There's a big difference between science and science fiction, but there's abundant evidence to suggest that sci-fi books and movies can spark a lifelong interest in science.

"The best of the science fiction films will stimulate a curiosity and an interest in a topic," astrophysicist Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, director of New York's Hayden Planetarium, told Vanity Fair in a recent interview.

Recently, HuffPost Science reached out to top scientists to ask which science fiction movies and classics were their favorites. Keep reading to see their sometimes surprising picks (including Tyson's):

There's a big difference between science and science fiction, but there's abundant evidence to suggest that sci-fi books and movies can spark a lifelong interest in science.

"The best of the science fiction films will stimulate a curiosity and an interest in a topic," astrophysicist Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson, director of New York's Hayden Planetarium, told Vanity Fair in a recent interview.

Recently, HuffPost Science reached out to top scientists to ask which science fiction movies and classics were their favorites. Keep reading to see their sometimes surprising picks (including Tyson's):

“A Martian Odyssey” is a 1934 science fiction novelette by Stanley G. Weinbaum. It is about an astronaut who walks several hundred miles across the Martian landscape, and the amazing life forms he encounters.

“That’s right,” agreed Jarvis. “I didn’t know what, so I sneaked over to find out. There was a racket like a flock of crows eating a bunch of canaries–whistles, cackles, caws, trills, and what have you. I rounded a clump of stumps, and there was Tweel!”

“That freak ostrich,” explained the narrator. “At least, Tweel is as near as I can pronounce it without sputtering. He called it something like ‘Trrrweerrlll.'”

A Martian Odyssey - Project Gutenberg Australia


A Martian Odyssey by Stanley G. Weinbaum - Goodreads

Posted by 2018 article

51BcEcj9fxL