1. He was named after a famous ancestor.
Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald was born in St. Paul Minnesota on September 24, 1896. He was named for Francis Scott Key, the lawyer and writer who penned the lyrics to “The Star Spangled Banner” during the War of 1812. The two were only distantly related—Key was a second cousin three times removed—but Fitzgerald was known to play up the family connection. While driving past a statue of Key in an alcoholic haze in 1934, he supposedly hopped from the car and hid in the bushes, yelling to a friend, “Don’t let Frank see me drunk!”

3. He narrowly missed out on serving in World War I.
When the United States entered World War I in 1917, Fitzgerald dropped out of Princeton and took a commission as a second lieutenant in the army. Worried he might die in battle, he began frantically writing in his off-hours in the hopes of leaving behind a literary legacy. While he never made it to the battlegrounds of World War I—the November 1918 armistice was signed shortly before he was to be shipped overseas—Fitzgerald did complete a draft of an unpublished novel called “The Romantic Egotist,” which he later reworked into his smash hit debut “This Side of Paradise.”

6. He never lived in the same place for more than a few years.
Despite earning a small fortune as a writer, Fitzgerald never owned a home and spent most of his life living out of rented houses, apartments and high-class hotels. Between 1920 and 1940, he lived variously in New York City, Connecticut, Minnesota, Long Island, Paris, the French Riviera, Rome, Los Angeles, Delaware, Switzerland, Baltimore and North Carolina. Fitzgerald’s itinerant nature was due in part to his attempts to escape his hard-partying lifestyle and find peace and quiet to write, but he also occasionally moved to cities where his mentally ill wife Zelda was being hospitalized.

1. He was named after a famous ancestor.
Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald was born in St. Paul Minnesota on September 24, 1896. He was named for Francis Scott Key, the lawyer and writer who penned the lyrics to “The Star Spangled Banner” during the War of 1812. The two were only distantly related—Key was a second cousin three times removed—but Fitzgerald was known to play up the family connection. While driving past a statue of Key in an alcoholic haze in 1934, he supposedly hopped from the car and hid in the bushes, yelling to a friend, “Don’t let Frank see me drunk!”

3. He narrowly missed out on serving in World War I.
When the United States entered World War I in 1917, Fitzgerald dropped out of Princeton and took a commission as a second lieutenant in the army. Worried he might die in battle, he began frantically writing in his off-hours in the hopes of leaving behind a literary legacy. While he never made it to the battlegrounds of World War I—the November 1918 armistice was signed shortly before he was to be shipped overseas—Fitzgerald did complete a draft of an unpublished novel called “The Romantic Egotist,” which he later reworked into his smash hit debut “This Side of Paradise.”

6. He never lived in the same place for more than a few years.
Despite earning a small fortune as a writer, Fitzgerald never owned a home and spent most of his life living out of rented houses, apartments and high-class hotels. Between 1920 and 1940, he lived variously in New York City, Connecticut, Minnesota, Long Island, Paris, the French Riviera, Rome, Los Angeles, Delaware, Switzerland, Baltimore and North Carolina. Fitzgerald’s itinerant nature was due in part to his attempts to escape his hard-partying lifestyle and find peace and quiet to write, but he also occasionally moved to cities where his mentally ill wife Zelda was being hospitalized.

It has been said by a celebrated person [This was Edna St. Vincent Millay, who met Scott Fitzgerald in Paris in the spring of 1921.] that to meet F. Scott Fitzgerald is to think of a stupid old woman with whom someone has left a diamond; she is extremely proud of the diamond and shows it to everyone who comes by, and everyone is surprised that such an ignorant old woman should possess so valuable a jewel; for in nothing does she appear so inept as in the remarks she makes about the diamond.

It is true that Scott Fitzgerald plays the language entirely by ear. But his instrument, for all that, is no mean one. He has an instinct for graceful and vivid prose that some of his more pretentious fellows might envy.

“F. Scott Fitzgerald.” From The Shores of Light (New York: Vintage Books, 1961). Copyright (c) 1952 by Edmund Wilson. Reprinted by permission of the author.

1. He was named after a famous ancestor.
Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald was born in St. Paul Minnesota on September 24, 1896. He was named for Francis Scott Key, the lawyer and writer who penned the lyrics to “The Star Spangled Banner” during the War of 1812. The two were only distantly related—Key was a second cousin three times removed—but Fitzgerald was known to play up the family connection. While driving past a statue of Key in an alcoholic haze in 1934, he supposedly hopped from the car and hid in the bushes, yelling to a friend, “Don’t let Frank see me drunk!”

3. He narrowly missed out on serving in World War I.
When the United States entered World War I in 1917, Fitzgerald dropped out of Princeton and took a commission as a second lieutenant in the army. Worried he might die in battle, he began frantically writing in his off-hours in the hopes of leaving behind a literary legacy. While he never made it to the battlegrounds of World War I—the November 1918 armistice was signed shortly before he was to be shipped overseas—Fitzgerald did complete a draft of an unpublished novel called “The Romantic Egotist,” which he later reworked into his smash hit debut “This Side of Paradise.”

6. He never lived in the same place for more than a few years.
Despite earning a small fortune as a writer, Fitzgerald never owned a home and spent most of his life living out of rented houses, apartments and high-class hotels. Between 1920 and 1940, he lived variously in New York City, Connecticut, Minnesota, Long Island, Paris, the French Riviera, Rome, Los Angeles, Delaware, Switzerland, Baltimore and North Carolina. Fitzgerald’s itinerant nature was due in part to his attempts to escape his hard-partying lifestyle and find peace and quiet to write, but he also occasionally moved to cities where his mentally ill wife Zelda was being hospitalized.

It has been said by a celebrated person [This was Edna St. Vincent Millay, who met Scott Fitzgerald in Paris in the spring of 1921.] that to meet F. Scott Fitzgerald is to think of a stupid old woman with whom someone has left a diamond; she is extremely proud of the diamond and shows it to everyone who comes by, and everyone is surprised that such an ignorant old woman should possess so valuable a jewel; for in nothing does she appear so inept as in the remarks she makes about the diamond.

It is true that Scott Fitzgerald plays the language entirely by ear. But his instrument, for all that, is no mean one. He has an instinct for graceful and vivid prose that some of his more pretentious fellows might envy.

“F. Scott Fitzgerald.” From The Shores of Light (New York: Vintage Books, 1961). Copyright (c) 1952 by Edmund Wilson. Reprinted by permission of the author.

Zelda Fitzgerald ( / ˈ z ɛ l d ə f ɪ t s ˈ dʒ ɛ r ə l d / , née Sayre ; July 24, 1900 – March 10, 1948) was an American socialite, novelist, painter and wife of author F. Scott Fitzgerald .

A 1970 biography by Nancy Milford was on the short list of contenders for the Pulitzer Prize . In 1992, Zelda was inducted into the Alabama Women's Hall of Fame . Her life was dramatized in the 2017 TV series Z: The Beginning of Everything .

Born in Montgomery, Alabama , Zelda Sayre was the youngest of six children. Her mother, Minerva Buckner "Minnie" Machen (November 23, 1860 – January 13, 1958), named her after characters in two little-known stories: Jane Howard's "Zelda: A Tale of the Massachusetts Colony" (1866) and Robert Edward Francillon's "Zelda's Fortune" (1874). A spoiled child, Zelda was doted upon by her mother, but her father, Anthony Dickinson Sayre (1858–1931) [1] —a justice of the Supreme Court of Alabama and one of Alabama's leading jurists—was a strict and remote man.

CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams.

F. Scott Fitzgerald , in full Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald , (born September 24, 1896, St. Paul, Minnesota, U.S.—died December 21, 1940, Hollywood, California), American short-story writer and novelist famous for his depictions of the Jazz Age (the 1920s), his most brilliant novel being The Great Gatsby (1925). His private life, with his wife, Zelda , in both America and France, became almost as celebrated as his novels.

Fitzgerald was the only son of an unsuccessful, aristocratic father and an energetic, provincial mother. Half the time he thought of himself as the heir of his father’s tradition, which included the author of “The Star-Spangled Banner,” Francis Scott Key , after whom he was named, and half the time as “straight 1850 potato-famine Irish.” As a result he had typically ambivalent American feelings about American life, which seemed to him at once vulgar and dazzlingly promising.

He returned to Princeton the next fall, but he had now lost all the positions he coveted, and in November 1917 he left to join the army. In July 1918, while he was stationed near Montgomery, Alabama, he met Zelda Sayre , the daughter of an Alabama Supreme Court judge. They fell deeply in love, and, as soon as he could, Fitzgerald headed for New York determined to achieve instant success and to marry Zelda. What he achieved was an advertising job at $90 a month. Zelda broke their engagement, and, after an epic drunk, Fitzgerald retired to St. Paul to rewrite for the second time a novel he had begun at Princeton. In the spring of 1920 it was published, he married Zelda, and

1. He was named after a famous ancestor.
Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald was born in St. Paul Minnesota on September 24, 1896. He was named for Francis Scott Key, the lawyer and writer who penned the lyrics to “The Star Spangled Banner” during the War of 1812. The two were only distantly related—Key was a second cousin three times removed—but Fitzgerald was known to play up the family connection. While driving past a statue of Key in an alcoholic haze in 1934, he supposedly hopped from the car and hid in the bushes, yelling to a friend, “Don’t let Frank see me drunk!”

3. He narrowly missed out on serving in World War I.
When the United States entered World War I in 1917, Fitzgerald dropped out of Princeton and took a commission as a second lieutenant in the army. Worried he might die in battle, he began frantically writing in his off-hours in the hopes of leaving behind a literary legacy. While he never made it to the battlegrounds of World War I—the November 1918 armistice was signed shortly before he was to be shipped overseas—Fitzgerald did complete a draft of an unpublished novel called “The Romantic Egotist,” which he later reworked into his smash hit debut “This Side of Paradise.”

6. He never lived in the same place for more than a few years.
Despite earning a small fortune as a writer, Fitzgerald never owned a home and spent most of his life living out of rented houses, apartments and high-class hotels. Between 1920 and 1940, he lived variously in New York City, Connecticut, Minnesota, Long Island, Paris, the French Riviera, Rome, Los Angeles, Delaware, Switzerland, Baltimore and North Carolina. Fitzgerald’s itinerant nature was due in part to his attempts to escape his hard-partying lifestyle and find peace and quiet to write, but he also occasionally moved to cities where his mentally ill wife Zelda was being hospitalized.

It has been said by a celebrated person [This was Edna St. Vincent Millay, who met Scott Fitzgerald in Paris in the spring of 1921.] that to meet F. Scott Fitzgerald is to think of a stupid old woman with whom someone has left a diamond; she is extremely proud of the diamond and shows it to everyone who comes by, and everyone is surprised that such an ignorant old woman should possess so valuable a jewel; for in nothing does she appear so inept as in the remarks she makes about the diamond.

It is true that Scott Fitzgerald plays the language entirely by ear. But his instrument, for all that, is no mean one. He has an instinct for graceful and vivid prose that some of his more pretentious fellows might envy.

“F. Scott Fitzgerald.” From The Shores of Light (New York: Vintage Books, 1961). Copyright (c) 1952 by Edmund Wilson. Reprinted by permission of the author.

Zelda Fitzgerald ( / ˈ z ɛ l d ə f ɪ t s ˈ dʒ ɛ r ə l d / , née Sayre ; July 24, 1900 – March 10, 1948) was an American socialite, novelist, painter and wife of author F. Scott Fitzgerald .

A 1970 biography by Nancy Milford was on the short list of contenders for the Pulitzer Prize . In 1992, Zelda was inducted into the Alabama Women's Hall of Fame . Her life was dramatized in the 2017 TV series Z: The Beginning of Everything .

Born in Montgomery, Alabama , Zelda Sayre was the youngest of six children. Her mother, Minerva Buckner "Minnie" Machen (November 23, 1860 – January 13, 1958), named her after characters in two little-known stories: Jane Howard's "Zelda: A Tale of the Massachusetts Colony" (1866) and Robert Edward Francillon's "Zelda's Fortune" (1874). A spoiled child, Zelda was doted upon by her mother, but her father, Anthony Dickinson Sayre (1858–1931) [1] —a justice of the Supreme Court of Alabama and one of Alabama's leading jurists—was a strict and remote man.

1. He was named after a famous ancestor.
Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald was born in St. Paul Minnesota on September 24, 1896. He was named for Francis Scott Key, the lawyer and writer who penned the lyrics to “The Star Spangled Banner” during the War of 1812. The two were only distantly related—Key was a second cousin three times removed—but Fitzgerald was known to play up the family connection. While driving past a statue of Key in an alcoholic haze in 1934, he supposedly hopped from the car and hid in the bushes, yelling to a friend, “Don’t let Frank see me drunk!”

3. He narrowly missed out on serving in World War I.
When the United States entered World War I in 1917, Fitzgerald dropped out of Princeton and took a commission as a second lieutenant in the army. Worried he might die in battle, he began frantically writing in his off-hours in the hopes of leaving behind a literary legacy. While he never made it to the battlegrounds of World War I—the November 1918 armistice was signed shortly before he was to be shipped overseas—Fitzgerald did complete a draft of an unpublished novel called “The Romantic Egotist,” which he later reworked into his smash hit debut “This Side of Paradise.”

6. He never lived in the same place for more than a few years.
Despite earning a small fortune as a writer, Fitzgerald never owned a home and spent most of his life living out of rented houses, apartments and high-class hotels. Between 1920 and 1940, he lived variously in New York City, Connecticut, Minnesota, Long Island, Paris, the French Riviera, Rome, Los Angeles, Delaware, Switzerland, Baltimore and North Carolina. Fitzgerald’s itinerant nature was due in part to his attempts to escape his hard-partying lifestyle and find peace and quiet to write, but he also occasionally moved to cities where his mentally ill wife Zelda was being hospitalized.

It has been said by a celebrated person [This was Edna St. Vincent Millay, who met Scott Fitzgerald in Paris in the spring of 1921.] that to meet F. Scott Fitzgerald is to think of a stupid old woman with whom someone has left a diamond; she is extremely proud of the diamond and shows it to everyone who comes by, and everyone is surprised that such an ignorant old woman should possess so valuable a jewel; for in nothing does she appear so inept as in the remarks she makes about the diamond.

It is true that Scott Fitzgerald plays the language entirely by ear. But his instrument, for all that, is no mean one. He has an instinct for graceful and vivid prose that some of his more pretentious fellows might envy.

“F. Scott Fitzgerald.” From The Shores of Light (New York: Vintage Books, 1961). Copyright (c) 1952 by Edmund Wilson. Reprinted by permission of the author.

Zelda Fitzgerald ( / ˈ z ɛ l d ə f ɪ t s ˈ dʒ ɛ r ə l d / , née Sayre ; July 24, 1900 – March 10, 1948) was an American socialite, novelist, painter and wife of author F. Scott Fitzgerald .

A 1970 biography by Nancy Milford was on the short list of contenders for the Pulitzer Prize . In 1992, Zelda was inducted into the Alabama Women's Hall of Fame . Her life was dramatized in the 2017 TV series Z: The Beginning of Everything .

Born in Montgomery, Alabama , Zelda Sayre was the youngest of six children. Her mother, Minerva Buckner "Minnie" Machen (November 23, 1860 – January 13, 1958), named her after characters in two little-known stories: Jane Howard's "Zelda: A Tale of the Massachusetts Colony" (1866) and Robert Edward Francillon's "Zelda's Fortune" (1874). A spoiled child, Zelda was doted upon by her mother, but her father, Anthony Dickinson Sayre (1858–1931) [1] —a justice of the Supreme Court of Alabama and one of Alabama's leading jurists—was a strict and remote man.

CliffsNotes study guides are written by real teachers and professors, so no matter what you're studying, CliffsNotes can ease your homework headaches and help you score high on exams.

F. Scott Fitzgerald - IMDb


F. Scott Fitzgerald Biography - Biography.com

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