Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America , pledge to the flag of the United States . It was first published in the juvenile periodical The Youth’s Companion on September 8, 1892, in the following form: “I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands; one nation indivisible, with liberty and Justice for all.” The words “the flag of the United States of America” were substituted for “my Flag” in 1924, and the pledge was officially recognized by the U.S. government in 1942. In 1954, at President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s urging, the Congress legislated that “under God” be added, making the pledge read:

I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

A controversy arose concerning the authorship of the pledge of 1892. Claims were made on behalf of both James B. Upham, one of the editors of The Youth’s Companion , and Francis Bellamy, an assistant editor. In 1939 a committee of the U.S. Flag Association ruled in favour of Bellamy, and a detailed report issued by the U.S. Library of Congress in 1957 supported the committee’s ruling.

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America , pledge to the flag of the United States . It was first published in the juvenile periodical The Youth’s Companion on September 8, 1892, in the following form: “I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands; one nation indivisible, with liberty and Justice for all.” The words “the flag of the United States of America” were substituted for “my Flag” in 1924, and the pledge was officially recognized by the U.S. government in 1942. In 1954, at President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s urging, the Congress legislated that “under God” be added, making the pledge read:

I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

A controversy arose concerning the authorship of the pledge of 1892. Claims were made on behalf of both James B. Upham, one of the editors of The Youth’s Companion , and Francis Bellamy, an assistant editor. In 1939 a committee of the U.S. Flag Association ruled in favour of Bellamy, and a detailed report issued by the U.S. Library of Congress in 1957 supported the committee’s ruling.

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

Copyright to the artwork in these Galleries belongs to Geoff Taylor, unless otherwise stated. Please do not use without permission.

A Long Island man with 30 years of teaching experience played himself right out of the classroom this week, after bragging about having failed students over their entirely legal refusal to stand for the Pledge of Allegiance.

In a now-deleted Facebook post published in October on an acquaintance’s page, Uniondale High School teacher Steven Solomon, 58, described flunking two students for sitting during the pledge.

“They refused to stand, saying ‘they didn’t have to[.]’ I told them that is true and that what makes this country great is ‘that I didn’t have to pass them either,’” Solomon explained, noting that each student ended the class with a non-failing 63% average in his class.

Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America , pledge to the flag of the United States . It was first published in the juvenile periodical The Youth’s Companion on September 8, 1892, in the following form: “I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands; one nation indivisible, with liberty and Justice for all.” The words “the flag of the United States of America” were substituted for “my Flag” in 1924, and the pledge was officially recognized by the U.S. government in 1942. In 1954, at President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s urging, the Congress legislated that “under God” be added, making the pledge read:

I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

A controversy arose concerning the authorship of the pledge of 1892. Claims were made on behalf of both James B. Upham, one of the editors of The Youth’s Companion , and Francis Bellamy, an assistant editor. In 1939 a committee of the U.S. Flag Association ruled in favour of Bellamy, and a detailed report issued by the U.S. Library of Congress in 1957 supported the committee’s ruling.

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

Copyright to the artwork in these Galleries belongs to Geoff Taylor, unless otherwise stated. Please do not use without permission.

A Long Island man with 30 years of teaching experience played himself right out of the classroom this week, after bragging about having failed students over their entirely legal refusal to stand for the Pledge of Allegiance.

In a now-deleted Facebook post published in October on an acquaintance’s page, Uniondale High School teacher Steven Solomon, 58, described flunking two students for sitting during the pledge.

“They refused to stand, saying ‘they didn’t have to[.]’ I told them that is true and that what makes this country great is ‘that I didn’t have to pass them either,’” Solomon explained, noting that each student ended the class with a non-failing 63% average in his class.

Вероятно, серверы Твиттера перегружены или в их работе произошел кратковременный сбой. Повторите попытку или посетите страницу Статус Твиттера , чтобы узнать более подробную информацию.

Эта настройка позволяет добавлять в твиты информацию о местоположении, например название города и точные координаты, на веб-сайте и в сторонних приложениях. Вы можете удалить сведения о местоположении из своих твитов в любое время. Подробнее

Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America , pledge to the flag of the United States . It was first published in the juvenile periodical The Youth’s Companion on September 8, 1892, in the following form: “I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands; one nation indivisible, with liberty and Justice for all.” The words “the flag of the United States of America” were substituted for “my Flag” in 1924, and the pledge was officially recognized by the U.S. government in 1942. In 1954, at President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s urging, the Congress legislated that “under God” be added, making the pledge read:

I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

A controversy arose concerning the authorship of the pledge of 1892. Claims were made on behalf of both James B. Upham, one of the editors of The Youth’s Companion , and Francis Bellamy, an assistant editor. In 1939 a committee of the U.S. Flag Association ruled in favour of Bellamy, and a detailed report issued by the U.S. Library of Congress in 1957 supported the committee’s ruling.

All content on this website, including dictionary, thesaurus, literature, geography, and other reference data is for informational purposes only. This information should not be considered complete, up to date, and is not intended to be used in place of a visit, consultation, or advice of a legal, medical, or any other professional.

Copyright to the artwork in these Galleries belongs to Geoff Taylor, unless otherwise stated. Please do not use without permission.

Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America , pledge to the flag of the United States . It was first published in the juvenile periodical The Youth’s Companion on September 8, 1892, in the following form: “I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands; one nation indivisible, with liberty and Justice for all.” The words “the flag of the United States of America” were substituted for “my Flag” in 1924, and the pledge was officially recognized by the U.S. government in 1942. In 1954, at President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s urging, the Congress legislated that “under God” be added, making the pledge read:

I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

A controversy arose concerning the authorship of the pledge of 1892. Claims were made on behalf of both James B. Upham, one of the editors of The Youth’s Companion , and Francis Bellamy, an assistant editor. In 1939 a committee of the U.S. Flag Association ruled in favour of Bellamy, and a detailed report issued by the U.S. Library of Congress in 1957 supported the committee’s ruling.

Allegiance | Definition of Allegiance by Merriam-Webster


Allegiance - Wikipedia

Posted by 2018 article

51RISrOXAKL