Getting children to read is one of the primary goals of schools, community education organizations, and parent groups, and one of the most popular ways of doing that is the book fair. Though schools do raise money through book fairs, most event coordinators and booksellers agree that the main goal is literacy. “Putting books into kids’ hands—not fundraising—is still the primary motivation for book fairs. There’s a lot of focus on making sure that children are reading,” says Alan Boyko, vice president of product development for Scholastic Inc. , which provides book fairs to about 50,000 schools nationwide.

But running a book fair that will get kids excited about reading takes more than setting a date and contacting your local or national bookseller. According to the experts, you need to organize, publicize, merchandise—and don’t forget to make it fun.

The first step to book fair success is planning ahead and marshalling enough volunteers. “Start early and have a plan,” says Diane Trovato, who runs book fairs in the Boston area under the name Books, Books, Books. She recommends working with teachers, librarians, or reading specialists to coordinate book selections to curriculum and a chosen theme, as well as to student interests and reading levels.

One of the most quintessentially American traditions of all is the State Fair. New Englander Elkanah Watson is credited with creating the first agricultural fair in the U.S.: the Pittsfield, Massachusetts Cattle Show in 1811, which exhibited animals and awarded prize money to the best oxen, cattle, swine, and sheep. In the next few years, county fairs popped up throughout New England, and by 1841, the country had its first state fair, in Syracuse, New York, designed to show off New York’s agricultural prowess with livestock and giant-vegetable competitions.

Location: Pelham, AL
In operation since: 1947
Standout events: Alabama might be the only fair with more events in the modeling and talent competitions than livestock competitions. They’re serious, too: Aspiring models ages 4 to 28 are judged on runway, jeans, and swimwear, and those past age 15 must meet height requirements. Winners get photo shoots and meetings with agents—a big step up from the ribbons sheep and horse show winners get. 

Location: Palmer, AK
In operation since: 1936
Standout events: Let’s face it, you’re probably not going to Alaska for the state fair. But if you happen to be in town, you can witness a peculiarly Alaskan pastime—giant cabbage growing. Alaska’s farmers seem to have a knack for growing steroidal vegetables. The most recent world record, in 2012, went to Scott Rabb and his 138 pound cabbage (above).

The STS is open to high school seniors in the United States and territories, and American students attending school abroad. Each year, nearly 2,000 students accept the challenge of completing an entry for the STS, with finalists competing for the top prize — a $100,000 scholarship. The Intel Science Talent Search School Award recognizes excellence in teaching and school support of individual student research. Each school will receive an award of $1,000 for each semifinalist named. For complete details and procedures for submitting entries, please check the Society for Science and the Public website.

This scholarship competition encourages students to get involved in science, engineering, technology or mathematics related research. The symposia give students an opportunity to present their original research findings in front of a judging panel and their peers. In addition, participation in the regional or national symposia offer a number of experiences for students including workshops, panel discussions, career exploration, research lab visits and networking events. For more details, visit the Junior Science and Humanities Symposium website.

This competition asks high school students to identify and help offer sustainable, replicable solutions for environmental issues that have a global impact. Chosen environmental issues can fall into one or more of the challenge topic areas — energy, biodiversity, land management, water conservation and clean-up, and/or air and climate. Students are asked to conduct thorough scientific research to identify an environmental problem, hypothesize a solution, and study its success and ability to be replicated on a global scale. For more details, visit the Siemens We Can Change the World Competition website.

Getting children to read is one of the primary goals of schools, community education organizations, and parent groups, and one of the most popular ways of doing that is the book fair. Though schools do raise money through book fairs, most event coordinators and booksellers agree that the main goal is literacy. “Putting books into kids’ hands—not fundraising—is still the primary motivation for book fairs. There’s a lot of focus on making sure that children are reading,” says Alan Boyko, vice president of product development for Scholastic Inc. , which provides book fairs to about 50,000 schools nationwide.

But running a book fair that will get kids excited about reading takes more than setting a date and contacting your local or national bookseller. According to the experts, you need to organize, publicize, merchandise—and don’t forget to make it fun.

The first step to book fair success is planning ahead and marshalling enough volunteers. “Start early and have a plan,” says Diane Trovato, who runs book fairs in the Boston area under the name Books, Books, Books. She recommends working with teachers, librarians, or reading specialists to coordinate book selections to curriculum and a chosen theme, as well as to student interests and reading levels.

One of the most quintessentially American traditions of all is the State Fair. New Englander Elkanah Watson is credited with creating the first agricultural fair in the U.S.: the Pittsfield, Massachusetts Cattle Show in 1811, which exhibited animals and awarded prize money to the best oxen, cattle, swine, and sheep. In the next few years, county fairs popped up throughout New England, and by 1841, the country had its first state fair, in Syracuse, New York, designed to show off New York’s agricultural prowess with livestock and giant-vegetable competitions.

Location: Pelham, AL
In operation since: 1947
Standout events: Alabama might be the only fair with more events in the modeling and talent competitions than livestock competitions. They’re serious, too: Aspiring models ages 4 to 28 are judged on runway, jeans, and swimwear, and those past age 15 must meet height requirements. Winners get photo shoots and meetings with agents—a big step up from the ribbons sheep and horse show winners get. 

Location: Palmer, AK
In operation since: 1936
Standout events: Let’s face it, you’re probably not going to Alaska for the state fair. But if you happen to be in town, you can witness a peculiarly Alaskan pastime—giant cabbage growing. Alaska’s farmers seem to have a knack for growing steroidal vegetables. The most recent world record, in 2012, went to Scott Rabb and his 138 pound cabbage (above).

Getting children to read is one of the primary goals of schools, community education organizations, and parent groups, and one of the most popular ways of doing that is the book fair. Though schools do raise money through book fairs, most event coordinators and booksellers agree that the main goal is literacy. “Putting books into kids’ hands—not fundraising—is still the primary motivation for book fairs. There’s a lot of focus on making sure that children are reading,” says Alan Boyko, vice president of product development for Scholastic Inc. , which provides book fairs to about 50,000 schools nationwide.

But running a book fair that will get kids excited about reading takes more than setting a date and contacting your local or national bookseller. According to the experts, you need to organize, publicize, merchandise—and don’t forget to make it fun.

The first step to book fair success is planning ahead and marshalling enough volunteers. “Start early and have a plan,” says Diane Trovato, who runs book fairs in the Boston area under the name Books, Books, Books. She recommends working with teachers, librarians, or reading specialists to coordinate book selections to curriculum and a chosen theme, as well as to student interests and reading levels.

A prize essay on fairs : Dodge, Allen W. (Allen Washington.


Prize Essay on Fairs (Classic Reprint) (Paperback)

Posted by 2018 article

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