Charles Monroe "Sparky" Schulz's Peanuts comic strip was like none before it. The children-filled frames took the world by storm, fulfilling Sparky Schulz's childhood dreams. Though he was "a barber's son brimming with insecurity, depression, loss, and resentment" (Lorberer), Schulz was able to take a kid, a dog, and some ragamuffin friends and turn them into an historic franchise – one literally for the record books. For Schulz, the success was no surprise: "Well, frankly, I guess I did expect Peanuts would be successful, because after all, it was something I had planned for since I was six years old" (Larkin and Schulz 6).

Schulz and his body of work have made history. According to Keiller, "at the peak of Schulz's popularity, Peanuts captured three hundred and fifty-five million readers, and the merchandising of the brand created a franchise unlike any of the funny papers had ever known, with the cartoonist himself earning from $30 million to $40 million a year" (Schulz Complete Peanuts 301). Keiller continues:

Regardless of the success of the comic strip, the sacred reader reads Peanuts through a set of data that seems to reflect Schulz's intentions. Schulz was from a Christian family, studied the Bible, was active in the church, and even taught Sunday School. Therefore, if there are elements in Peanuts that appear to create a moral universe and express a religious truth, then the sacred reader believes that meaning was intended. This intended meaning is of great importance as it connects to 'God and beyond', and therefore forms the backbone for the sacred reader's interpretation of Peanuts , as opposed to circulation figures or profit margins.

Join to find the hottest teen books, connect with your favorite YA authors and meet new friends who share your reading interests. Visit

Read new romance book reviews, posts from your
favorite authors, samples, exciting digital first publications
and e-book specials. Visit AvonRomance.com »

Visit the official Harlequin book site.
See the newest novels, discuss with other book lovers,
buy romance books online. Visit Harlequin.com »

Charles Monroe "Sparky" Schulz's Peanuts comic strip was like none before it. The children-filled frames took the world by storm, fulfilling Sparky Schulz's childhood dreams. Though he was "a barber's son brimming with insecurity, depression, loss, and resentment" (Lorberer), Schulz was able to take a kid, a dog, and some ragamuffin friends and turn them into an historic franchise – one literally for the record books. For Schulz, the success was no surprise: "Well, frankly, I guess I did expect Peanuts would be successful, because after all, it was something I had planned for since I was six years old" (Larkin and Schulz 6).

Schulz and his body of work have made history. According to Keiller, "at the peak of Schulz's popularity, Peanuts captured three hundred and fifty-five million readers, and the merchandising of the brand created a franchise unlike any of the funny papers had ever known, with the cartoonist himself earning from $30 million to $40 million a year" (Schulz Complete Peanuts 301). Keiller continues:

Regardless of the success of the comic strip, the sacred reader reads Peanuts through a set of data that seems to reflect Schulz's intentions. Schulz was from a Christian family, studied the Bible, was active in the church, and even taught Sunday School. Therefore, if there are elements in Peanuts that appear to create a moral universe and express a religious truth, then the sacred reader believes that meaning was intended. This intended meaning is of great importance as it connects to 'God and beyond', and therefore forms the backbone for the sacred reader's interpretation of Peanuts , as opposed to circulation figures or profit margins.

The Parables of Peanuts by Robert L. Short - Goodreads


The Parables of Peanuts - Robert L. Short - Google Books

Posted by 2018 article

514bzS+IPsL