On 14 December 2005, Lu Yi signed an agreement with Shanghai Cord Blood Bank, under the terms of which the bank would store umbilical cord blood of her soon-to-be-born daughter for twenty years in exchange for a one-time fee of 16,060 yuan.

Cord blood banks collect, process and store hematopoietic stem cells taken from umbilical cord blood at the time a mother gives birth for potential future use such as transplant operations the child may have. Doing so gives peace of mind to expectant mothers who believe they are taking an additional measure to ensure the health of their precious child.

However, in early September, Lu Yi received a text message that shattered that peace of mind as a new mother. The message read, “Your baby’s blood tested positive for anaerobic bacteria. Storing it is completely pointless.”

Standing on the quay, Mrs Wu jokes that there are more pigs than fish in Jiapingtang river. But she isn't smiling. The 48-year-old fisherwoman, who lives in Xinfeng, a sleepy country village, recalls splashing about in the river as a child on sticky summer days. Today it is inky black, covered in a slick of lime green algae, and it smells like a blocked drain. "Look at the water, who would dare to jump in?" says Wu. At her feet a dead piglet bobs on the river's surface, bouncing against the shore.

This area of Zhejiang province, 60 miles from Shanghai, has become the subject of public and media scrutiny after more than 16,000 dead pigs were found in tributaries of the city's river, the Huangpu, a source of tapwater. As clean-up efforts wind down, mystery surrounds the cause of the pigs' demise and their appearance in the river.

As public concerns about water safety grow, what has emerged is a picture of a rural region marred by catastrophic environmental damage, inherent malpractice and a black market meat trade.

Brand: Shanghai Blood Administration Office
Media: TV
Category: Public interest
Agency: McCann
Geo: China
Shanghai Blood Administration Office: The bar
Advertising Agency: McCann Healthcare Worldwide, Shanghai, China
Executive Creative Director: Kevin Lee
Creative Directors: Band Bai, Danny Li
Art Directors: Danny Li, Band Bai, QinQian
Copywriters: Kevin Lee, Bati Wu
Director: Joy Jiao
Producer: Manford Zhang
Business Director: Steven Hua
Account Manager: Vincent Wu
Published: January 2015

On 14 December 2005, Lu Yi signed an agreement with Shanghai Cord Blood Bank, under the terms of which the bank would store umbilical cord blood of her soon-to-be-born daughter for twenty years in exchange for a one-time fee of 16,060 yuan.

Cord blood banks collect, process and store hematopoietic stem cells taken from umbilical cord blood at the time a mother gives birth for potential future use such as transplant operations the child may have. Doing so gives peace of mind to expectant mothers who believe they are taking an additional measure to ensure the health of their precious child.

However, in early September, Lu Yi received a text message that shattered that peace of mind as a new mother. The message read, “Your baby’s blood tested positive for anaerobic bacteria. Storing it is completely pointless.”

On 14 December 2005, Lu Yi signed an agreement with Shanghai Cord Blood Bank, under the terms of which the bank would store umbilical cord blood of her soon-to-be-born daughter for twenty years in exchange for a one-time fee of 16,060 yuan.

Cord blood banks collect, process and store hematopoietic stem cells taken from umbilical cord blood at the time a mother gives birth for potential future use such as transplant operations the child may have. Doing so gives peace of mind to expectant mothers who believe they are taking an additional measure to ensure the health of their precious child.

However, in early September, Lu Yi received a text message that shattered that peace of mind as a new mother. The message read, “Your baby’s blood tested positive for anaerobic bacteria. Storing it is completely pointless.”

Standing on the quay, Mrs Wu jokes that there are more pigs than fish in Jiapingtang river. But she isn't smiling. The 48-year-old fisherwoman, who lives in Xinfeng, a sleepy country village, recalls splashing about in the river as a child on sticky summer days. Today it is inky black, covered in a slick of lime green algae, and it smells like a blocked drain. "Look at the water, who would dare to jump in?" says Wu. At her feet a dead piglet bobs on the river's surface, bouncing against the shore.

This area of Zhejiang province, 60 miles from Shanghai, has become the subject of public and media scrutiny after more than 16,000 dead pigs were found in tributaries of the city's river, the Huangpu, a source of tapwater. As clean-up efforts wind down, mystery surrounds the cause of the pigs' demise and their appearance in the river.

As public concerns about water safety grow, what has emerged is a picture of a rural region marred by catastrophic environmental damage, inherent malpractice and a black market meat trade.

On 14 December 2005, Lu Yi signed an agreement with Shanghai Cord Blood Bank, under the terms of which the bank would store umbilical cord blood of her soon-to-be-born daughter for twenty years in exchange for a one-time fee of 16,060 yuan.

Cord blood banks collect, process and store hematopoietic stem cells taken from umbilical cord blood at the time a mother gives birth for potential future use such as transplant operations the child may have. Doing so gives peace of mind to expectant mothers who believe they are taking an additional measure to ensure the health of their precious child.

However, in early September, Lu Yi received a text message that shattered that peace of mind as a new mother. The message read, “Your baby’s blood tested positive for anaerobic bacteria. Storing it is completely pointless.”

Standing on the quay, Mrs Wu jokes that there are more pigs than fish in Jiapingtang river. But she isn't smiling. The 48-year-old fisherwoman, who lives in Xinfeng, a sleepy country village, recalls splashing about in the river as a child on sticky summer days. Today it is inky black, covered in a slick of lime green algae, and it smells like a blocked drain. "Look at the water, who would dare to jump in?" says Wu. At her feet a dead piglet bobs on the river's surface, bouncing against the shore.

This area of Zhejiang province, 60 miles from Shanghai, has become the subject of public and media scrutiny after more than 16,000 dead pigs were found in tributaries of the city's river, the Huangpu, a source of tapwater. As clean-up efforts wind down, mystery surrounds the cause of the pigs' demise and their appearance in the river.

As public concerns about water safety grow, what has emerged is a picture of a rural region marred by catastrophic environmental damage, inherent malpractice and a black market meat trade.

Brand: Shanghai Blood Administration Office
Media: TV
Category: Public interest
Agency: McCann
Geo: China
Shanghai Blood Administration Office: The bar
Advertising Agency: McCann Healthcare Worldwide, Shanghai, China
Executive Creative Director: Kevin Lee
Creative Directors: Band Bai, Danny Li
Art Directors: Danny Li, Band Bai, QinQian
Copywriters: Kevin Lee, Bati Wu
Director: Joy Jiao
Producer: Manford Zhang
Business Director: Steven Hua
Account Manager: Vincent Wu
Published: January 2015

Chicken and duck blood soup ( Chinese : 鸡鸭血汤 ; pinyin : jī yā xiě tāng ) is a Shanghainese soup-based blood dish , using the blood of chicken and duck as a principal ingredient. Created by Xu Fuquan, a hawker from Shanghai, and described to be sour and spicy in taste, the dish is viewed as a healthy food with medicinal value in Shanghai. Kellie Schmitt of CNN describes the dish as one of "Shanghai's weirdest foods".

Chicken and duck blood soup was invented by little-known Shanghainese hawker Xu Fuquan, who made the dish by mixing hot chicken and duck blood with the head and feet of a chicken, before boiling it in an iron pot, which he dubbed a "metal cow". [1] In 1973, during his visit to Shanghai, then- King of Cambodia Norodom Sihanouk tried chicken and duck blood soup and reportedly enjoyed the dish a lot, having consumed countless bowls of it. [2]

The soup is made by boiling the blood of chicken and duck, alongside a handful of chicken organs and other body parts. [3] Chicken and duck blood soup is described to have a sour-spicy taste. [4] The dish is viewed as a healthy food with medicinal value in Shanghai. [5]

Shanghai Blood Administration: The knife - YouTube


Shanghai Blood Administration: The flower - YouTube

Posted by 2018 article

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