The idiom a chip off the old block dates back to the 1600s, though the exact rendering and meaning of the phrase has evolved over time. An idiom is a figure of speech that is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. We will examine the definition of the phrase a chip off the old block , where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences.

A chip off the old block refers to someone who closely resembles his parent either in behavior, looks, interests or character. Most often, the idiom a chip off the old block refers to a son and his father, but not always. The term was originally rendered as a chip of the same block , and was first used in Dr. Sanderson’s Sermon in 1637: “Am not I a child of the same Adam … a chip of the same block, with him?” At this time the phrase referred to any two people who came from the same familial line. By the 1800s, the term evolved to a chip off the old block and came to mean someone who closely resembles his parent.

Some would argue that she is a chip off the old block – I would never profess to be any authority on pacing! ( The Eastern Daily Press )

Four more exercises for this skill exist in the Grammar Bytes! MOOC [Massive Open Online Course]. Follow these directions to register.

Four more exercises for this skill exist in the Grammar Bytes! MOOC [Massive Open Online Course]. Follow these directions to register.

Four more exercises for this skill exist in the Grammar Bytes! MOOC [Massive Open Online Course]. Follow these directions to register.

Subscribe to my podcast on Apple Podcasts ,  Stitcher , SoundCloud ,  Android , Spotify , Google Play , RadioPublic , Overcast , or via  RSS . 

Connect with me on Facebook ,  Twitter , Instagram , LinkedIn , Google +, Pinterest , and  YouTube .
Subscribe to my article RSS feed .

Mignon Fogarty is the creator of Grammar Girl and the founder and managing director of Quick and Dirty Tips. A magazine writer, technical writer, and entrepreneur, she has served as a senior editor and producer at a number of health and science web sites. She has a B.A. in English from the University of Washington in Seattle and an M.S. in biology from Stanford University.

A phrase is a group of related words that does not include a subject and verb. (If the group of related words does contain a subject and verb, it is considered a clause .) There are several different kinds of phrases. Understanding how they are constructed and how they function within a sentence can bolster a writer's confidence in writing sentences that are sound in structure and various in form.

Clearly, there is nothing inherently wrong with a discontinuous noun phrase. One very good reason for a discontinuous noun phrase is to achieve a balance between a subject and its predicate:

One thing you want to watch out for with noun phrases is the long compound noun phrase.* This is sometimes called the "stacked noun phrase" or "packed noun phrase." It is common to find one noun modifying another: student body, book cover, water commission. But when we create a long string of such attributive nouns or modifiers, we create difficulties:

In linguistics , grammar (from Greek : γραμματική ) is the set of structural rules governing the composition of clauses , phrases , and words in any given natural language . The term refers also to the study of such rules, and this field includes phonology , morphology , and syntax , often complemented by phonetics , semantics , and pragmatics .

For linguists, grammar refers to cognitive information underlying language use. Speakers of a language have a set of internalized rules [1] for using that language. These rules constitute grammar, and the vast majority of the information in the grammar is—at least in the case of one's native language — acquired not by conscious study or instruction, but by observing other speakers. Much of this work is done during early childhood; learning a language later in life usually involves a greater degree of explicit instruction. [2]

Outside linguistics the term grammar is often used in a rather different sense. In some respects, it may be used more broadly, including rules of spelling and punctuation , which linguists would not typically consider to form part of grammar, but rather as a part of orthography , the set of conventions used for writing a language. In other respects, it may be used more narrowly, to refer to prescriptive grammar only and excluding those aspects of a language's grammar that are not subject to variation or debate. Jeremy Butterfield claimed that, for non-linguists, "Grammar is often a generic way of referring to any aspect of English that people object to." [6]

Uploaded by judyjordan on October 22, 2007

The idiom a chip off the old block dates back to the 1600s, though the exact rendering and meaning of the phrase has evolved over time. An idiom is a figure of speech that is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. We will examine the definition of the phrase a chip off the old block , where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences.

A chip off the old block refers to someone who closely resembles his parent either in behavior, looks, interests or character. Most often, the idiom a chip off the old block refers to a son and his father, but not always. The term was originally rendered as a chip of the same block , and was first used in Dr. Sanderson’s Sermon in 1637: “Am not I a child of the same Adam … a chip of the same block, with him?” At this time the phrase referred to any two people who came from the same familial line. By the 1800s, the term evolved to a chip off the old block and came to mean someone who closely resembles his parent.

Some would argue that she is a chip off the old block – I would never profess to be any authority on pacing! ( The Eastern Daily Press )

The idiom a chip off the old block dates back to the 1600s, though the exact rendering and meaning of the phrase has evolved over time. An idiom is a figure of speech that is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. We will examine the definition of the phrase a chip off the old block , where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences.

A chip off the old block refers to someone who closely resembles his parent either in behavior, looks, interests or character. Most often, the idiom a chip off the old block refers to a son and his father, but not always. The term was originally rendered as a chip of the same block , and was first used in Dr. Sanderson’s Sermon in 1637: “Am not I a child of the same Adam … a chip of the same block, with him?” At this time the phrase referred to any two people who came from the same familial line. By the 1800s, the term evolved to a chip off the old block and came to mean someone who closely resembles his parent.

Some would argue that she is a chip off the old block – I would never profess to be any authority on pacing! ( The Eastern Daily Press )

Four more exercises for this skill exist in the Grammar Bytes! MOOC [Massive Open Online Course]. Follow these directions to register.

Four more exercises for this skill exist in the Grammar Bytes! MOOC [Massive Open Online Course]. Follow these directions to register.

Four more exercises for this skill exist in the Grammar Bytes! MOOC [Massive Open Online Course]. Follow these directions to register.

Subscribe to my podcast on Apple Podcasts ,  Stitcher , SoundCloud ,  Android , Spotify , Google Play , RadioPublic , Overcast , or via  RSS . 

Connect with me on Facebook ,  Twitter , Instagram , LinkedIn , Google +, Pinterest , and  YouTube .
Subscribe to my article RSS feed .

Mignon Fogarty is the creator of Grammar Girl and the founder and managing director of Quick and Dirty Tips. A magazine writer, technical writer, and entrepreneur, she has served as a senior editor and producer at a number of health and science web sites. She has a B.A. in English from the University of Washington in Seattle and an M.S. in biology from Stanford University.

A phrase is a group of related words that does not include a subject and verb. (If the group of related words does contain a subject and verb, it is considered a clause .) There are several different kinds of phrases. Understanding how they are constructed and how they function within a sentence can bolster a writer's confidence in writing sentences that are sound in structure and various in form.

Clearly, there is nothing inherently wrong with a discontinuous noun phrase. One very good reason for a discontinuous noun phrase is to achieve a balance between a subject and its predicate:

One thing you want to watch out for with noun phrases is the long compound noun phrase.* This is sometimes called the "stacked noun phrase" or "packed noun phrase." It is common to find one noun modifying another: student body, book cover, water commission. But when we create a long string of such attributive nouns or modifiers, we create difficulties:

The idiom a chip off the old block dates back to the 1600s, though the exact rendering and meaning of the phrase has evolved over time. An idiom is a figure of speech that is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. We will examine the definition of the phrase a chip off the old block , where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences.

A chip off the old block refers to someone who closely resembles his parent either in behavior, looks, interests or character. Most often, the idiom a chip off the old block refers to a son and his father, but not always. The term was originally rendered as a chip of the same block , and was first used in Dr. Sanderson’s Sermon in 1637: “Am not I a child of the same Adam … a chip of the same block, with him?” At this time the phrase referred to any two people who came from the same familial line. By the 1800s, the term evolved to a chip off the old block and came to mean someone who closely resembles his parent.

Some would argue that she is a chip off the old block – I would never profess to be any authority on pacing! ( The Eastern Daily Press )

Four more exercises for this skill exist in the Grammar Bytes! MOOC [Massive Open Online Course]. Follow these directions to register.

Four more exercises for this skill exist in the Grammar Bytes! MOOC [Massive Open Online Course]. Follow these directions to register.

Four more exercises for this skill exist in the Grammar Bytes! MOOC [Massive Open Online Course]. Follow these directions to register.

Subscribe to my podcast on Apple Podcasts ,  Stitcher , SoundCloud ,  Android , Spotify , Google Play , RadioPublic , Overcast , or via  RSS . 

Connect with me on Facebook ,  Twitter , Instagram , LinkedIn , Google +, Pinterest , and  YouTube .
Subscribe to my article RSS feed .

Mignon Fogarty is the creator of Grammar Girl and the founder and managing director of Quick and Dirty Tips. A magazine writer, technical writer, and entrepreneur, she has served as a senior editor and producer at a number of health and science web sites. She has a B.A. in English from the University of Washington in Seattle and an M.S. in biology from Stanford University.

A phrase is a group of related words that does not include a subject and verb. (If the group of related words does contain a subject and verb, it is considered a clause .) There are several different kinds of phrases. Understanding how they are constructed and how they function within a sentence can bolster a writer's confidence in writing sentences that are sound in structure and various in form.

Clearly, there is nothing inherently wrong with a discontinuous noun phrase. One very good reason for a discontinuous noun phrase is to achieve a balance between a subject and its predicate:

One thing you want to watch out for with noun phrases is the long compound noun phrase.* This is sometimes called the "stacked noun phrase" or "packed noun phrase." It is common to find one noun modifying another: student body, book cover, water commission. But when we create a long string of such attributive nouns or modifiers, we create difficulties:

In linguistics , grammar (from Greek : γραμματική ) is the set of structural rules governing the composition of clauses , phrases , and words in any given natural language . The term refers also to the study of such rules, and this field includes phonology , morphology , and syntax , often complemented by phonetics , semantics , and pragmatics .

For linguists, grammar refers to cognitive information underlying language use. Speakers of a language have a set of internalized rules [1] for using that language. These rules constitute grammar, and the vast majority of the information in the grammar is—at least in the case of one's native language — acquired not by conscious study or instruction, but by observing other speakers. Much of this work is done during early childhood; learning a language later in life usually involves a greater degree of explicit instruction. [2]

Outside linguistics the term grammar is often used in a rather different sense. In some respects, it may be used more broadly, including rules of spelling and punctuation , which linguists would not typically consider to form part of grammar, but rather as a part of orthography , the set of conventions used for writing a language. In other respects, it may be used more narrowly, to refer to prescriptive grammar only and excluding those aspects of a language's grammar that are not subject to variation or debate. Jeremy Butterfield claimed that, for non-linguists, "Grammar is often a generic way of referring to any aspect of English that people object to." [6]

The idiom a chip off the old block dates back to the 1600s, though the exact rendering and meaning of the phrase has evolved over time. An idiom is a figure of speech that is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. We will examine the definition of the phrase a chip off the old block , where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences.

A chip off the old block refers to someone who closely resembles his parent either in behavior, looks, interests or character. Most often, the idiom a chip off the old block refers to a son and his father, but not always. The term was originally rendered as a chip of the same block , and was first used in Dr. Sanderson’s Sermon in 1637: “Am not I a child of the same Adam … a chip of the same block, with him?” At this time the phrase referred to any two people who came from the same familial line. By the 1800s, the term evolved to a chip off the old block and came to mean someone who closely resembles his parent.

Some would argue that she is a chip off the old block – I would never profess to be any authority on pacing! ( The Eastern Daily Press )

Four more exercises for this skill exist in the Grammar Bytes! MOOC [Massive Open Online Course]. Follow these directions to register.

Four more exercises for this skill exist in the Grammar Bytes! MOOC [Massive Open Online Course]. Follow these directions to register.

Four more exercises for this skill exist in the Grammar Bytes! MOOC [Massive Open Online Course]. Follow these directions to register.

The idiom a chip off the old block dates back to the 1600s, though the exact rendering and meaning of the phrase has evolved over time. An idiom is a figure of speech that is a word, group of words or phrase that has a figurative meaning that is not easily deduced from its literal definition. We will examine the definition of the phrase a chip off the old block , where it came from and some examples of its use in sentences.

A chip off the old block refers to someone who closely resembles his parent either in behavior, looks, interests or character. Most often, the idiom a chip off the old block refers to a son and his father, but not always. The term was originally rendered as a chip of the same block , and was first used in Dr. Sanderson’s Sermon in 1637: “Am not I a child of the same Adam … a chip of the same block, with him?” At this time the phrase referred to any two people who came from the same familial line. By the 1800s, the term evolved to a chip off the old block and came to mean someone who closely resembles his parent.

Some would argue that she is a chip off the old block – I would never profess to be any authority on pacing! ( The Eastern Daily Press )

Four more exercises for this skill exist in the Grammar Bytes! MOOC [Massive Open Online Course]. Follow these directions to register.

Four more exercises for this skill exist in the Grammar Bytes! MOOC [Massive Open Online Course]. Follow these directions to register.

Four more exercises for this skill exist in the Grammar Bytes! MOOC [Massive Open Online Course]. Follow these directions to register.

Subscribe to my podcast on Apple Podcasts ,  Stitcher , SoundCloud ,  Android , Spotify , Google Play , RadioPublic , Overcast , or via  RSS . 

Connect with me on Facebook ,  Twitter , Instagram , LinkedIn , Google +, Pinterest , and  YouTube .
Subscribe to my article RSS feed .

Mignon Fogarty is the creator of Grammar Girl and the founder and managing director of Quick and Dirty Tips. A magazine writer, technical writer, and entrepreneur, she has served as a senior editor and producer at a number of health and science web sites. She has a B.A. in English from the University of Washington in Seattle and an M.S. in biology from Stanford University.

A Grammar of the Old Friesic Language - Forgotten Books


Old English grammar - Wikipedia

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