It can be debated which was the first true horror comic as we know them today. But, there are a few issues and titles that are milestones.

Issue #7 of Prize Comics, published in December 1940, featured Dick Briefer's 'New Adventures of Frankenstein' This is considered by many historians as 'the first real horror series'. Frankenstein continued its run until Prize Comics #52 in April 1945. Briefer eventually morphed him into a humorous character.

Avon Publications' one shot Eerie Comics #1 (Jan. 1947) has been classed as 'the first out-and-out horror comic book'. This title then reappeared in 1951 and ran for 17 issues.

The Vault of Horror was a bi-monthly horror comic anthology series published by EC Comics in the early 1950s. Along with Tales from the Crypt and The Haunt of Fear , it formed a trifecta of popular EC horror anthologies. The Vault of Horror hit newsstands with its April/May 1950 issue and ceased publication with its December/January 1955 issue, producing a total of 29 issues.

Horror comics emerged as a distinct comic book genre after World War II when young adult males lost interest in caped crimebusters and returning GIs wanted more potent themes in their reading. One-shot Eerie (1947) is generally considered the first true horror comic with its cover depicting a dagger-wielding, red-eyed ghoul threatening a rope-bound , scantily clad, voluptuous young woman beneath a full moon. In 1948, Adventures Into the Unknown became the first regularly published horror title, enjoying a nearly two decade lifespan.

As with the other EC comics edited by Feldstein, the stories in this comic were primarily based on Gaines reading a large number of horror stories and using them to develop "springboards" from which he and Feldstein could launch new stories. Specific story influences that have been identified include the following:

A book’s total score is based on multiple factors, including the number of people who have voted for it and how highly those voters ranked the book.

To vote on existing books from the list, beside each book there is a link vote for this book clicking it will add that book to your votes.

To vote on books not in the list or books you couldn't find in the list, you can click on the tab add books to this list and then choose from your books, or simply search.

It can be debated which was the first true horror comic as we know them today. But, there are a few issues and titles that are milestones.

Issue #7 of Prize Comics, published in December 1940, featured Dick Briefer's 'New Adventures of Frankenstein' This is considered by many historians as 'the first real horror series'. Frankenstein continued its run until Prize Comics #52 in April 1945. Briefer eventually morphed him into a humorous character.

Avon Publications' one shot Eerie Comics #1 (Jan. 1947) has been classed as 'the first out-and-out horror comic book'. This title then reappeared in 1951 and ran for 17 issues.

The Vault of Horror was a bi-monthly horror comic anthology series published by EC Comics in the early 1950s. Along with Tales from the Crypt and The Haunt of Fear , it formed a trifecta of popular EC horror anthologies. The Vault of Horror hit newsstands with its April/May 1950 issue and ceased publication with its December/January 1955 issue, producing a total of 29 issues.

Horror comics emerged as a distinct comic book genre after World War II when young adult males lost interest in caped crimebusters and returning GIs wanted more potent themes in their reading. One-shot Eerie (1947) is generally considered the first true horror comic with its cover depicting a dagger-wielding, red-eyed ghoul threatening a rope-bound , scantily clad, voluptuous young woman beneath a full moon. In 1948, Adventures Into the Unknown became the first regularly published horror title, enjoying a nearly two decade lifespan.

As with the other EC comics edited by Feldstein, the stories in this comic were primarily based on Gaines reading a large number of horror stories and using them to develop "springboards" from which he and Feldstein could launch new stories. Specific story influences that have been identified include the following:

A book’s total score is based on multiple factors, including the number of people who have voted for it and how highly those voters ranked the book.

To vote on existing books from the list, beside each book there is a link vote for this book clicking it will add that book to your votes.

To vote on books not in the list or books you couldn't find in the list, you can click on the tab add books to this list and then choose from your books, or simply search.

The horror tradition in sequential-art narrative traces back to at least the 12th-century Heian period Japanese scroll "Gaki Zoshi", or the scroll of hungry ghosts (紙本著色餓鬼草紙) [1] [2] [3] and the 16th-century Mixtec codices . [3]

In the early 20th century, pulp magazines developed the horror subgenre " weird menace ", which featured sadistic villains and graphic scenes of torture and brutality. The first such title, Popular Publications' Dime Mystery , began as a straight crime fiction magazine but evolved by 1933 under the influence of Grand Guignol theater. [4] Other publishers eventually joined in, though Popular dominated the field with Dime Mystery , Horror Stories , and Terror Tales . While most weird-menace stories were resolved with rational explanations, some involved the supernatural.

After the fledgling medium of comic books became established by the late 1930s, horror-fiction elements began appearing in superhero stories, with vampires, misshapen creatures, mad scientists and other tropes that bore the influence of the Universal horror films of the 1930s and other sources. [5]

It can be debated which was the first true horror comic as we know them today. But, there are a few issues and titles that are milestones.

Issue #7 of Prize Comics, published in December 1940, featured Dick Briefer's 'New Adventures of Frankenstein' This is considered by many historians as 'the first real horror series'. Frankenstein continued its run until Prize Comics #52 in April 1945. Briefer eventually morphed him into a humorous character.

Avon Publications' one shot Eerie Comics #1 (Jan. 1947) has been classed as 'the first out-and-out horror comic book'. This title then reappeared in 1951 and ran for 17 issues.

It can be debated which was the first true horror comic as we know them today. But, there are a few issues and titles that are milestones.

Issue #7 of Prize Comics, published in December 1940, featured Dick Briefer's 'New Adventures of Frankenstein' This is considered by many historians as 'the first real horror series'. Frankenstein continued its run until Prize Comics #52 in April 1945. Briefer eventually morphed him into a humorous character.

Avon Publications' one shot Eerie Comics #1 (Jan. 1947) has been classed as 'the first out-and-out horror comic book'. This title then reappeared in 1951 and ran for 17 issues.

The Vault of Horror was a bi-monthly horror comic anthology series published by EC Comics in the early 1950s. Along with Tales from the Crypt and The Haunt of Fear , it formed a trifecta of popular EC horror anthologies. The Vault of Horror hit newsstands with its April/May 1950 issue and ceased publication with its December/January 1955 issue, producing a total of 29 issues.

Horror comics emerged as a distinct comic book genre after World War II when young adult males lost interest in caped crimebusters and returning GIs wanted more potent themes in their reading. One-shot Eerie (1947) is generally considered the first true horror comic with its cover depicting a dagger-wielding, red-eyed ghoul threatening a rope-bound , scantily clad, voluptuous young woman beneath a full moon. In 1948, Adventures Into the Unknown became the first regularly published horror title, enjoying a nearly two decade lifespan.

As with the other EC comics edited by Feldstein, the stories in this comic were primarily based on Gaines reading a large number of horror stories and using them to develop "springboards" from which he and Feldstein could launch new stories. Specific story influences that have been identified include the following:

85 of the Best Horror Comics (Updated) :: Comics.


Horror Comics

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