy of collecting at an early age, some come to collecting later in life, triggered by an interesting coin issued for an event or by an interesting coin issue with the prospect of potential value increase.

Coin collecting is one of the oldest hobbies on record. Emperor Augustus liked to give old coins to his friends and many coins of the late Roman period were based on coin designs from years before, which suggests that coins were stored as a matter of policy. Byzantine coin designs were similarly full of visual references to coins circulated centuries earlier. 

Coin collecting was one of the more innocent pursuits of the notorious Pope Boniface VIII at the end of the 12th century. The Italian poet and thinker Petrarch collected coins on his travels, while at least two United States Presidents, Thomas Jefferson and John Quincy Adams, had a keen personal and professional interest in coin collecting. Adams, who served as President from 1825 to 1829, not only collected but studied coins and used his knowledge to help guide the development of early American currency.

Sometimes just building a coin collection can be hard enough, you do not have to worry about picking the wrong Coin Supplies at the Coin Supply Store. We genuinely care about the safety and security of your coin collections. All of our Coin Collecting Supplies are selected only after we determine that they will be able to safely and securely store any coin for many years.

We want you to completely enjoy coin collecting. If you ever have any questions about coins or supplies, please contact us. You can call us at 888-310-2646 or e-mail us at [email protected]

I hope you enjoy the effort and maybe even the majesty of these silver coins and a time when people had actual precious metal in their pockets for everyday purchases, when money was real.

On the still life side I tend to think that if you take the picture looking down at you assembly of items, that it looks more commercial like an ad for something. When the image is more straight on with the camera at desk level as if your work was waiting for you to sit down and do it, then I think perhaps the result is more painterly or artistic. I am still working these things for what is the most ideal for a viewer to enjoy. These scenes were at a desk with morning ambient light from the window.

This is the only foreign coin pictured in this group. It is a Ceylon 5 Rupee coin made of .925 percent of silver. The front of coin (not pictured) has a Buddha temple on it and the reverse has the number 2500 in the center commemorating 2500 years of Buddhism and is encircled by rings of floral and zoological symbols. Quite lovely really. The silver coin was issued under Queen Elizabeth II in 1957 when Ceylon was a British Commonwealth Nation. Sri Lanka’s identity was not until 1972. Its original mintage was 500,000 but 258,000 were returned to the mint for melting in 1962.

Coin collecting is an interesting hobby. Most collectors start as children, some are handed over their collections by their parents or grand-parents and discover the joy of collecting at an early age, some come to collecting later in life, triggered by an interesting coin issued for an event or by an interesting coin issue with the prospect of potential value increase.

Coin collecting is one of the oldest hobbies on record. Emperor Augustus liked to give old coins to his friends and many coins of the late Roman period were based on coin designs from years before, which suggests that coins were stored as a matter of policy. Byzantine coin designs were similarly full of visual references to coins circulated centuries earlier. 

Coin collecting was one of the more innocent pursuits of the notorious Pope Boniface VIII at the end of the 12th century. The Italian poet and thinker Petrarch collected coins on his travels, while at least two United States Presidents, Thomas Jefferson and John Quincy Adams, had a keen personal and professional interest in coin collecting. Adams, who served as President from 1825 to 1829, not only collected but studied coins and used his knowledge to help guide the development of early American currency.

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