Nothing dates like yesterday’s controversy, but you can still see why William Friedkin ’s notorious thriller set in New York’s late-’70s gay S&M scene famously incensed the city’s gay community. Following Al Pacino ’s straight undercover cop as he’s sent as bait into Manhattan’s leather underground to hook a bloody homosexual serial killer, Cruising is a dark, disturbing ride, a memorably grimy portrait of pre-Giuliani New York as a city crumbling into sleaze. Equally, though, with Pacino adrift on a sea of moustachioed macho men in his little leather Nazi cap, it’s also a complete hoot.

Anyone who doesn’t choke laughing as they watch him get out of his head on poppers and unleash some furious Method disco dancing is made of stone. The most screwed-up Hollywood movie of the ’80s, Cruising plays like Street Hassle-era Lou Reed wrote it in collaboration with Village People. Meanwhile, in the fascinated depictions of night-club hedonism that survive in the final cut, a blue-lit, pre-Aids netherworld of sucking, fucking and fisting, you glimpse traces of the even more vividly graphic movie Friedkin claims he originally shot, prompting shocked censors to cut a reported 40 minutes.

By 1979, when producer Jerry Weintraub gave him the chance to adapt Gerald Walker’s 1970 noir novel, Friedkin was coming off the back-to-back box office failures of The Brink’s Job and Sorcerer, and badly needed a hit. Inspired by a real ’60s murder case, Walker’s novel offered an opportunity to revisit the gritty urban terrain of Friedkin’s breakthrough, The French Connection. Pacino, too, whose career had been in a slump since Dog Day Afternoon four years earlier, may have thought he was signing on for a funky, edgy undercover-cop movie in the Serpico mould.

Nothing dates like yesterday’s controversy, but you can still see why William Friedkin ’s notorious thriller set in New York’s late-’70s gay S&M scene famously incensed the city’s gay community. Following Al Pacino ’s straight undercover cop as he’s sent as bait into Manhattan’s leather underground to hook a bloody homosexual serial killer, Cruising is a dark, disturbing ride, a memorably grimy portrait of pre-Giuliani New York as a city crumbling into sleaze. Equally, though, with Pacino adrift on a sea of moustachioed macho men in his little leather Nazi cap, it’s also a complete hoot.

Anyone who doesn’t choke laughing as they watch him get out of his head on poppers and unleash some furious Method disco dancing is made of stone. The most screwed-up Hollywood movie of the ’80s, Cruising plays like Street Hassle-era Lou Reed wrote it in collaboration with Village People. Meanwhile, in the fascinated depictions of night-club hedonism that survive in the final cut, a blue-lit, pre-Aids netherworld of sucking, fucking and fisting, you glimpse traces of the even more vividly graphic movie Friedkin claims he originally shot, prompting shocked censors to cut a reported 40 minutes.

By 1979, when producer Jerry Weintraub gave him the chance to adapt Gerald Walker’s 1970 noir novel, Friedkin was coming off the back-to-back box office failures of The Brink’s Job and Sorcerer, and badly needed a hit. Inspired by a real ’60s murder case, Walker’s novel offered an opportunity to revisit the gritty urban terrain of Friedkin’s breakthrough, The French Connection. Pacino, too, whose career had been in a slump since Dog Day Afternoon four years earlier, may have thought he was signing on for a funky, edgy undercover-cop movie in the Serpico mould.

Cruising is a 1980 crime film written and directed by William Friedkin , and starring Al Pacino , Paul Sorvino , and Karen Allen . It is loosely based on the novel of the same name by New York Times reporter Gerald Walker about a serial killer targeting gay men, particularly those men associated with the leather scene in the late 1970s. The title is a play on words with a dual meaning because "cruising" can describe police officers on patrol and gay men who are cruising for sex .

Poorly reviewed by critics upon release, Cruising was a modest financial success. The shooting and promotion were dogged by gay rights protesters, who believed that the film stigmatized them. The film is also notable for its open-ended finale, further complicated by the director's incoherent changes in the rough cut and synopsis as well as other production issues. [2]

In New York City during the middle of a hot summer, body parts of men are showing up in the Hudson River . The police suspect it to be the work of a serial killer who is picking up homosexual men at West Village bars like the Eagle's Nest, the Ramrod, and the Cock Pit, then taking them to cheap rooming houses or motels, tying them up and stabbing them to death.

Cruising (Karaoke Version) [In the Style of Gwyneth.


uncut Version Of cruising ? | urban75 forums

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