Water is essential for life, but increasingly, it is viewed as a source of windfall profits. This is unacceptable; access to clean water should not be based on who can pay the most.

Food & Water Watch opposes the commodification and privatization of water in all forms. We support managing water supplies as a public trust, improving our public water systems and making water service safe and affordable for all.

Bottled water means massive corporate profits—and less support for our public water. Multinational corporations like Nestlé Waters, PepsiCo and Coca-Cola sell single-use plastic bottles – waste that ends up in landfills and ultimately, litters our oceans – for thousands of times what it costs to get that water from the tap. While they market bottled water as a beverage of convenience, it’s coming at the expense of our public water infrastructure — which has provided affordable and convenient access to water for over a hundred years.

“Direct experience with common problems of private water management – from lack of infrastructure investments, to tariff hikes to environmental hazards – has persuaded communities and policymakers that the public sector is better placed to provide quality services to citizens and promote the human right to water,” said the report’s author, Satoko Kishimoto , water coordinator with the Transnational Institute in Brussels.

“A growing number of water utilities that have gone through a re-municipalisation process are increasingly ready, along with other institutions, to share experiences and provide practical support. Cooperation between public services is the most efficient way to improve water services and promote the human right to water,” she said.

This week, the IFC said it had no ongoing water concession projects in Africa, and was working on very few in developing countries generally. From a high of 85 major projects in 2007, only 22 were recorded as starting in 2013. Moreover, 63 projects, representing 28% of the IFC’s total water investments over the past 20 years, have failed or are in difficulty, according to the bank.

Most of the time, water resources are owned and maintained by public organizations such as local governments. When these public resources are transferred to private companies, this is known as privatization. Loosely defined, water privatization usually refers to the control or maintenance of water systems and water resources by private entities. For instance, a company might work with a local municipality to build and maintain a water treatment plant or wastewater facility. In a more controversial example, a private company might draw and bottle water from a public source with the intent of making a profit.

Water is such an important public resource and has been maintained by the public sector for so long that concept of water privatization can be controversial. In some countries, laws might be put in place to assure that citizens have water rights while restricting the water rights of corporations. On the other hand, private companies might lobby for expanded water rights to include private companies regardless of scale.

Opponents to water privatization might argue that private companies will be concerned only with making profit and will ignore the environmental and long-term costs of private water practices. Private companies usually are concerned with the bottom line, so they might focus on short-term benefits. As with the privatization of electricity, opponents to water privatization might argue that allowing private entities to control essential ingredients of life would be disastrous.

In England and Wales, the emergence of the first private water companies dates back to the 17th century. In 1820, six private water companies operated in London. However, the market share of private water companies in London declined from 40% in 1860 to 10% in 1900. In the 1980s, their share all over England and Wales was about 25%. [14] The tide turned completely in 1989 when the conservative government of Margaret Thatcher privatized all public water and sewer companies in England and Wales. In Scotland local governments dominated by the Labour party kept water systems in public hands.

In Spain, private water companies maintained their position, budging the global trend during the late 19th and early 20th century. [17] The largest private water company in Spain is Aguas de Barcelona . Initially created by French and Belgian investors, it was sold to Spanish investors in 1920, only to gradually come back under French control in the early 21st century. [18]

In Germany, a British private water company had set up the first piped water system and treatment plant in Berlin in 1852, but the city, dissatisfied with the lack of investment in particular in sewerage, cancelled the contract in 1873. [19] In 1887 Gelsenwasser was created, which remains an important regional water supplier in the Ruhr district. The German water sector has always been dominated by municipally owned utilities. Despite this, the water system of Berlin was partially privatized in 1999 for fiscal reasons.

Water is essential for life, but increasingly, it is viewed as a source of windfall profits. This is unacceptable; access to clean water should not be based on who can pay the most.

Food & Water Watch opposes the commodification and privatization of water in all forms. We support managing water supplies as a public trust, improving our public water systems and making water service safe and affordable for all.

Bottled water means massive corporate profits—and less support for our public water. Multinational corporations like Nestlé Waters, PepsiCo and Coca-Cola sell single-use plastic bottles – waste that ends up in landfills and ultimately, litters our oceans – for thousands of times what it costs to get that water from the tap. While they market bottled water as a beverage of convenience, it’s coming at the expense of our public water infrastructure — which has provided affordable and convenient access to water for over a hundred years.

Water is essential for life, but increasingly, it is viewed as a source of windfall profits. This is unacceptable; access to clean water should not be based on who can pay the most.

Food & Water Watch opposes the commodification and privatization of water in all forms. We support managing water supplies as a public trust, improving our public water systems and making water service safe and affordable for all.

Bottled water means massive corporate profits—and less support for our public water. Multinational corporations like Nestlé Waters, PepsiCo and Coca-Cola sell single-use plastic bottles – waste that ends up in landfills and ultimately, litters our oceans – for thousands of times what it costs to get that water from the tap. While they market bottled water as a beverage of convenience, it’s coming at the expense of our public water infrastructure — which has provided affordable and convenient access to water for over a hundred years.

“Direct experience with common problems of private water management – from lack of infrastructure investments, to tariff hikes to environmental hazards – has persuaded communities and policymakers that the public sector is better placed to provide quality services to citizens and promote the human right to water,” said the report’s author, Satoko Kishimoto , water coordinator with the Transnational Institute in Brussels.

“A growing number of water utilities that have gone through a re-municipalisation process are increasingly ready, along with other institutions, to share experiences and provide practical support. Cooperation between public services is the most efficient way to improve water services and promote the human right to water,” she said.

This week, the IFC said it had no ongoing water concession projects in Africa, and was working on very few in developing countries generally. From a high of 85 major projects in 2007, only 22 were recorded as starting in 2013. Moreover, 63 projects, representing 28% of the IFC’s total water investments over the past 20 years, have failed or are in difficulty, according to the bank.

Water is essential for life, but increasingly, it is viewed as a source of windfall profits. This is unacceptable; access to clean water should not be based on who can pay the most.

Food & Water Watch opposes the commodification and privatization of water in all forms. We support managing water supplies as a public trust, improving our public water systems and making water service safe and affordable for all.

Bottled water means massive corporate profits—and less support for our public water. Multinational corporations like Nestlé Waters, PepsiCo and Coca-Cola sell single-use plastic bottles – waste that ends up in landfills and ultimately, litters our oceans – for thousands of times what it costs to get that water from the tap. While they market bottled water as a beverage of convenience, it’s coming at the expense of our public water infrastructure — which has provided affordable and convenient access to water for over a hundred years.

“Direct experience with common problems of private water management – from lack of infrastructure investments, to tariff hikes to environmental hazards – has persuaded communities and policymakers that the public sector is better placed to provide quality services to citizens and promote the human right to water,” said the report’s author, Satoko Kishimoto , water coordinator with the Transnational Institute in Brussels.

“A growing number of water utilities that have gone through a re-municipalisation process are increasingly ready, along with other institutions, to share experiences and provide practical support. Cooperation between public services is the most efficient way to improve water services and promote the human right to water,” she said.

This week, the IFC said it had no ongoing water concession projects in Africa, and was working on very few in developing countries generally. From a high of 85 major projects in 2007, only 22 were recorded as starting in 2013. Moreover, 63 projects, representing 28% of the IFC’s total water investments over the past 20 years, have failed or are in difficulty, according to the bank.

Most of the time, water resources are owned and maintained by public organizations such as local governments. When these public resources are transferred to private companies, this is known as privatization. Loosely defined, water privatization usually refers to the control or maintenance of water systems and water resources by private entities. For instance, a company might work with a local municipality to build and maintain a water treatment plant or wastewater facility. In a more controversial example, a private company might draw and bottle water from a public source with the intent of making a profit.

Water is such an important public resource and has been maintained by the public sector for so long that concept of water privatization can be controversial. In some countries, laws might be put in place to assure that citizens have water rights while restricting the water rights of corporations. On the other hand, private companies might lobby for expanded water rights to include private companies regardless of scale.

Opponents to water privatization might argue that private companies will be concerned only with making profit and will ignore the environmental and long-term costs of private water practices. Private companies usually are concerned with the bottom line, so they might focus on short-term benefits. As with the privatization of electricity, opponents to water privatization might argue that allowing private entities to control essential ingredients of life would be disastrous.

What is the Benefit of Privatizing Water? - State of the.


Water Privatization: Facts and Figures | Food & Water Watch

Posted by 2018 article

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