Years ago, when I decided to become a writer, I decided I should read the classics I’d managed to dodge in school. While Heraclitus said it’s impossible to step into the same river twice, as a river is always changing, with books, they stay the same and we change. Reading books again helps me sort out how I’ve changed and why.

I’ve discovered some classics do not age well (I found Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe impenetrable), but others stayed potent for me ( Catcher in the Rye , The Great Gatsby ). It’s easy to forget there are both bad and good reasons for a classic to remain a classic, sometimes it’s not much more than cumulative advantage .

6 years ago I picked up a copy a Moby Dick in a used book store, read the first page and thought it quite inviting. Since then I’ve traveled with Moby Dick a dozen times, never finding the courage to dig in. I’d see it on my bookshelf, or on my desk, and it would gnaw at me: the book had become, all on it’s own, my private little white whale. And so last week, on vacation in Mexico it came along yet again. And I finally read the whole damn thing.

A masterful adaptation of the timeless literary classic, faithfully and beautifully rendered by an award-winning artist. In striking black-and-white illustrations, Chabouté retells the story of the Great American Novel. Captain Ahab strikes out on a voyage, obsessively seeking revenge on the great white whale that took his leg. This hardcover edition collects both of the Vents d’Ouest volumes, printed in English for the first time.

Years ago, when I decided to become a writer, I decided I should read the classics I’d managed to dodge in school. While Heraclitus said it’s impossible to step into the same river twice, as a river is always changing, with books, they stay the same and we change. Reading books again helps me sort out how I’ve changed and why.

I’ve discovered some classics do not age well (I found Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe impenetrable), but others stayed potent for me ( Catcher in the Rye , The Great Gatsby ). It’s easy to forget there are both bad and good reasons for a classic to remain a classic, sometimes it’s not much more than cumulative advantage .

6 years ago I picked up a copy a Moby Dick in a used book store, read the first page and thought it quite inviting. Since then I’ve traveled with Moby Dick a dozen times, never finding the courage to dig in. I’d see it on my bookshelf, or on my desk, and it would gnaw at me: the book had become, all on it’s own, my private little white whale. And so last week, on vacation in Mexico it came along yet again. And I finally read the whole damn thing.

A masterful adaptation of the timeless literary classic, faithfully and beautifully rendered by an award-winning artist. In striking black-and-white illustrations, Chabouté retells the story of the Great American Novel. Captain Ahab strikes out on a voyage, obsessively seeking revenge on the great white whale that took his leg. This hardcover edition collects both of the Vents d’Ouest volumes, printed in English for the first time.

Moby Dick: The Graphic Novel (Campfire Graphic Novels) [Lance Stahlberg, Herman Melville, Lalit Kumar] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. It was an ...

Moby-Dick; or, The Whale is a ... Beale's grouping closely, yet adapted it to what art demanded, and he changed the original's prosaic phrases into graphic figures of ...

Moby-Dick is an 1851 novel by Herman Melville that describes the voyage of the whaleship Pequod, led by Captain Ahab, who leads his crew on a …

Years ago, when I decided to become a writer, I decided I should read the classics I’d managed to dodge in school. While Heraclitus said it’s impossible to step into the same river twice, as a river is always changing, with books, they stay the same and we change. Reading books again helps me sort out how I’ve changed and why.

I’ve discovered some classics do not age well (I found Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe impenetrable), but others stayed potent for me ( Catcher in the Rye , The Great Gatsby ). It’s easy to forget there are both bad and good reasons for a classic to remain a classic, sometimes it’s not much more than cumulative advantage .

6 years ago I picked up a copy a Moby Dick in a used book store, read the first page and thought it quite inviting. Since then I’ve traveled with Moby Dick a dozen times, never finding the courage to dig in. I’d see it on my bookshelf, or on my desk, and it would gnaw at me: the book had become, all on it’s own, my private little white whale. And so last week, on vacation in Mexico it came along yet again. And I finally read the whole damn thing.

Adaptations of Moby-Dick - Wikipedia


Moby-Dick - Wikipedia

Posted by 2018 article

51BIdz3rvCL