The blitzkrieg, which is German for "lightning war," was an effective German strategy in World War II because it took full advantage of the new ideas of mechanized warfare with bombers, fighter planes and tanks to soften up the enemy and create terror before sending in infantry troops. This caught many countries off guard because they were accustomed to the more traditional tactics used in World War I.

Dive bombers, specifically the Stuka, would rapidly approach a target and unload their munitions. In the chaos of the explosions, Panzer tanks would roll through the enemy's defensive line and fire at targets of importance. Finally, the infantry soldiers would come in to pick off stragglers.

Germany used mechanized forces in a way that had not yet occurred to other countries, some of whom were still thinking in terms of static battle lines as used in World War I, or in the case of England, had not yet realized the importance of air power. Mechanized warfare allows the offense of a combatant to maneuver more quickly through terrain and bring the heaviest force to bear from the outset of an assault as opposed to sending fighting personnel into a fresh battlefield. The blitzkrieg's overall effectiveness only lasted for a few months to a year because the Allies caught onto Germany's tactics and adapted.

The blitzkrieg, which is German for "lightning war," was an effective German strategy in World War II because it took full advantage of the new ideas of mechanized warfare with bombers, fighter planes and tanks to soften up the enemy and create terror before sending in infantry troops. This caught many countries off guard because they were accustomed to the more traditional tactics used in World War I.

Dive bombers, specifically the Stuka, would rapidly approach a target and unload their munitions. In the chaos of the explosions, Panzer tanks would roll through the enemy's defensive line and fire at targets of importance. Finally, the infantry soldiers would come in to pick off stragglers.

Germany used mechanized forces in a way that had not yet occurred to other countries, some of whom were still thinking in terms of static battle lines as used in World War I, or in the case of England, had not yet realized the importance of air power. Mechanized warfare allows the offense of a combatant to maneuver more quickly through terrain and bring the heaviest force to bear from the outset of an assault as opposed to sending fighting personnel into a fresh battlefield. The blitzkrieg's overall effectiveness only lasted for a few months to a year because the Allies caught onto Germany's tactics and adapted.

Blitzkrieg , (German: “lightning war”) military tactic calculated to create psychological shock and resultant disorganization in enemy forces through the employment of surprise, speed, and superiority in matériel or firepower. Blitzkrieg is most commonly associated with Nazi Germany during World War II even though numerous combatants used its techniques in that war. Its origins, however, can be traced to the 19th century, and elements of blitzkrieg have been used in present-day conflicts.

Once the strategic Schwerpunkt had been identified, the attack could commence, using the concept of Kesselschlacht (“cauldron battle”). A frontal attack would immobilize the enemy while forces on the flanks would execute a double envelopment, forming a pocket called a Kessel (“cauldron”) around the enemy. Once surrounded, the opposing army, demoralized and with no chance of escape, would face the choice of annihilation or surrender.

Blitzkrieg tactics were used in the successful German invasions of Belgium, the Netherlands, and France in 1940, which saw audacious applications of air power and airborne infantry to overcome fixed fortifications that were believed by the defenders to be impregnable. The Kesselschlacht campaigns on the Eastern Front were staggering in scale, with Kessels that covered vast swathes of territory, enveloping hundreds of thousands of troops. Blitzkrieg tactics were also used by the German commander Erwin Rommel during the desert campaigns in North Africa .

This picture of Heinrich Himmler with Waffen-SS officers was taken in 1940, shortly after the German Blitzkrieg rolled over the tiny Duchy of Luxembourg (the entire country being roughly 50 miles × 35 miles in size). The capital city fell within … Continue reading →

In Saumur, there’s a marvellous tank museum—le Musee des Blindes, as it’s called in French—and I was there not so long ago. The tanks date from World War I up to modern times. There’s a WWII Panther and a King … Continue reading →

Bohuslav Kimlicka flew with the Czech air force, defending his country from the Nazi invasion of 1938. Afterwards, he fought with the French, attempting to stem the 1940 German Blitzkrieg , and then with the Royal Air Force. His descendants … Continue reading →

The blitzkrieg, which is German for "lightning war," was an effective German strategy in World War II because it took full advantage of the new ideas of mechanized warfare with bombers, fighter planes and tanks to soften up the enemy and create terror before sending in infantry troops. This caught many countries off guard because they were accustomed to the more traditional tactics used in World War I.

Dive bombers, specifically the Stuka, would rapidly approach a target and unload their munitions. In the chaos of the explosions, Panzer tanks would roll through the enemy's defensive line and fire at targets of importance. Finally, the infantry soldiers would come in to pick off stragglers.

Germany used mechanized forces in a way that had not yet occurred to other countries, some of whom were still thinking in terms of static battle lines as used in World War I, or in the case of England, had not yet realized the importance of air power. Mechanized warfare allows the offense of a combatant to maneuver more quickly through terrain and bring the heaviest force to bear from the outset of an assault as opposed to sending fighting personnel into a fresh battlefield. The blitzkrieg's overall effectiveness only lasted for a few months to a year because the Allies caught onto Germany's tactics and adapted.

Blitzkrieg , (German: “lightning war”) military tactic calculated to create psychological shock and resultant disorganization in enemy forces through the employment of surprise, speed, and superiority in matériel or firepower. Blitzkrieg is most commonly associated with Nazi Germany during World War II even though numerous combatants used its techniques in that war. Its origins, however, can be traced to the 19th century, and elements of blitzkrieg have been used in present-day conflicts.

Once the strategic Schwerpunkt had been identified, the attack could commence, using the concept of Kesselschlacht (“cauldron battle”). A frontal attack would immobilize the enemy while forces on the flanks would execute a double envelopment, forming a pocket called a Kessel (“cauldron”) around the enemy. Once surrounded, the opposing army, demoralized and with no chance of escape, would face the choice of annihilation or surrender.

Blitzkrieg tactics were used in the successful German invasions of Belgium, the Netherlands, and France in 1940, which saw audacious applications of air power and airborne infantry to overcome fixed fortifications that were believed by the defenders to be impregnable. The Kesselschlacht campaigns on the Eastern Front were staggering in scale, with Kessels that covered vast swathes of territory, enveloping hundreds of thousands of troops. Blitzkrieg tactics were also used by the German commander Erwin Rommel during the desert campaigns in North Africa .

This picture of Heinrich Himmler with Waffen-SS officers was taken in 1940, shortly after the German Blitzkrieg rolled over the tiny Duchy of Luxembourg (the entire country being roughly 50 miles × 35 miles in size). The capital city fell within … Continue reading →

In Saumur, there’s a marvellous tank museum—le Musee des Blindes, as it’s called in French—and I was there not so long ago. The tanks date from World War I up to modern times. There’s a WWII Panther and a King … Continue reading →

Bohuslav Kimlicka flew with the Czech air force, defending his country from the Nazi invasion of 1938. Afterwards, he fought with the French, attempting to stem the 1940 German Blitzkrieg , and then with the Royal Air Force. His descendants … Continue reading →

Magazine with 28 pages and Supplement, pages i-xvi. This first issue has three articles and a supplement, totalling 44 pages.

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The blitzkrieg, which is German for "lightning war," was an effective German strategy in World War II because it took full advantage of the new ideas of mechanized warfare with bombers, fighter planes and tanks to soften up the enemy and create terror before sending in infantry troops. This caught many countries off guard because they were accustomed to the more traditional tactics used in World War I.

Dive bombers, specifically the Stuka, would rapidly approach a target and unload their munitions. In the chaos of the explosions, Panzer tanks would roll through the enemy's defensive line and fire at targets of importance. Finally, the infantry soldiers would come in to pick off stragglers.

Germany used mechanized forces in a way that had not yet occurred to other countries, some of whom were still thinking in terms of static battle lines as used in World War I, or in the case of England, had not yet realized the importance of air power. Mechanized warfare allows the offense of a combatant to maneuver more quickly through terrain and bring the heaviest force to bear from the outset of an assault as opposed to sending fighting personnel into a fresh battlefield. The blitzkrieg's overall effectiveness only lasted for a few months to a year because the Allies caught onto Germany's tactics and adapted.

Blitzkrieg , (German: “lightning war”) military tactic calculated to create psychological shock and resultant disorganization in enemy forces through the employment of surprise, speed, and superiority in matériel or firepower. Blitzkrieg is most commonly associated with Nazi Germany during World War II even though numerous combatants used its techniques in that war. Its origins, however, can be traced to the 19th century, and elements of blitzkrieg have been used in present-day conflicts.

Once the strategic Schwerpunkt had been identified, the attack could commence, using the concept of Kesselschlacht (“cauldron battle”). A frontal attack would immobilize the enemy while forces on the flanks would execute a double envelopment, forming a pocket called a Kessel (“cauldron”) around the enemy. Once surrounded, the opposing army, demoralized and with no chance of escape, would face the choice of annihilation or surrender.

Blitzkrieg tactics were used in the successful German invasions of Belgium, the Netherlands, and France in 1940, which saw audacious applications of air power and airborne infantry to overcome fixed fortifications that were believed by the defenders to be impregnable. The Kesselschlacht campaigns on the Eastern Front were staggering in scale, with Kessels that covered vast swathes of territory, enveloping hundreds of thousands of troops. Blitzkrieg tactics were also used by the German commander Erwin Rommel during the desert campaigns in North Africa .

Blitzkrieg - World War II - HISTORY.com


The Second World War: Blitzkrieg - The Lightning War - YouTube

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