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The Last Victim: A True-Life Journey into the Mind of the Serial Killer (1999) is a non-fiction work by author Jason Moss in which he details his fascination and subsequent correspondence with several notorious American serial killers .

In 1994, Moss was an 18-year-old college student at UNLV. While studying for his honors thesis, he established relationships by correspondence with John Wayne Gacy , Richard Ramirez , Henry Lee Lucas , Jeffrey Dahmer , and Charles Manson . He obtained samples of correspondence from and interviews with these men. Moss researched what would most interest each subject, and cast himself in the role of disciple, admirer, surrogate, or potential victim.

In his book Moss said that he had been interested in a career with the FBI . He thought that gaining the trust of a serial killer, possibly learning more about their stated crimes or unsolved murders, was a way to distinguish himself as a job candidate. [1]

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The Last Victim: A True-Life Journey into the Mind of the Serial Killer (1999) is a non-fiction work by author Jason Moss in which he details his fascination and subsequent correspondence with several notorious American serial killers .

In 1994, Moss was an 18-year-old college student at UNLV. While studying for his honors thesis, he established relationships by correspondence with John Wayne Gacy , Richard Ramirez , Henry Lee Lucas , Jeffrey Dahmer , and Charles Manson . He obtained samples of correspondence from and interviews with these men. Moss researched what would most interest each subject, and cast himself in the role of disciple, admirer, surrogate, or potential victim.

In his book Moss said that he had been interested in a career with the FBI . He thought that gaining the trust of a serial killer, possibly learning more about their stated crimes or unsolved murders, was a way to distinguish himself as a job candidate. [1]

According to those who had gazed the deepest into his murderous soul, Jeffrey Dahmer had long been ready to die. “I always asked if he was safe,” his mother, Joyce Flint, who spoke on the telephone with her son every Sunday night, told a Milwaukee newspaper. “He’d say, ‘It doesn’t matter, Mom. I don’t care if something happens to me.’ ”

For some of the relatives of his victims, the answer is a defiant yes. “I’m happy and very excited that the monster is finally dead,” said Janie Hagen, whose brother Richard Guerrero was slaughtered by Dahmer in 1988 at the age of 21. “The Devil is gone.” But for others, killing is killing, no matter how vile the victim. “I couldn’t stop crying when I heard the news,” says Theresa Smith, who had visited Dahmer in prison this past March to learn just how her brother Eddie, slain by Dahmer in 1990 at age 28, had died. “I was crying for his parents. For him, because he was murdered. He shouldn’t have been murdered like that.”

Still, in death, as in life, the name Jeffrey Dahmer may always evoke those searing images that riveted the nation in the summer of 1991: the freezers and lobster-cooking pot full of human body parts being removed from Apartment 213 in the building on Milwaukee’s North 25th St., Dahmer’s own pale, affectless face and flat stare, and especially the faces of his young victims. “He was like Halley’s comet,” says his former lawyer, Gerald Boyle, who mounted an unsuccessful insanity defense. “A criminal like him comes around every 75 years and, thankfully, isn’t seen again for another 75.”

You're currently on {{currently_on}}. However, it looks like you listened to {{listened_to}} on {{device_name}} {{time}}.

You're currently on {{currently_on}}. However, it looks like you listened to {{listened_to}} on {{device_name}} {{time}}.

The Last Victim: A True-Life Journey into the Mind of the Serial Killer (1999) is a non-fiction work by author Jason Moss in which he details his fascination and subsequent correspondence with several notorious American serial killers .

In 1994, Moss was an 18-year-old college student at UNLV. While studying for his honors thesis, he established relationships by correspondence with John Wayne Gacy , Richard Ramirez , Henry Lee Lucas , Jeffrey Dahmer , and Charles Manson . He obtained samples of correspondence from and interviews with these men. Moss researched what would most interest each subject, and cast himself in the role of disciple, admirer, surrogate, or potential victim.

In his book Moss said that he had been interested in a career with the FBI . He thought that gaining the trust of a serial killer, possibly learning more about their stated crimes or unsolved murders, was a way to distinguish himself as a job candidate. [1]

According to those who had gazed the deepest into his murderous soul, Jeffrey Dahmer had long been ready to die. “I always asked if he was safe,” his mother, Joyce Flint, who spoke on the telephone with her son every Sunday night, told a Milwaukee newspaper. “He’d say, ‘It doesn’t matter, Mom. I don’t care if something happens to me.’ ”

For some of the relatives of his victims, the answer is a defiant yes. “I’m happy and very excited that the monster is finally dead,” said Janie Hagen, whose brother Richard Guerrero was slaughtered by Dahmer in 1988 at the age of 21. “The Devil is gone.” But for others, killing is killing, no matter how vile the victim. “I couldn’t stop crying when I heard the news,” says Theresa Smith, who had visited Dahmer in prison this past March to learn just how her brother Eddie, slain by Dahmer in 1990 at age 28, had died. “I was crying for his parents. For him, because he was murdered. He shouldn’t have been murdered like that.”

Still, in death, as in life, the name Jeffrey Dahmer may always evoke those searing images that riveted the nation in the summer of 1991: the freezers and lobster-cooking pot full of human body parts being removed from Apartment 213 in the building on Milwaukee’s North 25th St., Dahmer’s own pale, affectless face and flat stare, and especially the faces of his young victims. “He was like Halley’s comet,” says his former lawyer, Gerald Boyle, who mounted an unsuccessful insanity defense. “A criminal like him comes around every 75 years and, thankfully, isn’t seen again for another 75.”

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Posted by 2018 article

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