00:57 Earthquake in Alaska Prompts Immediate Evacuation Magnitude 7.9 earthquake rattles residents in middle of the night.

Tuesday's 7.9 magnitude earthquake in the Gulf of Alaska sent vibrations through the earth that caused water to rise and fall in wells in Florida, thousands of miles away.

Sensors near Fort Lauderdale and Madison, near the Georgia border, showed a  minor change in water levels after the earthquake, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS).

Yes, it was hot and humid on Monday. Yes, we have a change in our weather today. NO, there is no correlation between the weather and the atmosphere and the Earth. I mean think about it. How could moist air (high humidity) affect the crust or core of the Earth? It certainly cannot penetrate the surface of the Earth.

So how do earthquakes occur? An earthquake is caused by a sudden slip on a fault. The earth’s tectonic plates constantly move, but they can get stuck at their edges due to friction. When the stress on the edge of a tectonic plate overcomes the friction, there is an earthquake that releases energy in waves that travel through the earth’s crust and cause the shaking that we feel.

As a native Californian, I have either felt or reported on all major earthquakes in our state. From the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989 (6.9) to the Landers Earthquake in 1992 (7.3), Northridge Earthquake 1994 (6.7) and of course the Napa Earthquake 2014 (6.0). Each earthquake had distinctly different weather conditions. From the blazing, dry heat of the Landers Earthquake in the Mojave Desert to the early morning Napa Quake which reach a seasonal high of 83 degrees later in the day.

The overall strength of a building is a function of all of the components – walls, floors, roof, and foundation – working together as a unit. When an earthquake or high wind strikes the house, the walls and roof bear the brunt of these forces. A fully sheathed wall of plywood or OSB, properly connected to the foundation below and roof above, is a strong barrier that resists the persistent forces of wind and earthquakes. Laboratory tests and field evaluations show that sheathing with plywood or OSB can help make a house two to three times more able to withstand high winds and earthquakes.

Texas Straight-Line Wind Damage Assessment Report
This report summarizes the findings of a team of structural engineers who visited the site shortly after the windstorm to assess the damages sustained by residences as a result of the high winds. Download Texas Straight-Line Wind Damage Assessment Report , Form SP-1182.

Texas Tornado Damage Assessment Report
A report of damage assessments from the December 26, 2015, tornado storm near Dallas, Texas. Forensic evidence suggests much of the damage occurred along the outer edges of the storm's path, where wind speeds appeared to be lower. Wind-resistant construction recommendations included. Download Texas Tornado Damage Assessment Report , Form SP-1177.

Since ancient times, the notion that weather can somehow foreshadow coming seismic activity has been the topic of much discussion and debate. [1] Geologist Russell Robinson has described "earthquake weather" as one of the most common pseudoscientific methods of predicting earthquakes . [2]

It has been proposed by W. J. Humphreys that earthquake weather is not of geological causes, but merely a psychological manifestation. Humphreys argued that "the general state of irritation and sensitiveness developed in us during the hot, calm, perhaps sultry weather given this name, inclines us to sharper observation of earthquake disturbances and accentuates the impression they make on our senses, so that we retain more vivid memories of such quakes while possibly over-looking entirely the occurrences on other more soothing days". [5]

Some recent research has found a correlation between a sudden relative spike in atmospheric temperature 2–5 days before an earthquake. It is speculated that this rise is caused by the movement of ions within the earth's crust, related to an oncoming earthquake. However, the atmospheric changes are caused by the earthquake, rather than the earthquake being caused by any change in atmospheric conditions. Furthermore, this relative temperature change would not cause any single recognizable weather pattern that could be labelled "earthquake weather". [6] [7]

00:57 Earthquake in Alaska Prompts Immediate Evacuation Magnitude 7.9 earthquake rattles residents in middle of the night.

Tuesday's 7.9 magnitude earthquake in the Gulf of Alaska sent vibrations through the earth that caused water to rise and fall in wells in Florida, thousands of miles away.

Sensors near Fort Lauderdale and Madison, near the Georgia border, showed a  minor change in water levels after the earthquake, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS).

Yes, it was hot and humid on Monday. Yes, we have a change in our weather today. NO, there is no correlation between the weather and the atmosphere and the Earth. I mean think about it. How could moist air (high humidity) affect the crust or core of the Earth? It certainly cannot penetrate the surface of the Earth.

So how do earthquakes occur? An earthquake is caused by a sudden slip on a fault. The earth’s tectonic plates constantly move, but they can get stuck at their edges due to friction. When the stress on the edge of a tectonic plate overcomes the friction, there is an earthquake that releases energy in waves that travel through the earth’s crust and cause the shaking that we feel.

As a native Californian, I have either felt or reported on all major earthquakes in our state. From the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989 (6.9) to the Landers Earthquake in 1992 (7.3), Northridge Earthquake 1994 (6.7) and of course the Napa Earthquake 2014 (6.0). Each earthquake had distinctly different weather conditions. From the blazing, dry heat of the Landers Earthquake in the Mojave Desert to the early morning Napa Quake which reach a seasonal high of 83 degrees later in the day.

The overall strength of a building is a function of all of the components – walls, floors, roof, and foundation – working together as a unit. When an earthquake or high wind strikes the house, the walls and roof bear the brunt of these forces. A fully sheathed wall of plywood or OSB, properly connected to the foundation below and roof above, is a strong barrier that resists the persistent forces of wind and earthquakes. Laboratory tests and field evaluations show that sheathing with plywood or OSB can help make a house two to three times more able to withstand high winds and earthquakes.

Texas Straight-Line Wind Damage Assessment Report
This report summarizes the findings of a team of structural engineers who visited the site shortly after the windstorm to assess the damages sustained by residences as a result of the high winds. Download Texas Straight-Line Wind Damage Assessment Report , Form SP-1182.

Texas Tornado Damage Assessment Report
A report of damage assessments from the December 26, 2015, tornado storm near Dallas, Texas. Forensic evidence suggests much of the damage occurred along the outer edges of the storm's path, where wind speeds appeared to be lower. Wind-resistant construction recommendations included. Download Texas Tornado Damage Assessment Report , Form SP-1177.

Since ancient times, the notion that weather can somehow foreshadow coming seismic activity has been the topic of much discussion and debate. [1] Geologist Russell Robinson has described "earthquake weather" as one of the most common pseudoscientific methods of predicting earthquakes . [2]

It has been proposed by W. J. Humphreys that earthquake weather is not of geological causes, but merely a psychological manifestation. Humphreys argued that "the general state of irritation and sensitiveness developed in us during the hot, calm, perhaps sultry weather given this name, inclines us to sharper observation of earthquake disturbances and accentuates the impression they make on our senses, so that we retain more vivid memories of such quakes while possibly over-looking entirely the occurrences on other more soothing days". [5]

Some recent research has found a correlation between a sudden relative spike in atmospheric temperature 2–5 days before an earthquake. It is speculated that this rise is caused by the movement of ions within the earth's crust, related to an oncoming earthquake. However, the atmospheric changes are caused by the earthquake, rather than the earthquake being caused by any change in atmospheric conditions. Furthermore, this relative temperature change would not cause any single recognizable weather pattern that could be labelled "earthquake weather". [6] [7]

from the album Guero · Copyright: Writer(s): Michael Simpson, Daniel Webster, Beck David Hansen, Mark Hicks, John King, Steve Washington, Mark Adams Lyrics Terms of Use

00:57 Earthquake in Alaska Prompts Immediate Evacuation Magnitude 7.9 earthquake rattles residents in middle of the night.

Tuesday's 7.9 magnitude earthquake in the Gulf of Alaska sent vibrations through the earth that caused water to rise and fall in wells in Florida, thousands of miles away.

Sensors near Fort Lauderdale and Madison, near the Georgia border, showed a  minor change in water levels after the earthquake, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS).

Yes, it was hot and humid on Monday. Yes, we have a change in our weather today. NO, there is no correlation between the weather and the atmosphere and the Earth. I mean think about it. How could moist air (high humidity) affect the crust or core of the Earth? It certainly cannot penetrate the surface of the Earth.

So how do earthquakes occur? An earthquake is caused by a sudden slip on a fault. The earth’s tectonic plates constantly move, but they can get stuck at their edges due to friction. When the stress on the edge of a tectonic plate overcomes the friction, there is an earthquake that releases energy in waves that travel through the earth’s crust and cause the shaking that we feel.

As a native Californian, I have either felt or reported on all major earthquakes in our state. From the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989 (6.9) to the Landers Earthquake in 1992 (7.3), Northridge Earthquake 1994 (6.7) and of course the Napa Earthquake 2014 (6.0). Each earthquake had distinctly different weather conditions. From the blazing, dry heat of the Landers Earthquake in the Mojave Desert to the early morning Napa Quake which reach a seasonal high of 83 degrees later in the day.

The overall strength of a building is a function of all of the components – walls, floors, roof, and foundation – working together as a unit. When an earthquake or high wind strikes the house, the walls and roof bear the brunt of these forces. A fully sheathed wall of plywood or OSB, properly connected to the foundation below and roof above, is a strong barrier that resists the persistent forces of wind and earthquakes. Laboratory tests and field evaluations show that sheathing with plywood or OSB can help make a house two to three times more able to withstand high winds and earthquakes.

Texas Straight-Line Wind Damage Assessment Report
This report summarizes the findings of a team of structural engineers who visited the site shortly after the windstorm to assess the damages sustained by residences as a result of the high winds. Download Texas Straight-Line Wind Damage Assessment Report , Form SP-1182.

Texas Tornado Damage Assessment Report
A report of damage assessments from the December 26, 2015, tornado storm near Dallas, Texas. Forensic evidence suggests much of the damage occurred along the outer edges of the storm's path, where wind speeds appeared to be lower. Wind-resistant construction recommendations included. Download Texas Tornado Damage Assessment Report , Form SP-1177.

00:57 Earthquake in Alaska Prompts Immediate Evacuation Magnitude 7.9 earthquake rattles residents in middle of the night.

Tuesday's 7.9 magnitude earthquake in the Gulf of Alaska sent vibrations through the earth that caused water to rise and fall in wells in Florida, thousands of miles away.

Sensors near Fort Lauderdale and Madison, near the Georgia border, showed a  minor change in water levels after the earthquake, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS).

Yes, it was hot and humid on Monday. Yes, we have a change in our weather today. NO, there is no correlation between the weather and the atmosphere and the Earth. I mean think about it. How could moist air (high humidity) affect the crust or core of the Earth? It certainly cannot penetrate the surface of the Earth.

So how do earthquakes occur? An earthquake is caused by a sudden slip on a fault. The earth’s tectonic plates constantly move, but they can get stuck at their edges due to friction. When the stress on the edge of a tectonic plate overcomes the friction, there is an earthquake that releases energy in waves that travel through the earth’s crust and cause the shaking that we feel.

As a native Californian, I have either felt or reported on all major earthquakes in our state. From the Loma Prieta Earthquake in 1989 (6.9) to the Landers Earthquake in 1992 (7.3), Northridge Earthquake 1994 (6.7) and of course the Napa Earthquake 2014 (6.0). Each earthquake had distinctly different weather conditions. From the blazing, dry heat of the Landers Earthquake in the Mojave Desert to the early morning Napa Quake which reach a seasonal high of 83 degrees later in the day.

00:57 Earthquake in Alaska Prompts Immediate Evacuation Magnitude 7.9 earthquake rattles residents in middle of the night.

Tuesday's 7.9 magnitude earthquake in the Gulf of Alaska sent vibrations through the earth that caused water to rise and fall in wells in Florida, thousands of miles away.

Sensors near Fort Lauderdale and Madison, near the Georgia border, showed a  minor change in water levels after the earthquake, according to the United States Geological Survey (USGS).

Earthquake Weather (album) - Wikipedia


CA earthquake report - The Weather Channel

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