Chocolate is a complex thing—its history, properties, lore, chemistry and uses fill volumes and volumes of books. I'm always looking to expand my knowledge, and thought I'd share some of my favorite chocolate-related tomes this week. Since my space here is limited, this is by no means a comprehensive or scientifically compiled list. Please jump in and add your favorites! I'm always looking for new reading material.

The True History of Chocolate by Sophie D. Coe and Michael D. Coe: Exhaustively researched yet readable and entertaining. This book's authors are both anthropologists, so you get a lot of understanding of the significance of chocolate in Mayan and Aztec culture, followed by a thorough history of the evolution of chocolate. I picked up this book on a whim and was surprised by how absorbing it is (it helps if you're really into chocolate, of course). Bonus: it's full of interesting little informational tidbits and anecdotes that might come in handy at your next cocktail party.

The Great Book of Chocolate by David Lebovitz: The former pastry chef at Chez Panisse has a serious thing for chocolate, and it comes through in this slim but thorough and highly entertaining volume. With information on how chocolate is made, terminology, buying, storage, notable American and European chocolatiers, and some recipes thrown in for good measure, this book has a little bit of everything. Lebovitz's humor and obvious love for the subject matter really make it shine.

The Big Block of Chocolate is a wonderful book to use for shared reading. Its repetitive text, rhyme and rhythm easily get children reading along with the story. The students like the rhythm and rhyme of the text. They also like the surprises in the story.

Materials

  • The Big Block of Chocolate by Janet Slater Redhead
Set Up and Prepare The Big Block of Chocolate works well for a lead into a discussion on whether treats should be shared or hidden.

Have a chocolate bar as a prop for the story. Encourage the students to read aloud with the repetitive parts of the story.
 

Chocolate is a complex thing—its history, properties, lore, chemistry and uses fill volumes and volumes of books. I'm always looking to expand my knowledge, and thought I'd share some of my favorite chocolate-related tomes this week. Since my space here is limited, this is by no means a comprehensive or scientifically compiled list. Please jump in and add your favorites! I'm always looking for new reading material.

The True History of Chocolate by Sophie D. Coe and Michael D. Coe: Exhaustively researched yet readable and entertaining. This book's authors are both anthropologists, so you get a lot of understanding of the significance of chocolate in Mayan and Aztec culture, followed by a thorough history of the evolution of chocolate. I picked up this book on a whim and was surprised by how absorbing it is (it helps if you're really into chocolate, of course). Bonus: it's full of interesting little informational tidbits and anecdotes that might come in handy at your next cocktail party.

The Great Book of Chocolate by David Lebovitz: The former pastry chef at Chez Panisse has a serious thing for chocolate, and it comes through in this slim but thorough and highly entertaining volume. With information on how chocolate is made, terminology, buying, storage, notable American and European chocolatiers, and some recipes thrown in for good measure, this book has a little bit of everything. Lebovitz's humor and obvious love for the subject matter really make it shine.

Chocolate is a complex thing—its history, properties, lore, chemistry and uses fill volumes and volumes of books. I'm always looking to expand my knowledge, and thought I'd share some of my favorite chocolate-related tomes this week. Since my space here is limited, this is by no means a comprehensive or scientifically compiled list. Please jump in and add your favorites! I'm always looking for new reading material.

The True History of Chocolate by Sophie D. Coe and Michael D. Coe: Exhaustively researched yet readable and entertaining. This book's authors are both anthropologists, so you get a lot of understanding of the significance of chocolate in Mayan and Aztec culture, followed by a thorough history of the evolution of chocolate. I picked up this book on a whim and was surprised by how absorbing it is (it helps if you're really into chocolate, of course). Bonus: it's full of interesting little informational tidbits and anecdotes that might come in handy at your next cocktail party.

The Great Book of Chocolate by David Lebovitz: The former pastry chef at Chez Panisse has a serious thing for chocolate, and it comes through in this slim but thorough and highly entertaining volume. With information on how chocolate is made, terminology, buying, storage, notable American and European chocolatiers, and some recipes thrown in for good measure, this book has a little bit of everything. Lebovitz's humor and obvious love for the subject matter really make it shine.

The Big Block of Chocolate is a wonderful book to use for shared reading. Its repetitive text, rhyme and rhythm easily get children reading along with the story. The students like the rhythm and rhyme of the text. They also like the surprises in the story.

Materials

  • The Big Block of Chocolate by Janet Slater Redhead
Set Up and Prepare The Big Block of Chocolate works well for a lead into a discussion on whether treats should be shared or hidden.

Have a chocolate bar as a prop for the story. Encourage the students to read aloud with the repetitive parts of the story.
 

C hocolate is a key ingredient in many foods such as milk shakes, candy bars, cookies and cereals. It is ranked as one of the most favourite flavours in North America and Europe (Swift, 1998). Despite its popularity, most people do not know the unique origins of this popular treat. Chocolate is a product that requires complex procedures to produce. The process involves harvesting coca, refining coca to cocoa beans, and shipping the cocoa beans to the manufacturing factory for cleaning, coaching and grinding. These cocoa beans will then be imported or exported to other countries and be transformed into different type of chocolate products (Allen, 1994).

Top seven cocoa producing countries ICCO forecasts of production of cocoa beans for the 1997/98 cocoa year Country
Production forecast for 1997/98:
(in thousand tonnes)
Côte d'Ivoire
1150.0
Ghana
370.0
Indonesia
310.0
Brazil
160.0
Nigeria
155.0
Cameroon
125.0
Malaysia
100.0
Reference:
Quarterly Bulletin of Cocoa Statistics, 24 (1), 1997/98
Source: International Cocoa organization, April 1998

Chocolate production starts with harvesting coca in a forest. Cocoa comes from tropical evergreen Cocoa trees, such as Theobroma Cocoa, which grow in the wet lowland tropics of Central and South America, West Africa and Southeast Asia (within 20 C of the equator) (Walter,1981) . Cocoa needs to be harvested manually in the forest. The seed pods of coca will first be collected; the beans will be selected and placed in piles. These cocoa beans will then be ready to be shipped to the manufacturer for mass production.

5 Great Books About Chocolate | Serious Eats


The Great Book of Chocolate: David Lebovitz. - amazon.com

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